Introducing Keezy Drummer from Elepath, Inc. on Vimeo.

Here is a plot line we’ve heard before: Musical interfaces are complicated. That makes them unfriendly to beginners. They give you options you don’t need. (So far, no argument.) The solution, of course, is some new product.

Each time we hear this plot line, someone talks about it like they’ve discovered it for the first time. This time, it’s Keezy Drummer, a new, simple drum machine app. You can hear them talking to The Verge about why this will change music technology, and why apparently in several decades of drum machines, they’re the first to work out this solution.

Here’s my challenge to you: try to actually use Keezy Drummer, and make it something you will not only use once, but come back to again and again. Go ahead: the app is free. I’ll wait.

It’s fun for a moment, right? And then you discover you can’t change the sounds. (It plays back only samples.) So you can’t get a sound quite the way you like. And you can’t really vary the patterns, so they get boring.

But maybe you do get a pattern you like. Unfortunately, you can’t save it – there’s only a delete button. And you can’t give it to others, so you can’t share it.

keezyiphone

The creators of Keezy are right: music hardware is complicated. It’s often expensive, and heavy, and takes up a lot of space. But then, here’s a question they didn’t ask: all that being true, why are so many people spending hundreds of dollars to buy something like the AIRA TR-8 drum machine? Listen: even the name of it is sort of confusing. It sounds at best like it might be some sort of predator robot from the future that’s come back in time to kill you. Yet people love the thing.

The answer, of course, is that some of that complexity is there for a reason. It was solving some problem those users had. And if it’s sometimes too complicated, it’s probably trying to solve a lot of problems of a lot of different people. But people spend money on hardware and software like this because they want to spend a lot of time with it. Despite what you may have seen recently on South Park, and unlike a lot other iPhone apps, they aren’t just using them sitting on toilets.

Keezy’s creators hint that some sort of sharing connectivity could be the secret to making Drummer useful. But – that doesn’t matter, because they didn’t ship it. They get credit for that idea if they can make it real. Also, we’ve seen just this kind of grid before, so that isn’t yet a compelling reason to use Drummer, either. (The Verge sums it up neatly, comparing with other apps: “none are as fun to play with in the first minute of trying it out.” Right – but what about after that first minute?)

Keezy is making beautiful apps. They’re also making beautiful demo videos. And I’d like to see Drummer evolve, as well as the first Keezy app, because maybe it could grow into something I don’t want to immediately delete.

Introducing Keezy from Elepath, Inc. on Vimeo.

The original Keezy, indeed, gets more interesting as you use some simple-but-clever features, like “sticky” recording:

Sticky Record Demo with Reni Lane from Keezy on Vimeo.

Or using more sophisticated techniques to play it:

And the original Keezy fits better with the photography metaphor introduced in the interview with The Verge. Simple camera apps work because photography itself is unlimited. Keezy can afford to be simple because the mic is open-ended – hence, Reggie Watts turns out to be so interesting. That’s not necessarily so with drum machines.

I don’t want to discourage creative designers and developers from minimalism. On the contrary, it’s a challenge we should all give ourselves as creators. We should just accept that simple isn’t easy. It’s not just taking things out.

Taking stuff out is often a good step – but it may then mean putting something back in. I was at least satisfied that Auxy, the pattern sequencer app, will eventually add in export features we need, and introduced a touch interface worth watching. But even that I’ll use only once it adds export.

And I believe in putting my money where my mouth is. We are adding tilt control back into WretchUp, the app we built for Mouse on Mars, and we’re working on Audiobus support. So I know first-hand the dangers of getting stuck on simplicity. I think we’ll also have to make sure this is something people want to continue to play, as Michael Forrest did with the app over the weekend.

Einstein, of course, is attributed as saying “everything should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler.” Emphasis mine.

Or to quote Alfred North Whitehead – and this may even better apply to iOS developers – “seek simplicity, and distrust it.”

  • Jake Lodwick

    We like CDM, some of us are regular readers. But we didn’t reach out to cover the Drummer launch because it’s the wrong target audience.

    We’re not going for people who read about new music apps or have ever heard of AIRA. We’re going for a very broad audience. Children, dancers, musicians who find real drum machines too confusing.

