facesofn

Sounds and images need not be synthesized from fancy gear. The snap of a bra strap or the rustling sound of silk can become musical materials.

That’s exactly what happens in Faces of N., an EP and series of music videos made from the sounds of clothing, micro-edited into visual/sonic sequences. The project is the work of Gabriel Shalom, an interdisciplinary artist whose work often treads across media, and who has fused visual and sonic content before, treating each as a single material to be manipulated.

The first video is out this week, with five more to follow – one for each separate outfit, accompanied by separate tracks. And somehow, all of this fits into his theory of hypercubism, melding perspectives in cinema – see our previous write-up on his aesthetic theories there. But for now, it’s fun just to watch and take it in. We’ll have to see how this is spun into a complete album over the coming weeks.

Let’s look:

Prelude to Faces of N. from Gabriel Shalom on Vimeo.

In a nice twist on the credits, the artist explains how he has conceived the ensemble in textile form:

Ornamental Silk Scarf: Castanets, Surdo, Maracas
Beige Pleated Chiffon Dress: Snare, Brushes
Black Felt Fedora: Cymbal
Foxtail: Percussion
Oversize Sequined Skull Sweatshirt: Clap, Kick Drum, Granular Bass Synthesizer
White Ruffled Victorian Blouse: Snare
Black Acrylic Skull and Crystal Chain Necklace: Granular Lead Synthesizer
Red Jersey Triangle Bra: Snaps
Hoop Charm Earring: Granular Lead Synthesizer Arpeggios

Directed, composed and choreographed by Gabriel Shalom
Featuring the performance and wardrobe of Nicole Roscher
Colors corrected by Carlos Vasquez
Titles by Patrizia Kommerell
Hypertext designed and built by Cameron Askin

http://www.gabrielshalom.com/

  • Cut&PasteExpert

    Hey look, it’s 1998 all over again! Except this time the software does it for you..

  • Dom Harwood

    I made a bunch of tracks out of only the sound of clothes (and the machines used to make them) a few years ago: http://tootdotcom.com/remade%20in%20switzerland.html

  • James Husted

    just goes to show that any sound can be turned into a tone to use as music when you add a granulator and some time – lots of time to make a “song” out of it.