“But I don’t have enough time.”

So, get a camera crew from FACT to loom behind you and watch while you produce, all with a clever ten-minute clock ticking away for their series Against The Clock.

Actually, no. Two problems. One, the pressure might make you completely freeze up. Two, yes, you might not have FACT around.

But you could imagine a timer. Deft, the aptly-named Croydon, UK artist whose work ranges from cinematic and ambient straight through to footwork, here goes a bit modern drum and bass in a perfectly passable track that he assembles under the clock. Got to hand it to him for that.

And his tool of choice is one that gets far too little attention around these parts: ancient-in-computer-years Windows stalwart FL Studio aka “Fruity Loops.” FL gets extra points here for putting useful samplers and other instruments right front and center, building in a step sequencer, and generally getting you making music right away. Even doing it all with a mouse doesn’t look so awkward. FL users, maybe you can spot something clever in here, but mostly I think it’ll warm your hearts.

The tool:
http://www.image-line.com/flstudio/

The story:
http://www.factmag.com/2014/12/10/against-the-clock-deft/

And here’s the really beautiful material Deft makes with more time. Grimy rhythms, sophisticated grooves, set against a massively-deep soundscape – cavernous ambiences somehow never wind up getting crowded. (And if they can survive being squashed on SoundCloud, I can’t wait to hear them on vinyl and lossless digital.) From the always-smart label Project Mooncircle:

More more lo-fi, broken beat, entrancing gems from Deft are available via his Bandcamp:

And SoundCloud:

Thanks to Joel Bernstein, wrangler of the CDM reboot we’re wrapping over the holidays.

Yes, Virginia, kids still use Fruity Loops.

You can do anything. Whip out a track. Croydon style.

  • Shoot, I can see why people like FL Studio for MIDI. I do a lot of MIDI in Reaper and it seems pretty primitive at times. I can’t really afford anything else at the moment, though.

    • regend

      My first tracks with Reaper were good learning experiences. When i am doing mobile recording I still use Reaper and my Apogee Duet.

  • Shoot, I can see why people like FL Studio for MIDI. I do a lot of MIDI in Reaper and it seems pretty primitive at times. I can’t really afford anything else at the moment, though.

    • regend

      My first tracks with Reaper were good learning experiences. When i am doing mobile recording I still use Reaper and my Apogee Duet.

  • Shoot, I can see why people like FL Studio for MIDI. I do a lot of MIDI in Reaper and it seems pretty primitive at times. I can’t really afford anything else at the moment, though.

    • regend

      My first tracks with Reaper were good learning experiences. When i am doing mobile recording I still use Reaper and my Apogee Duet.

  • Rocketpilot

    The number one thing I miss when I switched to OS X from Windows 8 years ago. Maybe there’ll be a real OS X port in a year or so.

    • Octopus Empire
      • Rocketpilot

        I know about that, but I’m not exactly holding my breath, you know?

        • Right, but it seems after that experiment they’re doing a proper port. Maybe the Crossover version gave them an indication of the level of demand.

          • Will

            Think Mac sales going up year over year while all other PC sales are going down may have had something to do with it. 🙂 I’m sure the ‘No Mac Ever’ thing wasn’t (entirely) religion: it was technical feasibility. Now that Delphi’s compiling to OSX is getting reliable, why *wouldn’t* they try to position the app where a large chunk of the young and/or music making audience is?

            Also, and this is just me wishing out loud on the Internet: Delphi is also supporting iOS now. Once they get the bones of the app to work on OSX…

    • Will

      Looks like an actual port (not a wrapped windows app) is in the works, in earnest this time.

      https://support.image-line.com/knowledgebase/base.php?ans=114

  • Rocketpilot

    The number one thing I miss when I switched to OS X from Windows 8 years ago. Maybe there’ll be a real OS X port in a year or so.

    • Octopus Empire
      • Rocketpilot

        I know about that, but I’m not exactly holding my breath, you know?

        edit: oh, the crossover version. Yes, I’ve used it, but it hasn’t been updated in over a year and it really isn’t good. They’ve also announced a native version, coming … at some point.

