win93

It’s a nostalgia trip. It’s a net art piece. It’s a parallel dimension.

It’s also working music apps running (sort of) in your browser. It feels a little bit like playing with an elaborate doll house where you can open the fridge and add tiny food and the oven pretends to work. But in case you haven’t already been infected with the quantum distraction power of the Windows 93 browser yet, it might interest you to know that there are music apps inside.

There’s Pd – kinda. (Double-click the icon and it spawns a non-editable patch running in your browser.)

There’s also LSDJ, the quintessential Game Boy tracker. And there’s Nanoloop, the classic, beautifully-minimal Game Boy music maker that later migrated to iOS and Android (though that takes out the fun of buying weird hardware from Japan to hack our Nintendo handhelds). Those both appear to be running in a Nintendo emulation layer in-browser.

Play that and a glitched-out Pokemon plus get and disinfect yourself from computer viruses before you watch an ASCII Star Wars.

It says something about the evolution of net art, here as it’s steeped in layers of history and nerd-hipster irony. (Can I re-launch my campaign to make “nerdster” a thing?) It also might say something practical about how more-powerful browsers really could change the way we share music tools. Native software still seems perfectly safe from the browser; we still use native tools for desktop and mobile. But I’ve yet to see someone make good use of the Web as a teaching tool, or to share work. This is a reminder of what’s possible, hyperlinked to loads of tools and code for developers to explore themselves.

And I bet they would make something absolutely amazing, if I didn’t just destroy their productivity for the rest of the week by sharing … this. Wait, I may have just explained why we haven’t seen more Web tools. You read it here firs– hey, stop double-clicking that dolphin and read, darn it!

Details, and links to some JavaScript goodness (and another appearance of the Web Audio API):

Jankenpopp & Zombectro are running the thing,
the Mighty Doctor House is hosting the thing.

Credits

animate.css | CSS animations
GameBoy-Online | GameBoy Color emulator written in JavaScript
www.piskelapp.com | Pixel Art and Animated Sprites editor
threejs.org | JavaScript 3D library
codemirror.net | text editor implemented in JavaScript for the browser
codef.santo.fr | Canvas Oldshool Demo Effect Framework
www.asciimation.co.nz | Star Wars Asciimation
jGravity | A jQuery Gravity Plugin
howler.js | Modern Web Audio Javascript Library

Many are still missing… we’ll try to credit everyone soon 🙂
If we forgot you, we’re sorry, you can ask us a link at contact@windows93.net

http://www.windows93.net

  • t

    “you cheating skank! town bicycle!” really? c’mon

    • ilana yocheved

      ditto. c’mon Peter, I know you’re better than that sort of “joke”.

  • oliver

    “Nanoloop, … that later migrated to iOS and Android (so we didn’t get the pleasure of buying weird hardware from Japan to hack our Nintendo handhelds any more).”

    The original version for Game Boy is still available as cartridge, and not just that, it’s also still developing further. The latest major update was only weeks ago (http://www.nanoloop.com/one/index.html). You can still buy weird hardware to hack your Game Boy, it’s from Germany though.

    • Ah yes, I didn’t mean to imply you couldn’t *also* go that route. Will revise the text.

    • TCHURROS3000

      zombectro (the man behind windows93) is also an active nanoloop artist. make sure to check his stuff and of course get yourself a nanoloop 1.7 cartridge as oliver said !
      https://www.facebook.com/zombectrohttp://www.nanoloop.de/

  • oliver

    “Nanoloop, … that later migrated to iOS and Android (so we didn’t get the pleasure of buying weird hardware from Japan to hack our Nintendo handhelds any more).”

    The original version for Game Boy is still available as cartridge, and not just that, it’s also still developing further. The latest major update was only weeks ago ( http://www.nanoloop.com/one/index.html ). You can still buy weird hardware to hack your Game Boy, it’s from Germany though.

    • Ah yes, I didn’t mean to imply you couldn’t *also* go that route. Will revise the text.

    • TCHURROS3000

      zombectro (the man behind windows93) is also an active nanoloop artist. make sure to check his stuff and of course get yourself a nanoloop 1.7 cartridge as oliver said !
      https://www.facebook.com/zombectrohttp://www.nanoloop.de/

  • oliver

    “Nanoloop, … that later migrated to iOS and Android (so we didn’t get the pleasure of buying weird hardware from Japan to hack our Nintendo handhelds any more).”

    The original version for Game Boy is still available as cartridge, and not just that, it’s also still developing further. The latest major update was only weeks ago ( http://www.nanoloop.com/one/index.html ). You can still buy weird hardware to hack your Game Boy, it’s from Germany though.

    • Ah yes, I didn’t mean to imply you couldn’t *also* go that route. Will revise the text.

    • TCHURROS3000

      zombectro (the man behind windows93) is also an active nanoloop artist. make sure to check his stuff and of course get yourself a nanoloop 1.7 cartridge as oliver said !
      https://www.facebook.com/zombectrohttp://www.nanoloop.de/

  • regend

    so bugged out.

  • regend

    so bugged out.

  • regend

    so bugged out.

  • josh

    FYI, I passed this on to friends, and one of them warned me that he immediately got a warning from his firewall (at work) of a blocked Trojan that originated at the same IP as that site. Maybe don’t poke around there after all.

    (As someone else responded in convo: “This is taking historical accuracy too far.”)