    As we evolve the app, new features will be integrated that will make it increasingly useful to nerds like us. Creating your own kit, exporting beats, Inter-App Audio / Audiobus, etc. It’s obvious that those are crucial, but we still have to figure out how to add them in a way that doesn’t compromise the basic simplicity.

    • No, I don’t think you read my criticism. The problem isn’t that it’s a different audience, the problem is that it is failing to ask some key questions.

      There isn’t a way to adjust sounds.

      There isn’t a way to vary patterns.

      There isn’t a way to share your work.

      In fact, adding something like Audiobus before considering the fundamental question is the last thing I would advise.

      The first instrument I ever learned was a piano. Over three *decades* later, I’m still playing it. Children, dancers, and musicians are the first people who deserve those kinds of instruments.

      I don’t do what I do “for nerds” or for specialists. I do it because I’ve had a lifetime involvement in music, and I believe that design – *especially* the most simple designs – should serve that same amount of depth.

      Now, if something is intended as a toy or a diversion, that’s fine. But the interview with The Verge has you taking on the music instruments industry. And I think we should actually raise the expectations here – the music instruments industry should be subjected to the same demands of simplicity and elegance, just as a simple UX for music ought to be expected to provide rewards longer than a couple of minutes. And I felt Drummer (and Keezy) were good enough as starting points to be worth criticizing.

      • Are We Not Men?

        I think both sides have valid points, yet this one quote from The Verge article gives Peter’s criticisms some more strength:

        “The world of pro audio gear has not yet been hit by the tidal wave of the internet, nor by the….. earthquake of good design,” howls Jake Lodwick.

        To specifically mention ‘pro audio gear’ seems like a leap when the app does clearly look like it’s designed for non-music professionals as Jake stated. For the consumer market this is a simple entry way into the world of drum machines to be used as a toy. It’s much closer to Figure than say DM1 or the AIRA. As Peter said, I would like to have seen some more features that would’ve kept me coming back to play with the app. It’s simple and the design is nice, but it does lack some of the variation and customization to keep it from being more than a novelty that I would let my kids play with. All that being said, I’m very eager to see where you take this design and how the app evolves going forward.

        • aaron

          “The world of pro audio gear has not yet been hit by the tidal wave of the internet”
          …what a complete baloney sandwich. The net hit pro-audio harder and earlier than almost any other artform outside of image work. It is a primary reason why things are 1000x cheaper than they were in the 80s/90s and why there are thousands of successful boutiqe instrument/interface/hardware/software companies..hell many of those are now industry leaders. Asthetics were hit upon instruments, particularly electronic ones, to INSANE degrees due to their virtual competitors. One could go on and on about this. So much hyperbole to that statement for a simple practice session drum machine that it would easily put most people off (non-professional and non-hobbyists alike).

          • foljs

            You seem to conflate “internet” with instrument/fx plugins, digital DAWs and the like.

            Those two things are different. The “primary reason why things are 1000x cheaper than they were in the 80s/90s” is software instruments and such, not the internet.

          • No, that’s right – I actually agree that we haven’t seen app design significantly use the Internet. On the other hand, I think the rise in popularity of something like Ableton Live has a lot to do with word of mouth, which has a lot to do with the Internet.

            No, my primary problem here is that he makes that claim in an interview, but then the app he ships fails to have sharing.

            Later on, they go on about how building sharing could transform the app – but they haven’t done it yet. It doesn’t matter until you ship. And other developers have tread all of this before, sometimes with reasonable success. (Smule, for instance.)

          • aaron

            It’s one and the same. The proliferation and independent success of audio software and the drop in prices thanks to increased popularity and the used market is not inseperable from the internet. Electronic in general in mainstream culture, from the gear to the sounds created, is almost wholly influenced by the internet culture in this current era.

          • foljs

            Not really. In one sense, of course it’s influenced by the internet, since everything else is (they market plugins through the internet, talk to us users in forums, etc).

            But not in the sense that he’s meaning it. For a pro audio company it’s basically business as usual, it just that sales (and not even all of them) happen over the internet.

          • aaron

            Your comments are not in response or contrary to anything I’ve said. I’m not talking about marketing, forums, or sales methodology.