        • Right, but it seems after that experiment they’re doing a proper port. Maybe the Crossover version gave them an indication of the level of demand.

          • Will

            Think Mac sales going up year over year while all other PC sales are going down may have had something to do with it. 🙂 I’m sure the ‘No Mac Ever’ thing wasn’t (entirely) religion: it was technical feasibility. Now that Delphi’s compiling to OSX is getting reliable, why *wouldn’t* they try to position the app where a large chunk of the young and/or music making audience is?

            Also, and this is just me wishing out loud on the Internet: Delphi is also supporting iOS now. Once they get the bones of the app to work on OSX…

    • Will

      Looks like an actual port (not a wrapped windows app) is in the works, in earnest this time.

      https://support.image-line.com/knowledgebase/base.php?ans=114

  • Rocketpilot

    The number one thing I miss when I switched to OS X from Windows 8 years ago. Maybe there’ll be a real OS X port in a year or so.

      • Rocketpilot

        I know about that, but I’m not exactly holding my breath, you know?

        edit: oh, the crossover version. Yes, I’ve used it, but it hasn’t been updated in over a year and it really isn’t good. They’ve also announced a native version, coming … at some point.

        • Right, but it seems after that experiment they’re doing a proper port. Maybe the Crossover version gave them an indication of the level of demand.

          • Will

            Think Mac sales going up year over year while all other PC sales are going down may have had something to do with it. 🙂 I’m sure the ‘No Mac Ever’ thing wasn’t (entirely) religion: it was technical feasibility. Now that Delphi’s compiling to OSX is getting reliable, why *wouldn’t* they try to position the app where a large chunk of the young and/or music making audience is?

            Also, and this is just me wishing out loud on the Internet: Delphi is also supporting iOS now. Once they get the bones of the app to work on OSX…

    • Will

      Looks like an actual port (not a wrapped windows app) is in the works, in earnest this time.

      https://support.image-line.com/knowledgebase/base.php?ans=114

  • Million Zillion Billion

    In ten minutes… after a million, zillion, billion hours of experience getting to that point!

    • Ha, though it doesn’t take *that* long to learn FL Studio. 😉

    • NRGuest

      Not to mention all the setup work he did ahead of time with samples, loading tracks, effects, etc. 🙂

  • Million Zillion Billion

    In ten minutes… after a million, zillion, billion hours of experience getting to that point!

    • Ha, though it doesn’t take *that* long to learn FL Studio. 😉

    • NRGuest

      Not to mention all the setup work he did ahead of time with samples, loading tracks, effects, etc. 🙂

  • Million Zillion Billion

    In ten minutes… after a million, zillion, billion hours of experience getting to that point!

    • Ha, though it doesn’t take *that* long to learn FL Studio. 😉

    • NRGuest

      Not to mention all the setup work he did ahead of time with samples, loading tracks, effects, etc. 🙂

  • Nikolozi

    Nice work. My favourite Against The Clock video is the one with Mathew Jonson
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xepdHwUvC3E&list=PLg5ScSqSDXsvXVvNqW42AjfOmPjIupYZH&spfreload=10

  • Nikolozi

    Nice work. My favourite Against The Clock video is the one with Mathew Jonson
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xepdHwUvC3E&list=PLg5ScSqSDXsvXVvNqW42AjfOmPjIupYZH&spfreload=10

  • Nikolozi

    Nice work. My favourite Against The Clock video is the one with Mathew Jonson
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xepdHwUvC3E&list=PLg5ScSqSDXsvXVvNqW42AjfOmPjIupYZH&spfreload=10

  • aaron

    This is also a good example demonstrating why so much of electronic music is disposable, formulaic, and uninteresting.

    • BitLion

      so much = basically only the pop music you hear on the radio + mainstream big room house.

      and you probably disregarded 93 percent of all EDM…

      • aaron

        “EDM”, yes. I avoid anything labeling itself EDM like its a dump fire.

