CDMo reader Seej has been getting rather DIY projection, with instructions on how to build a portable projector screen, and a DIY projector mount.

Seej projects » Blog Archive » Build a Portable Screen.jpg

I do a lot of projection installations, in unique locations, usually with about zero setup time. When I looked into buying a professional 10’x7’ “fast-fold” screen, I was blown away by how much they cost. Instead, I decided to design my own, using easy to find materials.

The Challenge:
1. Fast to set-up
2. Fits in a cab
3. Front or rear projection
4. Affordable

We’ve seen a similar projector mount before at VJKungFu, but Seej’s version seems to be even easier. A couple of these would have saved countless setup hours for me over the last year.

So, the next step is to make this even cheaper: Does anyone have a source for cheap ball joint heads and clamps?

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  • …how about fire safety? A lot of places I gig won´t let me through the door with anything that´s not certified to withstand an F-15 afterburner.

    I could use a stage curtin that´s safe as milk, and easy to hang and fold, and that cleans itself and brings me beer.

    🙂

  • Good point pekka. I guess you need to choose your venues wisely. In Australia for many venues it's technically a requirement that all power cables be tagged with official labels saying that they're "safe". Of course, most of our cables are IEC leads, which can be plugged into just about anything. So this doesn't certify that the device is ok, just that the cable itself has been "tested". We have similar rules for fire safety as well. They're there for a reason, but if you take reasonable precautions you shouldn't have any trouble.

    That said, the recommended material for that screen is designed for projection, and flame-retardant. Yay, safety!

  • visceralX

    cool. also, if you happen to use some non-fire-safe fabric, perhaps you could treat it with a fire retarding chemical – the kind used for fireproofing theater sets and scenery? i've seen it available through theater supply companies like Roscoe. dunno if that would have any effect on the optical properties of the material, but it is sposed to dry 'invisible'…like magic!= )