          • foljs

            “””You can keep repeating your off topic point about sales and keep ignoring the point at hand which is about ui, interface, new gear for new uses, hell..even marketing, and so on”””

            You seem confused and sound incoherent.

            For one, my point about sales is not “off topic”. You said apps were “wholly influenced by the internet” and I replied that the only major internet influence was in how they are sold, Not in their UI or other behavior (with very few and far between exceptions).

            You might agree or disagree with that, but it’s totally on topic.

            And Peter (Kirn, our host here) seems to agree on this: “we haven’t seen app design significantly use the Internet. “.

            Can you point any major audio plugin, DAW etc feature that was inspired by the internet or that makes great use of the internet? You might find one such feature. I doubt you’ll be able to find 2 or 3. The only example is some meagre sharing capabilities — and those are ho-hum and not really widely used anyway.

            So this idea that music apps are “wholly influenced by the internet” is bollocks. If you just mean that the people who create them and the people who use them also use the internet, or that companies provide support for their software over it, big deal. That doesn’t show any major connection to how the apps OPERATE.

          • aaron

            Yes really. You can keep repeating your off topic point about sales and keep ignoring the point at hand which is about ui, interface, new gear for new uses, hell..even marketing, and so on, but that doesnt invalidate a word I’ve said. The whole think stinks of “new thinking” where there is Zero be delivered in the topic at hand. If you like BS I’m sure theres some timeshares out there to purchase…somewhere..

      • lodsb

        Ola Peter,
        the point you raise is pretty important, in the filed of HCI/musicology (digital luthery) it is simply called “pathway from novice to expert performance”. recent publications in that field argue a lot about that “dumbing” musical instruments down is actually one of the worst things you can do because exactly of the point you make: it does not foster creative engagement beyond the initial buzz. or put differently, never strip functions that are a core concept of the respective musical expression. it is also an issue for collaborative music making environments where musical engagement is usually just argued with lowered thresholds – to get people with different expertises together- but apparently, that’s only one side of the medal (?expression). the violin is for example a nice counter argument, you can get as mad and virtuosic as paganini, but as a beginner without any musical experience you can always get *some* sound out of it and start engaging with the thing. of course, it doesnt have to be that way, since digital instruments can be adaptive – and that would be “disruptive”, to use the verge lingo (there are however not many publications digging in that area).

        • foljs

          Most HCI research is bogus grand-eating BS, OTOH, at least in European universities that I know of.

      • Ted Pallas

        The interview with Verge makes it look like the goal of Keezy is to eliminate the learning curve. I’m not saying that “making beats should need a degree from Dubspot,” but the relationship between goals and skill level is what motivates the adoption of new techniques. Eventually, learning new techniques becomes deriving new techniques – this is literally what innovation is. “WTF moments” are rarely more than very-temporary setbacks, and when one comes up that takes more than a quick Google search or manual-flip to solve there’s a good chance that you’re looking at something that’ll push you to your next plateau.

        By taking the complexity out, you’re taking future-agency away from your users and that’s pretty lame. Making great music is as difficult as making great writing, great film or great budget spreadsheets. Greatness is hard, period – I’m worried for what 2040 will look like, when we’re encouraging our peers and collaborators to think “ease it” rather than “overcome it.” Computers are Infinite Possibility Generators, but I’m hearing more and more often people thinking of them as “magic boxes.” We’re the magic, though…

      • foljs

        “””No, I don’t think you read my criticism. The problem isn’t that it’s a different audience, the problem is that it is failing to ask some key questions. There isn’t a way to adjust sounds. There isn’t a way to vary patterns. There isn’t a way to share your work.”””

        Or, put another way “No wireless. Less space than a Nomad. Lame”.

        (Slashdot owner’s famous –and much laughed upon– reaction to the original iPod).

        So, what? It’s an app for people just having some fun making their first beats.

        Adjusting sounds and varying patterns is the next step — if they come to that. And when those average Joe users do get to that, there would be a 1.2 or 1.5 of the app out which will be able to do those things.

        • Try the app. People who like their beats discover that the only button is … a delete button.

          So if they like what they’ve made, they get frustrated and they’ll never use the app again.

