protoolsfirst

Remember Pro Tools Free?

Years ago, it was then-Digidesign’s ploy to give you the first hit of Pro Tools without paying, in the hopes you’d get hooked and buy the full version. Well, the idea is back, just with a different name. Pro Tools First is a stripped-down version of Pro Tools.

And it’s one of three changes in Pro Tools 12 to how you buy and work with the flagship music production software. Pro Tools 12 is now something you can use for free (with various strings attached). It’s something you can rent, with subscription pricing (in addition to continuing the purchase option). And Pro Tools is connected to Avid Everywhere online offerings intended to help you collaborate and share – with the ability to buy and sell content.

The timing comes as several players in music making software look to new models – as noted earlier this week, Cakewalk is making SONAR available via payment plans as well as providing monthly subscriptions to “membership” in content and updates, and leading cloud collaboration tools (Gobbler and Splice) are serving up solutions for buying or “renting” plug-ins as you work with others.

When Pro Tools 12 arrives further into this year, customers will be able to take advantage of the new pricing model, buy or rent third-party effects and instruments from inside the software, and give new collaboration/marketplace tools a spin.

Free First

First, the free offering is something likely to get attention, since Pro Tools is usually associated with some cost of entry. The new free version is a really Pro Tools, and can open and save projects – meaning it’ll come in handy if you want to share projects with someone who doesn’t own the software. But it of course has some limitations that would push you back to the paid version.

Once you get pas the obligatory genre project templates (dubstep!), the session software looks like Pro Tools. It’s limited in track and input/output count and is missing more advanced edit features. So, you get:

16 mono or stereo audio tracks
16 Instrument Tracks
16 MIDI tracks
4 simultaneous audio inputs, max
No video
Offline bounce, but limited export/interchange apart from audio bounce
Loop recording, but many of the advanced edit tools are missing, including punch and automation
More restricted instrument/effect suite, though you still get the Xpand!2 instrument and some effects

There’s one other significant restriction, though, that’s perhaps more of a deal-breaker than the others: you can only work with three projects at a time. Avid tell us that you would need to delete a project when you’re no longer working with it. (Presumably moving the project to offline media would also work.)

See the updated comparison chart for how Pro Tools editions differ in functionality.

Apart from the project number restriction, this looks similar to the way Ableton differentiates Live Lite, the software we see more than any other bundled with production gear. The basic idea is, give people the software, but stop them from editing complex projects or using very many tracks. But the project limitation notion is fairly novel, and for me would make me hesitate to recommend the free tool for much more than trying out Pro Tools or sharing a project now and then; there are plenty of cheap DAWs on the market.

More interesting are the other approaches taken with Pro Tools 12. For Pro Tools lovers, this does open up some new ways to buy their software.

Subscriptions and Online Service

Avid has been talking since last year about Avid Everywhere, which is a combination of moving software to subscriptions as well as purchase, and backing it with online services and a marketplace for buying content produced by users in its tools.

Subscribe or buy. Choose subscription or traditional up-front payment. Subscriptions, as with other software, will cost you in the long haul – you can get the price down to US$25, but only if you commit to a year or more. They’re bundled with support, much like the Cakewalk deal mentioned earlier this week.

See more regular updates. Avid also says that the move gets the software off the 18-month revision cycle it had previously used (and, to be fair, what is typical in the rest of the industry as far as major new functionality). Updates will be more frequent, the company says, though we’ve yet to see what that means in practice (especially since pay-to-own versions will remain available). For now, Pro Tools 12 is almost exclusively about providing the new pricing model and compatibility with collaboration, not any significant changes to editing, mixing, or instruments that I can see.

Cloud collaboration. Right now, collaborating in Pro Tools is a matter of manually making ZIP files of projects with collected media and moving them around. Pro Tools 12 promises still-as-yet-unrevealed mechanisms of streamlining this process through updates to the software and accompanying online services.

Expect more of this sort of thing; Propellerhead, for instance, recently announced Discover, for its desktop Reason and iOS apps. But Avid’s offering also assumes that you want to make some money off of that content (or buy it to use it). So, the Avid Everywhere project also includes —

A content marketplace. Here’s where we enter new territory: Avid wants you to share and sell your stuff. Because Avid makes the world’s leading media products, the notion is that you can dump all your assets into a marketplace where other people can choose to buy them – so an editor might pay for your music bed in their sports coverage. Avid handles not only the purchase, but embedding metadata and credits.