    • Did you listen to the records linked below? Because I didn’t find them at all disposable or formulaic.

      I find many comments disposable, formulaic, and uninteresting, because people don’t actually open their ears and listen past a genre to hear what’s really going on. Not everyone does their best work in a ten-minute timespan, but he got something out there – which means he has the chops to get ideas down, and can then develop them into something more.

      • aaron

        Hang on, my words came out a bit rougher than I intended. I was mocking the 10 minute premise here, not Deft’s output. I hold nothing against his music and quite like it. Rather than add more noise, I think ElectroB more or less summed up what I tried to get at with 1 sentence.

        • Million Zillion Billion

          I think this swings more the other way. Electronic music kind of lends itself to over-analyzing, micromanaging, getting lost in the process… Where, you know, getting a jam going, getting some spontaneity, can be exactly what we need.

          Not that all music should be done in 10 minutes, but more that exercises like this can be a healthy counter-balance.

          • aaron

            As excersize yes, I’m with you on that…don’t think anyone would disagree.

    • donald

      The formulaic part of electronic music does annoy me, big name artist using the same formula to make every song sound the same. but that doesn’t mean there isnt good stuff out there..

      • heinrichz

        very annoying indeed

    • NRGuest

      If all you have is 10 minutes it would be a miracle for whatever you write to not be formulaic. If you swapped the DAW for a guitar I’m sure the result would be a generic singer-songwriter type track that stuck to basic chords.

      • ElectroB

        Charlie Hunter, american fusion jazz guitarist, coming up with something in 5 minutes. Not your typical generic singer-songwriter stuff. Just sayin’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U33AsY5H_Ds

        • vroom lao phen

          Right, true. I actually really like your comment above. Still and just to play devil’s advocate – while this is much different from generic singer-songwriter stuff, it’s still something that a jazz guitar enthusiast (which I am not) might call less than completely original. It’s got a funk jazz rhythm… I’m sure there are scales and modes involved that he uses… kinda like building blocks that are moved around. Very complex building blocks, but still.

    • ElectroB

      I think aaron is being a bit harsh, but he also has a point.

      Deft is clearly a good producer and the end result is interesting and
      shows potential, but it is rather formulaic – repetitive loop-based
      music, like most electronic music created in the last 30 years or so. Some of
      it is excellent. Most is… not.

      I think we also have to consider:
      1) the limitations of these genres (EDM, electronica, etc.) and media use to create them; it is very hard to improvise and create non-linear, non-loop based structures on the spot with computer tools, you always need to do some homework creating loops or virtual instruments that you can then manipulate physically with MIDI controllers, keyboards, etc. (which also means you have to be able to play them to create something interesting). Otherwise you most likely will end up with
      a) repetitive loops
      or
      b) static drones

      2)l have a problem with the video’s implied 10 minute-from-scratch premise –
      he builds up some sounds and MIDI melodic / harmonic lines pretty quickly (and efficiently I might add) but he also uses several pre-recorded and pre-produced loops and samples. What constitutes “from scratch” then? Maybe applying the 10-minute premise to this type of music creation is not very honest. His finished tracks on the Soundcloud players (which definitely took a lot longer to create) are clearly more evolved and interesting than the end product of this 10 minute challenge.

  • aaron

    This is also a good example demonstrating why so much of electronic music is disposable, formulaic, and uninteresting.

    • BitLion

      so much = basically only the pop music you hear on the radio + mainstream big room house.

      and you probably disregarded 93 percent of all EDM…

      • aaron

        “EDM”, yes. I avoid anything labeling itself EDM like its a dump fire.

    • Did you listen to the records linked below? Because I didn’t find them at all disposable or formulaic.

      I find many comments disposable, formulaic, and uninteresting, because people don’t actually open their ears and listen past a genre to hear what’s really going on. Not everyone does their best work in a ten-minute timespan, but he got something out there – which means he has the chops to get ideas down, and can then develop them into something more.