          Sorry, “save” is not a nerdy, advanced feature.

          Before the iPod, a lot of other music players failed because they simply didn’t hold enough songs. And the original iPod had a wide range of fairly powerful functions, in fact. The new iPod – erm, iPhone – *very much has wireless*. Arbitrarily removing features doesn’t make something instantly better.

          Try a different example.

  • We like CDM, some of us are regular readers. But we didn’t reach out to cover the Drummer launch because it’s the wrong target audience.

    We’re not going for people who read about new music apps or have ever heard of AIRA. We’re going for a very broad audience. Children, dancers, musicians who find real drum machines too confusing.

    As we evolve the app, new features will be integrated that will make it increasingly useful to nerds like us. Creating your own kit, exporting beats, Inter-App Audio / Audiobus, etc. It’s obvious that those are crucial, but we still have to figure out how to add them in a way that doesn’t compromise the basic simplicity.

    • No, I don’t think you read my criticism. The problem isn’t that it’s a different audience, the problem is that it is failing to ask some key questions.

      There isn’t a way to adjust sounds.

      There isn’t a way to vary patterns.

      There isn’t a way to share your work.

      In fact, adding something like Audiobus before considering more fundamental questions is the last thing I would advise.

      The first instrument I ever learned was a piano. Over three *decades* later, I’m still playing it. Children, dancers, and musicians are the first people who deserve those kinds of instruments.

      I don’t do what I do “for nerds” or for specialists. I do it because I’ve had a lifetime involvement in music, and I believe that design – *especially* the most simple designs – should serve that same amount of depth.

      Now, if something is intended as a toy or a diversion, that’s fine. But the interview with The Verge has you taking on the music instruments industry. And I think we should actually raise the expectations here – the music instruments industry should be subjected to the same demands of simplicity and elegance, just as a simple UX for music ought to be expected to provide rewards longer than a couple of minutes. And I felt Drummer (and Keezy) were good enough as starting points to be worth criticizing.

      • Are We Not Men?

        I think both sides have valid points, yet this one quote from The Verge article gives Peter’s criticisms some more strength:

        “The world of pro audio gear has not yet been hit by the tidal wave of the internet, nor by the….. earthquake of good design,” howls Jake Lodwick.

        To specifically mention ‘pro audio gear’ seems like a leap when the app does clearly look like it’s designed for non-music professionals as Jake stated. For the consumer market this is a simple entry way into the world of drum machines to be used as a toy. It’s much closer to Figure than say DM1 or the AIRA. As Peter said, I would like to have seen some more features that would’ve kept me coming back to play with the app. It’s simple and the design is nice, but it does lack some of the variation and customization to keep it from being more than a novelty that I would let my kids play with. All that being said, I’m very eager to see where you take this design and how the app evolves going forward.

        • aaron

          “The world of pro audio gear has not yet been hit by the tidal wave of the internet”
          …what a complete baloney sandwich. The net hit pro-audio harder and earlier than almost any other artform outside of image work. It is a primary reason why things are 1000x cheaper than they were in the 80s/90s and why there are thousands of successful boutiqe instrument/interface/hardware/software companies..hell many of those are now industry leaders. Asthetics were hit upon instruments, particularly electronic ones, to INSANE degrees due to their virtual competitors. One could go on and on about this. So much hyperbole to that statement for a simple practice session drum machine that it would easily put most people off (non-professional and non-hobbyists alike).

          Not to mention – simple/non-customizable, basic, drum machines were the first of those to hit app stores many years ago.. there are so many already out there with decent UIs, for free, that such amount of focus on a product this late in the game seems silly.

          • foljs

            You seem to conflate “internet” with instrument/fx plugins, digital DAWs and the like.

            Those two things are different. The “primary reason why things are 1000x cheaper than they were in the 80s/90s” is software instruments and such, not the internet.

          • No, that’s right – I actually agree that we haven’t seen app design significantly use the Internet. On the other hand, I think the rise in popularity of something like Ableton Live has a lot to do with word of mouth, which has a lot to do with the Internet.

            No, my primary problem here is that he makes that claim in an interview, but then the app he ships fails to have sharing.

