Let’s admit it: what we all want out of sync is some magic box that just makes everything work. We just want to plug things in, turn a knob, and have everything sync up.

Caveats: we want everything. (USB? DIN? MIDI? Modulars?) And, come to think of it, we probably then start to want to do other fun stuff like shift things around.

That is, not all of us want to write technical papers on the topic. But fortunately, Maximilian Rest did write a paper on it. He then built a jitter-free MIDI clock.

Well, it gets better. First, the midiclock – CDM review coming very soon – added DIN and modular for those of you with extra gear. Second, the MULTI-FORMAT-MASTER-CLOCK is a high-end box, revealed just a few hours ago, that will do even more, for those of you who want sync with all the fixins’.

Details:

Current state of development of the new E-RM Erfindungsbüro MULTI-FORMAT-MASTER-CLOCK solution.

• 4 ultra precise channels, derived from DAW audio clock, MIDI or DIN Sync, all separately shiftable and swingable in real time

• Hot-Plug support for MIDI, DIN, Modular Clock & Analog LFO

• Built in MIDI Matrix to dynamically map & merge MIDI channels and events

• unused channels can be used as a MIDI controller

• 5 channel MIDI USB support optionally available

Available soon.

www.e-rm.de

This will I believe put the new product in direct rivalry with Koma Elektronik’s RH301. Sorry, Roland – I have to recommend the RH301 over the AIRA SBX-1. Koma’s 14-point patch bay and rhythmic options are more creative than the AIRA, yet the lovely boutique construction and solid sync performance are available at roughly the same price. (See also the ACME4, though I’m guessing E-RM won’t have that sort of luxury price tag.)

The Koma remains more of a creative tool than the ERM, but the ERM has some rhythmic tricks of its own – for many users, it may be down to performance and utility of design. Will be fun to compare these two Berlin-made boutique boxes when the ERM becomes available.

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  • Mike Kiraly

    It seems that Innerclock Systems always gets looked over in these conversations. I’ve got a SyncGen (both stand alone and Eurorack module) and they are rock solid. My modular syncs to my DAW with 100% accuracy, down to the sample. Everything else in my room syncs amazingly, and any inaccuracies are due to the gear being controlled. Oddly enough, the man who pioneered midi is responsible for the worst sync in my setup – Tempest, I’m looking at you.

    • sbrat

      The SyncGen eurorack was a godsend for my setup, I recommend it to anyone looking for a sync solution like this. It does seem to get overlooked by a lot people who could benefit from it (or something like it.) A lot of people just aren’t aware of its existence, or have trouble understanding it when they see it.

      This device seems to share the same basic principles as the SyncGen: derive the MIDI clock from the DAW audio clock through a VST plug-in, generate clock pulses over the audio output, and send them to the device which converts them to the necessary MIDI clock/transport messages it generates from the DIN ports.

  • Mike Kiraly

    It seems that Innerclock Systems always gets looked over in these conversations. I’ve got a SyncGen (both stand alone and Eurorack module) and they are rock solid. My modular syncs to my DAW with 100% accuracy, down to the sample. Everything else in my room syncs amazingly, and any inaccuracies are due to the gear being controlled. Oddly enough, the man who pioneered midi is responsible for the worst sync in my setup – Tempest, I’m looking at you.

    • sbrat

      The SyncGen eurorack was a godsend for my setup, I recommend it to anyone looking for a sync solution like this. It does seem to get overlooked by a lot people who could benefit from it (or something like it.) A lot of people just aren’t aware of its existence, or have trouble understanding it when they see it.

      This device seems to share the same basic principles as the SyncGen: derive the MIDI clock from the DAW audio clock through a VST plug-in, generate clock pulses over the audio output, and send them to the device which converts them to the necessary MIDI clock/transport messages it generates from the DIN ports.

  • Andrew Ostler

    Reading this, you’d think this had never been done before. As noted below the Innerclock SyncGen also generates a jitter free clock, as does the Expert Sleepers system (Silent Way, ESX-8MD etc.).

    • Ezmyrelda

      From what it sounds like to me, this hasn’t been done in this particular way with this particular feature set.. So far this is the only product of it’s type that has peaked my interest.

  • Andrew Ostler

    Reading this, you’d think this had never been done before. As noted below the Innerclock SyncGen also generates a jitter free clock, as does the Expert Sleepers system (Silent Way, ESX-8MD etc.).

    • Ezmyrelda

      From what it sounds like to me, this hasn’t been done in this particular way with this particular feature set.. So far this is the only product of it’s type that has peaked my interest.

  • Justin Reed

    I agree with the other posters that innerclock and expert sleepers should be mentioned in this context more than the roland SBX (which uses jitter prone midi over USB as a DAW clock source). That said – this product looks like a more comprehensive and (hopefully) less expensive alternative to the innerclock offering as well as offering discreet shift and swing outputs to each channel. In short – looks incredible but i am waiting for a sticker shock…

  • Justin Reed

    I agree with the other posters that innerclock and expert sleepers should be mentioned in this context more than the roland SBX (which uses jitter prone midi over USB as a DAW clock source). That said – this product looks like a more comprehensive and (hopefully) less expensive alternative to the innerclock offering as well as offering discreet shift and swing outputs to each channel. In short – looks incredible but i am waiting for a sticker shock…

  • D

    Innerclock wins in this category, and this device is unnecessary now that Roland has the SBX-1 out.

    I have been using my new SBX to control my 101 (through the CV and Gate), TB-303, TR-606, TR-707, TR-727, TR-808, arpeggio on my Juno-60, midi sequencers on my iPad, and sending clock to all my FX for delay times.

    It’s rock solid, and the “shuffle” feature is absolutely dead on. The first time you hear a 303 and 808 swinging perfectly together is mind blowing.

    I’m all for new gear, and I wish them the best of luck, but this has been supersede before it’s even been released.

  • D

    Innerclock wins in this category, and this device is unnecessary now that Roland has the SBX-1 out.

    I have been using my new SBX to control my 101 (through the CV and Gate), TB-303, TR-606, TR-707, TR-727, TR-808, arpeggio on my Juno-60, midi sequencers on my iPad, and sending clock to all my FX for delay times.

    It’s rock solid, and the “shuffle” feature is absolutely dead on. The first time you hear a 303 and 808 swinging perfectly together is mind blowing.

    I’m all for new gear, and I wish them the best of luck, but this has been supersede before it’s even been released.