      • aaron

        Hang on, my words came out a bit rougher than I intended. I was mocking the 10 minute premise here, not Deft’s output. I hold nothing against his music and quite like it. Rather than add more noise, I think ElectroB more or less summed up what I tried to get at with 1 sentence.

        • Million Zillion Billion

          I think this swings more the other way. Electronic music kind of lends itself to over-analyzing, micromanaging, getting lost in the process… Where, you know, getting a jam going, getting some spontaneity, can be exactly what we need.

          Not that all music should be done in 10 minutes, but more that exercises like this can be a healthy counter-balance.

          • aaron

            As excersize yes, I’m with you on that…don’t think anyone would disagree.

    • donald

      The formulaic part of electronic music does annoy me, big name artist using the same formula to make every song sound the same. but that doesn’t mean there isnt good stuff out there..

      • heinrichz

        very annoying indeed

    • NRGuest

      If all you have is 10 minutes it would be a miracle for whatever you write to not be formulaic. If you swapped the DAW for a guitar I’m sure the result would be a generic singer-songwriter type track that stuck to basic chords.

      • ElectroB

        Charlie Hunter, american fusion jazz guitarist, coming up with something in 5 minutes. Not your typical generic singer-songwriter stuff. Just sayin’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U33AsY5H_Ds

        • vroom lao phen

          Right, true. I actually really like your comment above. Still and just to play devil’s advocate – while this is much different from generic singer-songwriter stuff, it’s still something that a jazz guitar enthusiast (which I am not) might call less than completely original. It’s got a funk jazz rhythm… I’m sure there are scales and modes involved that he uses… kinda like building blocks that are moved around. Very complex building blocks, but still.

    • ElectroB

      I think aaron is being a bit harsh, but he also has a point.

      Deft is clearly a good producer and the end result is interesting and
      shows potential, but it is rather formulaic – repetitive loop-based
      music, like most electronic music created in the last 30 years or so. Some of
      it is excellent. Most is… not.

      I think we also have to consider:
      1) the limitations of these genres (EDM, electronica, etc.) and the tools/media used to create them; it is very hard to improvise and create non-linear, non-loop based structures on the spot with computer tools, you always need to do some homework creating loops or virtual instruments that you can then manipulate physically with MIDI controllers, keyboards, etc. (which also means you have to be able to play them to create something interesting). Otherwise you most likely will end up with

      a) repetitive loops
      or
      b) static drones

      2)l have a problem with the video’s implied 10 minute-from-scratch premise –
      he builds up some sounds and MIDI melodic / harmonic lines pretty quickly (and efficiently I might add) but he also uses several pre-recorded and pre-produced loops and samples. What constitutes “from scratch” then? Maybe applying the 10-minute premise to this type of music creation is not very honest. His finished tracks on the Soundcloud players (which definitely took a lot longer to create) are clearly more evolved and interesting than the end product of this 10 minute challenge.

  • aaron

    This is also a good example demonstrating why so much of electronic music is disposable, formulaic, and uninteresting.

    • BitLion

      so much = basically only the pop music you hear on the radio + mainstream big room house.

      and you probably disregarded 93 percent of all EDM…

      • aaron

        “EDM”, yes. I avoid anything labeling itself EDM like its a dump fire.

    • Did you listen to the records linked below? Because I didn’t find them at all disposable or formulaic.

      I find many comments disposable, formulaic, and uninteresting, because people don’t actually open their ears and listen past a genre to hear what’s really going on. Not everyone does their best work in a ten-minute timespan, but he got something out there – which means he has the chops to get ideas down, and can then develop them into something more.

      • aaron

        Hang on, my words came out a bit rougher than I intended. I was mocking the 10 minute premise here, not Deft’s output. I hold nothing against his music and quite like it. Rather than add more noise, I think ElectroB more or less summed up what I tried to get at with 1 sentence.

        • Million Zillion Billion

          I think this swings more the other way. Electronic music kind of lends itself to over-analyzing, micromanaging, getting lost in the process… Where, you know, getting a jam going, getting some spontaneity, can be exactly what we need.

          Not that all music should be done in 10 minutes, but more that exercises like this can be a healthy counter-balance.