It’s not available yet in Pro Tools, and I’m unclear whether those buying such assets want this sort of tool, but we’ll see. Think of it as a combination of SoundCloud and the App Store, only for audio and video.

Buy plug-ins as an add-on. Here’s a part that makes more immediate sense: a built-in marketplace will also let you buy (or rent) instruments and effects directly inside Pro Tools. Subscriptions would be new to Pro Tools developers;

Really, it’s surprising they hadn’t done something like this sooner, given that Pro Tools has always had its own ecosystem of third-party add-ons. (The other tool with the same closed-garden expansion capabilities, Propellerhead Reason, also added in in-app store to go with it.) I imagine this could get heavy use; even Pro Tools First has access to the market.

Making Sense of the New Pro Tools

We’ve known “Avid Everywhere for Audio” was coming as an initiative since last spring. Now, it really remains to see what things look like in practice – whether you love this concept or hate it, what it means in the actual experience of using the software. Sound on Sound have a great video overview from NAMM this week:

At least we can also say Avid the corporate entity is looking far healthier. NASDAQ even had the company ring the opening bell, celebrating its return after being delisted for failing to share critical financial information.

So, will all these new ways to buy Pro Tools software and content, collaboration and marketplace, fuel healthier Pro Tools growth, or be just a distraction? That’s the next chapter.

  • Daniel Courville

    “Avid tell us that you would need to delete a project when you’re no longer working with it. (Presumably moving the project to offline media would also work.)”

    Hum… I would not presume that. And the audio files? Always in transit to and from the cloud? Yeah, everybody has a super fast internet connection…

    • just passing

      Indeed. Isn’t it still recommended practice to keep one’s work computer (DAW or otherwise) disconnected from the internet, whatever one is working on – as much to ensure one actually gets something done as for security reasons?

      In any case, any program that sniffs around my hard drive to find things it can count as “projects” is not, under any circumstances, finding a home therein.

      • Kim

        “Forget having to lug your laptop or USB drive around. Pro Tools | First saves sessions securely in the cloud, enabling you to work on your music practically anywhere.”

        Presumably Pro Tools First will *only* save projects to the cloud. So, you are stuck with no more than three. Guy in the video says maybe in the future you might be able to pay to get more. If these really are the limitations, Pro Tools First is really no more than a demo IMHO. (I suppose you *could* use one project as a kind of long tape and just put several tracks after one another, but…)

        Do remember using the old free version of Pro Tools though, it worked with OS9 on macs. In 2004 or around there. That was alright.

        • Will

          Yep, think you’re right—cloud only = three projects period. Comparison chart says you can buy more project space in the future.

  • Daniel Courville

    “Avid tell us that you would need to delete a project when you’re no longer working with it. (Presumably moving the project to offline media would also work.)”

    Hum… I would not presume that. And the audio files? Always in transit to and from the cloud? Yeah, everybody has a super fast internet connection…

    • just passing

      Indeed. Isn’t it still recommended practice to keep one’s work computer (DAW or otherwise) disconnected from the internet, whatever one is working on – as much to ensure one actually gets something done as for security reasons?

      In any case, any program that sniffs around my hard drive to find things it can count as “projects” is not, under any circumstances, finding a home therein.

      • Kim

        “Forget having to lug your laptop or USB drive around. Pro Tools | First saves sessions securely in the cloud, enabling you to work on your music practically anywhere.”

        Presumably Pro Tools First will *only* save projects to the cloud. So, you are stuck with no more than three. Guy in the video says maybe in the future you might be able to pay to get more. If these really are the limitations, Pro Tools First is really no more than a demo IMHO. (I suppose you *could* use one project as a kind of long tape and just put several tracks after one another, but…)

        Do remember using the old free version of Pro Tools though, it worked with OS9 on macs. In 2004 or around there. That was alright.

        • Will

          Yep, think you’re right—cloud only = three projects period. Comparison chart says you can buy more project space in the future.

  • Daniel Courville

    “Avid tell us that you would need to delete a project when you’re no longer working with it. (Presumably moving the project to offline media would also work.)”