            Later on, they go on about how building sharing could transform the app – but they haven’t done it yet. It doesn’t matter until you ship. And other developers have tread all of this before, sometimes with reasonable success. (Smule, for instance.)

          • aaron

            It’s one and the same. The proliferation and independent success of audio software and the drop in prices thanks to increased popularity and the used market is not inseperable from the internet. Electronic in general in mainstream culture, from the gear to the sounds created, is almost wholly influenced by the internet culture in this current era.

          • foljs

            Not really. In one sense, of course it’s influenced by the internet, since everything else is (they market plugins through the internet, talk to us users in forums, etc).

            But not in the sense that he’s meaning it. For a pro audio company it’s basically business as usual, it just that sales (and not even all of them) happen over the internet.

          • aaron

            Your comments are not in response or contrary to anything I’ve said. I’m not talking about marketing, forums, or sales methodology.

          • foljs

            “””You can keep repeating your off topic point about sales and keep ignoring the point at hand which is about ui, interface, new gear for new uses, hell..even marketing, and so on”””

            You seem confused and incoherent.

            For one, my point about sales is not “off topic”. You said apps were “wholly influenced by the internet” and I replied that the only major internet influence was in how they are sold, Not in their UI or other behavior (with very few and far between exceptions).

            You might agree or disagree with that, but it’s totally on topic.

            And Peter (Kirn, our host here) seems to agree on this: “we haven’t seen app design significantly use the Internet. “.

            Can you point any major audio plugin, DAW etc feature that was inspired by the internet or that makes great use of the internet? You might find one such feature. I doubt you’ll be able to find 2 or 3. The only example is some meagre sharing capabilities — and those are ho-hum and not really widely used anyway.

            So this idea that music apps are “wholly influenced by the internet” is bollocks. If you just mean that the people who create them and the people who use them also use the internet, or that companies provide support for their software over it, big deal. That doesn’t show any major connection to how the apps OPERATE.

          • aaron

            Yes really. You can keep repeating your off topic point about sales and keep ignoring the point at hand which is about ui, interface, new gear for new uses, hell..even marketing, and so on, but that doesnt invalidate a word I’ve said. The whole think stinks of “new thinking” where there is Zero be delivered in the topic at hand. If you like BS I’m sure theres some timeshares out there to purchase…somewhere..

      • lodsb

        Ola Peter,
        the point you raise is pretty important, in the filed of HCI/musicology (digital luthery) it is simply called “pathway from novice to expert performance”. recent publications in that field argue a lot about that “dumbing” musical instruments down is actually one of the worst things you can do because exactly of the point you make: it does not foster creative engagement beyond the initial buzz. or put differently, never strip functions that are a core concept of the respective musical expression. it is also an issue for collaborative music making environments where musical engagement is usually just argued with lowered thresholds – to get people with different expertises together- but apparently, that’s only one side of the medal (?expression). the violin is for example a nice counter argument, you can get as mad and virtuosic as paganini, but as a beginner without any musical experience you can always get *some* sound out of it and start engaging with the thing. of course, it doesnt have to be that way, since digital instruments can be adaptive – and that would be “disruptive”, to use the verge lingo (there are however not many publications digging in that area).

        • foljs

          Most HCI research is bogus grand-eating BS, OTOH, at least in European universities that I know of.

      • Ted Pallas

        The interview with Verge makes it look like the goal of Keezy is to eliminate the learning curve. I’m not saying that “making beats should need a degree from Dubspot,” but the relationship between goals and skill level is what motivates the adoption of new techniques. Eventually, learning new techniques becomes deriving new techniques – this is literally what innovation is. “WTF moments” are rarely more than very-temporary setbacks, and when one comes up that takes more than a quick Google search or manual-flip to solve there’s a good chance that you’re looking at something that’ll push you to your next plateau.

        By taking the complexity out, you’re taking future-agency away from your users and that’s pretty lame. Making great music is as difficult as making great writing, great film or great budget spreadsheets. Greatness is hard, period – I’m worried for what 2040 will look like, when we’re encouraging our peers and collaborators to think “ease it” rather than “overcome it.” Computers are Infinite Possibility Generators, but I’m hearing more and more often people thinking of them as “magic boxes.” We’re the magic, though…

      • foljs

        “””No, I don’t think you read my criticism. The problem isn’t that it’s a different audience, the problem is that it is failing to ask some key questions. There isn’t a way to adjust sounds. There isn’t a way to vary patterns. There isn’t a way to share your work.”””