          • aaron

            As excersize yes, I’m with you on that…don’t think anyone would disagree.

    • donald

      The formulaic part of electronic music does annoy me, big name artist using the same formula to make every song sound the same. but that doesn’t mean there isnt good stuff out there..

      • heinrichz

        very annoying indeed

    • NRGuest

      If all you have is 10 minutes it would be a miracle for whatever you write to not be formulaic. If you swapped the DAW for a guitar I’m sure the result would be a generic singer-songwriter type track that stuck to basic chords.

      • Elekb

        Charlie Hunter, american fusion jazz guitarist, coming up with something in 5 minutes. Not your typical generic singer-songwriter stuff. Just sayin’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U33AsY5H_Ds

        • vroom lao phen

          Right, true. I actually really like your comment above. Still and just to play devil’s advocate – while this is much different from generic singer-songwriter stuff, it’s still something that a jazz guitar enthusiast (which I am not) might call less than completely original. It’s got a funk jazz rhythm… I’m sure there are scales and modes involved that he uses… kinda like building blocks that are moved around. Very complex building blocks, but still.

    • Elekb

      I think aaron is being a bit harsh, but he also has a point.

      Deft is clearly a good producer and the end result is interesting and
      shows potential, but it is rather formulaic – repetitive loop-based
      music, like most electronic music created in the last 30 years or so. Some of
      it is excellent. Most is… not.

      I think we also have to consider:
      1) the limitations of these genres (EDM, electronica, etc.) and the tools/media used to create them; it is very hard to improvise and create non-linear, non-loop based structures on the spot with computer tools, you always need to do some homework creating loops or virtual instruments that you can then manipulate physically with MIDI controllers, keyboards, etc. (which also means you have to be able to play them to create something interesting). Otherwise you most likely will end up with

      a) repetitive loops
      or
      b) static drones

      2)l have a problem with the video’s implied 10 minute-from-scratch premise –
      he builds up some sounds and MIDI melodic / harmonic lines pretty quickly (and efficiently I might add) but he also uses several pre-recorded and pre-produced loops and samples. What constitutes “from scratch” then? Maybe applying the 10-minute premise to this type of music creation is not very honest. His finished tracks on the Soundcloud players (which definitely took a lot longer to create) are clearly more evolved and interesting than the end product of this 10 minute challenge.

  • REGEND

    Ten minute track made with outboard gear:
    init sound Yamaha TX7
    pads from Korg Poly-800
    scratch drumming and phrase from a dirtstyle record (using vestex 2000 and tascam xs-8)

    Recorded using an Apogee Duet v1 to Ableton Live 7.

    Effects used:
    Dub delay

    Filter + Flanger
    Compression on drums
    Compression and Limiter on master track.

    https://soundcloud.com/regend/scratchin-space

    Enjoy!

    I AM REGEND

  • REGEND

    Ten minute track made with outboard gear:
    init sound Yamaha TX7
    pads from Korg Poly-800
    scratch drumming and phrase from a dirtstyle record (using vestex 2000 and tascam xs-8)

    Recorded using an Apogee Duet v1 to Ableton Live 7.

    Effects used:
    Dub delay

    Filter + Flanger
    Compression on drums
    Compression and Limiter on master track.

    https://soundcloud.com/regend/scratchin-space

    Enjoy!

    I AM REGEND

  • REGEND

    Ten minute track made with outboard gear:
    init sound Yamaha TX7
    pads from Korg Poly-800
    scratch drumming and phrase from a dirtstyle record (using vestex 2000 and tascam xs-8)

    Recorded using an Apogee Duet v1 to Ableton Live 7.

    Effects used:
    Dub delay

    Filter + Flanger
    Compression on drums
    Compression and Limiter on master track.

    https://soundcloud.com/regend/scratchin-space

    Enjoy!