    Hum… I would not presume that. And the audio files? Always in transit to and from the cloud? Yeah, everybody has a super fast internet connection…

    • just passing

      Indeed. Isn’t it still recommended practice to keep one’s work computer (DAW or otherwise) disconnected from the internet, whatever one is working on – as much to ensure one actually gets something done as for security reasons?

      In any case, any program that sniffs around my hard drive to find things it can count as “projects” is not, under any circumstances, finding a home therein.

      • Kim

        “Forget having to lug your laptop or USB drive around. Pro Tools | First saves sessions securely in the cloud, enabling you to work on your music practically anywhere.”

        Presumably Pro Tools First will *only* save projects to the cloud. So, you are stuck with no more than three. Guy in the video says maybe in the future you might be able to pay to get more. If these really are the limitations, Pro Tools First is really no more than a demo IMHO. (I suppose you *could* use one project as a kind of long tape and just put several tracks after one another, but…)

        Do remember using the old free version of Pro Tools though, it worked with OS9 on macs. In 2004 or around there. That was alright.

        • Will

          Yep, think you’re right—cloud only = three projects period. Comparison chart says you can buy more project space in the future.

  • Daniel

    Seriously Peter, where the h*ll is your post on the Prophet 6? That’s what I want to know! >:C

  • Daniel

    Seriously Peter, where the h*ll is your post on the Prophet 6? That’s what I want to know! >:C

  • Daniel

    Seriously Peter, where the h*ll is your post on the Prophet 6? That’s what I want to know! >:C

  • Alex Inglizian

    Is there anything useful in this update? Like for the majority of us that make music with people who are not halfway across the world?

    • I’m just the messenger… 🙂

      No, as near as I can tell, collaboration/marketplace features are all that’s in 12. On the other hand, they’re promising a more regular update cadence, so … maybe they have more in store?

      • Jeff

        Given they are publicly traded, its not legal for Avid to release versions that contain new features without charging for it. (see obscure, but incredibly relevant law here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarbanes–Oxley_Act ) I might be wrong, but I believe their recent trouble with the SEC, getting delisted, etc, is all about a long period where they violated this law, causing them to rework their books to better reflect what they sold and gave away.

        The exception to Sarbanes-Oxley law is if the publicly traded company defers revenue which is easy via subscription model. This allows them to add new functionality after the original sales for some period of time.

        This doesn’t fully explain why this release has no user-facing features, but it might explain why they (and Cakewalk, and Adobe) are switching to this subscription model. In a way, they are just being honest about their core business, which is selling updates to users. With this new model, they can refashion their user-base into a more consistent “everyone is running the latest version” apps universe, and they believe this is really convenient for their software culture.

        • Dopamine Addict

          Thanks Peter.

          • Note that SONAR is not going *rental* – but I believe their plan to offer free updates for 12-months would at least comply with Sarbanes-Oxley … releasing an update to that shortly.

          • Dopamine Addict

            Thanks for clarifying. I had only just read they were offering something like this, but hadn’t looked at the details yet.

  • Alex Inglizian

    Is there anything useful in this update? Like for the majority of us that make music with people who are not halfway across the world?

    • I’m just the messenger… 🙂

      No, as near as I can tell, collaboration/marketplace features are all that’s in 12. On the other hand, they’re promising a more regular update cadence, so … maybe they have more in store?

      • Dopamine Addict

        Given they are publicly traded, its not legal for Avid to release versions that contain new features without charging for it. (see obscure, but incredibly relevant law here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarbanes–Oxley_Act ) I might be wrong, but I believe their recent trouble with the SEC, getting delisted, etc, is all about a long period where they violated this law, causing them to rework their books to better reflect what they sold and gave away.

        The exception to Sarbanes-Oxley law is if the publicly traded company defers revenue which is easy via subscription model. This allows them to add new functionality after the original sales for some period of time.

        This doesn’t fully explain why this release has no user-facing features, but it might explain why they (and Cakewalk, and Adobe) are switching to this subscription model. In a way, they are just being honest about their core business, which is selling updates to users. With this new model, they can refashion their user-base into a more consistent “everyone is running the latest version” apps universe, and they believe this is really convenient for their software culture.

        • Dopamine Addict

          Thanks Peter.

          • Note that SONAR is not going *rental* – but I believe their plan to offer free updates for 12-months would at least comply with Sarbanes-Oxley … releasing an update to that shortly.