        Or, put another way “No wireless. Less space than a Nomad. Lame”.

        (Slashdot owner’s famous –and much laughed upon– reaction to the original iPod).

        So, what? It’s an app for people just having some fun making their first beats.

        Adjusting sounds and varying patterns is the next step — if they come to that. And when those average Joe users do get to that, there would be a 1.2 or 1.5 of the app out which will be able to do those things.

        • Try the app. People who like their beats discover that the only button is … a delete button.

          So if they like what they’ve made, they get frustrated and they’ll never use the app again.

          Sorry, “save” is not a nerdy, advanced feature.

          Before the iPod, a lot of other music players failed because they simply didn’t hold enough songs. And the original iPod had a wide range of fairly powerful functions, in fact. The new iPod – erm, iPhone – *very much has wireless*. Arbitrarily removing features doesn’t make something instantly better.

          Try a different example.

  • josh

    Questions this raises for me, while I sit here with my Android device unable to try this app:

    What’s the business model? Free usually doesn’t last.

    What does this do that similar minimal apps don’t? Does this iterate on design lessons from Figure? Does it outperform nanoloop despite having the same core interface and fewer features?

  • josh

    Questions this raises for me, while I sit here with my Android device unable to try this app:

    What’s the business model? Free usually doesn’t last.

    What does this do that similar minimal apps don’t? Does this iterate on design lessons from Figure? Does it outperform nanoloop despite having the same core interface and fewer features?

  • Virtual Flannel

    Really great article. Nice to see some progressive critical thinking Peter.

  • Virtual Flannel

    Really great article. Nice to see some progressive critical thinking Peter.

  • Will

    Good article, Peter and good comments, Internet. Thank you.

    My initial thought was ‘I dunno. Seems like a nicely executed on-brand app for them’. Now I’m conflicted.

    There is room in the world for music toys. I like playing my kid’s 8 tine pentatonic xylophone. Same for shakers, toy pianos and 5 hole flutes and all that good time stuff. And for sure, people have used all of these things with all of their limitations to create great expressive music. Someone will make something great with Drummer.

    Part of @lodsb’s point in particular struck home though:
    > … “dumbing” musical instruments down is actually one of the worst things you can do because exactly of the point you make: it does not foster creative engagement beyond the initial buzz. or put differently, never strip functions that are a core concept of the respective musical expression.

    My 6 year old gets how to work a drum machine. She loves to use Loopy. No, she doesn’t know how to map either to a MIDI controller. That’s not getting in her way of creating and enjoying the creation of music though.

    > Or to quote Alfred North Whitehead – and this may even better apply to iOS developers – “seek simplicity, and distrust it.”

    ^ this. Making simple ≠ dumbing down. I’m all for making rich and complex things accessible so I hope Keezy marches on in its quest. But simply removing expressive features is, well, cheating. 🙂

    If the point of this app is to redefine drum machines, or the way people make beat oriented music, er, keep at it! If the point is to make an accessible musical drum machine toy, I think it’s a fine piece of work. It isn’t more accessible than quite a few other iOS drum apps even if it is better branded.

    Edit: Just read the article on Verge. Ugh, what an annoying read. Not sure I’m ready to blame the Verge’s make-clickbait-crap on Keezy though.

  • Will

    Good article, Peter and good comments, Internet. Thank you.

    My initial thought was ‘I dunno. Seems like a nicely executed on-brand app for them’. Now I’m conflicted.

    There is room in the world for music toys. I like playing my kid’s 8 tine pentatonic xylophone. Same for shakers, toy pianos and 5 hole flutes and all that good time stuff. And for sure, people have used all of these things with all of their limitations to create great expressive music. Someone will make something great with Drummer.

    Part of @lodsb’s point in particular struck home though:
    > … “dumbing” musical instruments down is actually one of the worst things you can do because exactly of the point you make: it does not foster creative engagement beyond the initial buzz. or put differently, never strip functions that are a core concept of the respective musical expression.