    I AM REGEND

  • Jim Aikin

    I can easily spend ten minutes editing the MIDI data for a melody or bass line. Or finding the right preset and tweaking it with the right effects. It always takes me days (sometimes months) to mull over the creative possibilities while developing a piece of music. Personally, I would find a “ten-minute challenge” insulting. But that’s just me. If you can make five minutes’ worth of good music in ten minutes by drag-copying loops, good for you.

  • Jim Aikin

    I can easily spend ten minutes editing the MIDI data for a melody or bass line. Or finding the right preset and tweaking it with the right effects. It always takes me days (sometimes months) to mull over the creative possibilities while developing a piece of music. Personally, I would find a “ten-minute challenge” insulting. But that’s just me. If you can make five minutes’ worth of good music in ten minutes by drag-copying loops, good for you.

  • Jim Aikin

    I can easily spend ten minutes editing the MIDI data for a melody or bass line. Or finding the right preset and tweaking it with the right effects. It always takes me days (sometimes months) to mull over the creative possibilities while developing a piece of music. Personally, I would find a “ten-minute challenge” insulting. But that’s just me. If you can make five minutes’ worth of good music in ten minutes by drag-copying loops, good for you.

  • Seems like a lot of people don’t quite get the idea behind the 10 min challenge. Obviously it’s not to get a finished, original, well produced track. It’s a challenge, an exercise, the electronic musician’s equivalent of working on scales and arpeggios. Just what can you get out of 10 mins? What corners do you have to cut? What makes you lag or what are you good at? These things only help creativity in the long run and I love seeing how other artists work. Whether the result is good or not, I usually learn something watching the process!

  • Seems like a lot of people don’t quite get the idea behind the 10 min challenge. Obviously it’s not to get a finished, original, well produced track. It’s a challenge, an exercise, the electronic musician’s equivalent of working on scales and arpeggios. Just what can you get out of 10 mins? What corners do you have to cut? What makes you lag or what are you good at? These things only help creativity in the long run and I love seeing how other artists work. Whether the result is good or not, I usually learn something watching the process!

  • Seems like a lot of people don’t quite get the idea behind the 10 min challenge. Obviously it’s not to get a finished, original, well produced track. It’s a challenge, an exercise, the electronic musician’s equivalent of working on scales and arpeggios. Just what can you get out of 10 mins? What corners do you have to cut? What makes you lag or what are you good at? These things only help creativity in the long run and I love seeing how other artists work. Whether the result is good or not, I usually learn something watching the process!

  • Will

    This is impressive. I have spent considerably more than 10 minutes dicking around with hi-hat sounds. And I know I’m not alone! I’m going to try this this weekend.

  • Will

    This is impressive. I have spent considerably more than 10 minutes dicking around with hi-hat sounds. And I know I’m not alone! I’m going to try this this weekend.

  • Will

    This is impressive. I have spent considerably more than 10 minutes dicking around with hi-hat sounds. And I know I’m not alone! I’m going to try this this weekend.

  • Rancid Stu

    What people create, is what they create. They aren’t creating it on your sole behalf. So why take issue and fling insults?

    Electronic music in general is rooted in formulas and sequences. If Deft created something totally outta left-field, someone, somewhere would have emerged from the woodwork to pan it for not following a formula and being something to the tune of “unlistenable” “uninformed” “dreck.” Nonconstructive critics on the internet will always find something to chastise with safe, shallow vitriol.

    It is easier to tear down & destroy than it is to create.

  • Rancid Stu

    What people create, is what they create. They aren’t creating it on your sole behalf. So why take issue and fling insults?

    Electronic music in general is rooted in formulas and sequences. If Deft created something totally outta left-field, someone, somewhere would have emerged from the woodwork to pan it for not following a formula and being something to the tune of “unlistenable” “uninformed” “dreck.” Nonconstructive critics on the internet will always find something to chastise with safe, shallow vitriol.

    It is easier to tear down & destroy than it is to create.

  • Rancid Stu

    What people create, is what they create. They aren’t creating it on your sole behalf. So why take issue and fling insults?