    • Not sure about that… I’ve found that some experimental Web stuff can trigger false positives. Not to scare people off the adventurous Web tech; it’s more like some of this software is not engineered in the right way.

      Anyway, I’m curious if anyone else can verify what’s actually going on here.

      • Stive

        Yeah, some antivirus scan keywords, and there is a line in the windows93 source refering the author of an old virus! I don’t quote it, or createdigitalmusic will generate false positive too.

  • josh

    FYI, I passed this on to friends, and one of them warned me that he immediately got a warning from his firewall (at work) of a blocked Trojan that originated at the same IP as that site. Maybe don’t poke around there after all.

    (As someone else responded in convo: “This is taking historical accuracy too far.”)

    • Not sure about that… I’ve found that some experimental Web stuff can trigger false positives. Not to scare people off the adventurous Web tech; it’s more like some of this software is not engineered in the right way.

      Anyway, I’m curious if anyone else can verify what’s actually going on here.

      • Stive

        Yeah, some antivirus scan keywords, and there is a line in the windows93 source refering the author of an old virus! I don’t quote it, or createdigitalmusic will generate false positive too.

  • josh

    FYI, I passed this on to friends, and one of them warned me that he immediately got a warning from his firewall (at work) of a blocked Trojan that originated at the same IP as that site. Maybe don’t poke around there after all.

    (As someone else responded in convo: “This is taking historical accuracy too far.”)

    • Not sure about that… I’ve found that some experimental Web stuff can trigger false positives. Not to scare people off the adventurous Web tech; it’s more like some of this software is not engineered in the right way.

      Anyway, I’m curious if anyone else can verify what’s actually going on here.

      • Stive

        Yeah, some antivirus scan keywords, and there is a line in the windows93 source refering the author of an old virus! I don’t quote it, or createdigitalmusic will generate false positive too.

  • Jim Aikin

    “I’ve yet to see someone make good use of the Web as a teaching tool.” FYI, I’ve tried a working version of Csound that runs in your browser. I don’t have the link handy, but I can track it down if anyone is interested. I can’t recall which browser(s) it works in — not all of them. But it does work. You can type code, hit the compile button, and hear the audio being generated in real time.

    • There are a couple of good examples of this — Pd, too. I was thinking pairing this with examples. More funding needed. 😉

      • if could PD work in the browser then could something like live 9 also work?

        • PaulDavisTheFirst

          pd has pretty simplistic GUI requirements; Live uses GL as the base layer for its GUI. that could be hard to reconcile with the browser environment.

          • well how about live work in 8bit? like a program that might run on 98 ..

  • Jim Aikin

    “I’ve yet to see someone make good use of the Web as a teaching tool.” FYI, I’ve tried a working version of Csound that runs in your browser. I don’t have the link handy, but I can track it down if anyone is interested. I can’t recall which browser(s) it works in — not all of them. But it does work. You can type code, hit the compile button, and hear the audio being generated in real time.

    • There are a couple of good examples of this — Pd, too. I was thinking pairing this with examples. More funding needed. 😉

      • if could PD works in the browser then could something like live 9 also work?

        • PaulDavisTheFirst

          pd has pretty simplistic GUI requirements; Live uses GL as the base layer for its GUI. that could be hard to reconcile with the browser environment.

          • well how about live work in 8bit? like a program that might run on 98 ..

  • Jim Aikin

    “I’ve yet to see someone make good use of the Web as a teaching tool.” FYI, I’ve tried a working version of Csound that runs in your browser. I don’t have the link handy, but I can track it down if anyone is interested. I can’t recall which browser(s) it works in — not all of them. But it does work. You can type code, hit the compile button, and hear the audio being generated in real time.

    • There are a couple of good examples of this — Pd, too. I was thinking pairing this with examples. More funding needed. 😉

      • if could PD works in the browser then could something like live 9 also work?

        • PaulDavisTheFirst

          pd has pretty simplistic GUI requirements; Live uses GL as the base layer for its GUI. that could be hard to reconcile with the browser environment.

          • well how about live work in 8bit? like a program that might run on 98 ..

  • Callum Davenport-Lambton

    With a playstation 1 boot sound. I had some good times on that game system

  • Callum Davenport-Lambton

    With a playstation 1 boot sound. I had some good times on that game system

  • kingof9x

    With a playstation 1 boot sound. I had some good times on that game system

  • Krzysztof Cybulski

    it’s incredible! and it reall has that vibe of win 95, my first operating system…
    Speaking of operating systems in a browser, check out Niklas Roy’s “cyberniklas OS” – lot of fun as well!

  • Krzysztof Cybulski

    it’s incredible! and it reall has that vibe of win 95, my first operating system…
    Speaking of operating systems in a browser, check out Niklas Roy’s “cyberniklas OS” – lot of fun as well!

  • Krzysztof Cybulski

    it’s incredible! and it reall has that vibe of win 95, my first operating system…
    Speaking of operating systems in a browser, check out Niklas Roy’s “cyberniklas OS” – lot of fun as well!

  • how this is done ? what code is it?

  • how this is done ? what code is it?

  • how this is done ? what code is it?

  • Gob

    I’m not able to get Nanoloop to run. It will show the version number and sit there eternally.

  • Gob

    I’m not able to get Nanoloop to run. It will show the version number and sit there eternally.

  • Gob

    I’m not able to get Nanoloop to run. It will show the version number and sit there eternally.