    My 6 year old gets how to work a drum machine. She loves to use Loopy. No, she doesn’t know how to map either to a MIDI controller. That’s not getting in her way of creating and enjoying the creation of music though.

    > Or to quote Alfred North Whitehead – and this may even better apply to iOS developers – “seek simplicity, and distrust it.”

    ^ this. Making simple ≠ dumbing down. I’m all for making rich and complex things accessible so I hope Keezy marches on in its quest. But simply removing expressive features is, well, cheating. 🙂

    If the point of this app is to redefine drum machines, or the way people make beat oriented music, er, keep at it! If the point is to make an accessible musical drum machine toy, I think it’s a fine piece of work. It isn’t more accessible than quite a few other iOS drum apps even if it is better branded.

    Edit: Just read the article on Verge. Ugh, what an annoying read. Not sure I’m ready to blame the Verge’s make-clickbait-crap on Keezy though.

  • Looks remarkably similar, but a lot less feature rich, than those old iDrum apps from 5 years ago. Really don’t understand who they are building these apps for.

  • Looks remarkably similar, but a lot less feature rich, than those old iDrum apps from 5 years ago. Really don’t understand who they are building these apps for.

  • I feel what you say, and I am pretty concerned in searching ways to interface with sound in a sensitive and expressive way as I’ve been working on a drum app too in the past months.

    I can see the use of something like Drummer, but my concern is when you take off too much of the control you take off the possibility to get really good at it too.

    Don’t want to say my work is better, I’m maybe a better sound designer and a much worse programmer.

    Though I think like them that it’s important to focus on simplicity because it allows to build something where technology is transparent (the filling of steps by sliding in Drummer seems awesome to me) and so the flow of creation is uninterrupted when it matters.

    If your interested in a goofy sensitive drum app you can check it at http://flexyvoid.com

    • Will

      Flexy Drummer is a perfect counterpoint, pun proudly intended, to this article.

  • I feel what you say, and I am pretty concerned in searching ways to interface with sound in a sensitive and expressive way as I’ve been working on a drum app too in the past months.

    I can see the use of something like Drummer, but my concern is when you take off too much of the control you take off the possibility to get really good at it too.

    Don’t want to say my work is better, I’m maybe a better sound designer and a much worse programmer.

    Though I think like them that it’s important to focus on simplicity because it allows to build something where technology is transparent (the filling of steps by sliding in Drummer seems awesome to me) and so the flow of creation is uninterrupted when it matters.

    If your interested in a goofy sensitive drum app you can check it at http://flexyvoid.com/apps/flexydrum/

    • Will

      Flexy Drummer is a perfect counterpoint, pun proudly intended, to this article.

  • ann

    I’ve just finished reading this article written by Ean Golden from DJ Tech Tool: http://www.djtechtools.com/2014/10/31/no-wrong-notes-is-that-a-good-thing/

    And then I read this article.

    Just want to say THANK YOU Peter… 😉

  • ann

    I’ve just finished reading this article written by Ean Golden from DJ Tech Tool: http://www.djtechtools.com/2014/10/31/no-wrong-notes-is-that-a-good-thing/

    And then I read this article.

    Just want to say THANK YOU Peter… 😉

  • lala

    Bring out the gimp and lest get freaky,
    I have tons of simple apps like this from years ago,
    Who cares about them now?
    We now have a7 and a8 chips, and a8aax with 2 gig of ram.
    The iPad air can crunch as many numbers as the MacBook Air.
    Hello ableton, we are looking at you.

    • lala

      iPad air 2 of course

  • lala

    Bring out the gimp and lest get freaky,
    I have tons of simple apps like this from years ago,
    Who cares about them now?
    We now have a7 and a8 chips, and a8aax with 2 gig of ram.
    The iPad air can crunch as many numbers as the MacBook Air.
    Hello ableton, we are looking at you.

    • lala

      iPad air 2 of course

  • slightlydetuned

    Propellerhead Software’s Take is another option in this application area: http://www.propellerheads.se/products/take/

  • slightlydetuned

    Propellerhead Software’s Take is another option in this application area: http://www.propellerheads.se/products/take/