    Electronic music in general is rooted in formulas and sequences. If Deft created something totally outta left-field, someone, somewhere would have emerged from the woodwork to pan it for not following a formula and being something to the tune of “unlistenable” “uninformed” “dreck.” Nonconstructive critics on the internet will always find something to chastise with safe, shallow vitriol.

    It is easier to tear down & destroy than it is to create.

  • Raffa van der Koont

    Yet another example of someone using a pirate copy of Sylenth1 !

  • Raffa van der Koont

    Yet another example of someone using a pirate copy of Sylenth1 !

  • Raffa van der Koont

    Yet another example of someone using a pirate copy of Sylenth1 !

  • Matthew

    Deft is all business. I love how clean his drums sound. To echo everyone else, the real time put in here is in picking out all these samples & processing them, dialing in the synth sounds, doing your FX routing and mixing… Although an artificial deadline certainly helps you make those decisions faster. Is there something like nanowrimo for electronic music?

  • Deft is all business. I love how clean his drums sound. To echo everyone else, the real time put in here is in picking out all these samples & processing them, dialing in the synth sounds, doing your FX routing and mixing… Although an artificial deadline certainly helps you make those decisions faster. Is there something like nanowrimo for electronic music?

  • Deft is all business. I love how clean his drums sound. To echo everyone else, the real time put in here is in picking out all these samples & processing them, dialing in the synth sounds, doing your FX routing and mixing… Although an artificial deadline certainly helps you make those decisions faster. Is there something like nanowrimo for electronic music?

  • heinrichz

    That exactly is one of the problems plaguing electronic music today. All it takes is to slap together a bunch of presets and press record for five minutes and you do have something that can pass for a track…but who is going to listen? Some of the tracks might actually be nice but they go under in the glut of generic stuff. I think this race to crank out tracks as fast as possible is missing the point, when we should acually enjoy the process with experimentation while not focusing so much on results and time spent in the first place. And thus the main work for the new ‘musician’ became selfpromotion and blowing his own horn on social media etc. Just saying..

  • heinrichz

    That exactly is one of the problems plaguing electronic music today. All it takes is to slap together a bunch of presets and press record for five minutes and you do have something that can pass for a track…but who is going to listen? Some of the tracks might actually be nice but they go under in the glut of generic stuff. I think this race to crank out tracks as fast as possible is missing the point, when we should acually enjoy the process with experimentation while not focusing so much on results and time spent in the first place. And thus the main work for the new ‘musician’ became selfpromotion and blowing his own horn on social media etc. Just saying..

  • heinrichz

    That exactly is one of the problems plaguing electronic music today. All it takes is to slap together a bunch of presets and press record for five minutes and you do have something that can pass for a track…but who is going to listen? Some of the tracks might actually be nice but they go under in the glut of generic stuff. I think this race to crank out tracks as fast as possible is missing the point, when we should acually enjoy the process with experimentation while not focusing so much on results and time spent in the first place. And thus the main work for the new ‘musician’ became selfpromotion and blowing his own horn on social media etc. Just saying..

  • paul spades

    I think FL Studio is still the most widely used DAW. (It was according to an online magazine last year).

    I’ve tried switching to Ableton, really I have. I even have a Launchpad with lauchpad95 (it’s great fun grooving around). But, I still get more work done in Fl with two samplers and a 3xOSC. Granted, loop recording sucks in FL, but I need to tweak my recorded midi anyway.

  • paul spades

    I think FL Studio is still the most widely used DAW. (It was according to an online magazine last year).

    I’ve tried switching to Ableton, really I have. I even have a Launchpad with lauchpad95 (it’s great fun grooving around). But, I still get more work done in Fl with two samplers and a 3xOSC. Granted, loop recording sucks in FL, but I need to tweak my recorded midi anyway.

  • paul spades

    I think FL Studio is still the most widely used DAW. (It was according to an online magazine last year).

    I’ve tried switching to Ableton, really I have. I even have a Launchpad with lauchpad95 (it’s great fun grooving around). But, I still get more work done in Fl with two samplers and a 3xOSC. Granted, loop recording sucks in FL, but I need to tweak my recorded midi anyway.