          • Dopamine Addict

            Thanks for clarifying. I had only just read they were offering something like this, but hadn’t looked at the details yet.

  • Alex Inglizian

    Is there anything useful in this update? Like for the majority of us that make music with people who are not halfway across the world?

    • I’m just the messenger… 🙂

      No, as near as I can tell, collaboration/marketplace features are all that’s in 12. On the other hand, they’re promising a more regular update cadence, so … maybe they have more in store?

      • Dopamine Addict

        Given they are publicly traded, its not legal for Avid to release versions that contain new features without charging for it. (see obscure, but incredibly relevant law here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarbanes–Oxley_Act ) I might be wrong, but I believe their recent trouble with the SEC, getting delisted, etc, is all about a long period where they violated this law, causing them to rework their books to better reflect what they sold and gave away.

        The exception to Sarbanes-Oxley law is if the publicly traded company defers revenue which is easy via subscription model. This allows them to add new functionality after the original sales for some period of time.

        This doesn’t fully explain why this release has no user-facing features, but it might explain why they (and Cakewalk, and Adobe) are switching to this subscription model. In a way, they are just being honest about their core business, which is selling updates to users. With this new model, they can refashion their user-base into a more consistent “everyone is running the latest version” apps universe, and they believe this is really convenient for their software culture.

        • Dopamine Addict

          Thanks Peter.

          • Note that SONAR is not going *rental* – but I believe their plan to offer free updates for 12-months would at least comply with Sarbanes-Oxley … releasing an update to that shortly.

          • Dopamine Addict

            Thanks for clarifying. I had only just read they were offering something like this, but hadn’t looked at the details yet.

  • heinrichz

    Interesting .. also for education and i can see Apple trying to do something like that with Logic as well and tying it into iTunes and BeatsMusic outlets..and also making it more ‘mobile’ with iOS.

  • heinrichz

    Interesting .. also for education and i can see Apple trying to do something like that with Logic as well and tying it into iTunes and BeatsMusic outlets..and also making it more ‘mobile’ with iOS.

  • heinrichz

    Interesting .. also for education and i can see Apple trying to do something like that with Logic as well and tying it into iTunes and BeatsMusic outlets..and also making it more ‘mobile’ with iOS.

  • Will

    If plugin rentals are cheap enough, the free version+rental is pretty interesting for one off use cases. No doubt, Pro Tools certainly has some pro tools in the plugin arsenal. Maybe you need that stuff for a project. If you can get it in the neighborhood of ~$25 for a month you’re in iOS app pricing territory.

    I don’t want to be the CDM Subscription Mascot but I’m into these companies innovating. The business models haven’t changed in 20 years.

  • Will

    If plugin rentals are cheap enough, the free version+rental is pretty interesting for one off use cases. No doubt, Pro Tools certainly has some pro tools in the plugin arsenal. Maybe you need that stuff for a project. If you can get it in the neighborhood of ~$25 for a month you’re in iOS app pricing territory.

    I don’t want to be the CDM Subscription Mascot but I’m into these companies innovating. The business models haven’t changed in 20 years.

  • Will

    If plugin rentals are cheap enough, the free version+rental is pretty interesting for one off use cases. No doubt, Pro Tools certainly has some pro tools in the plugin arsenal. Maybe you need that stuff for a project. If you can get it in the neighborhood of ~$25 for a month you’re in iOS app pricing territory.

    I don’t want to be the CDM Subscription Mascot but I’m into these companies innovating. The business models haven’t changed in 20 years.

  • dubrobot

    Reaper. A perfect replacement for Avid (Avoid)

  • dubrobot

    Reaper. A perfect replacement for Avid (Avoid)

  • dubrobot

    Reaper. A perfect replacement for Avid (Avoid)

  • pro tools lover

    wow, really exciting how boring this is. they try to tell us that updates are almost twice as expensive (199 subscription/ year) instead of roughly 280 / every two years. this is great, as you´d be paying double for no new features, more often than you used to before. having been a PT user for almost 10 years now I can only say: amazing. as useless as it gets for the user, pretty useful for them. i can only hope avid dies a slow and painful death.

  • pro tools lover

    wow, really exciting how boring this is. they try to tell us that updates are almost twice as expensive (199 subscription/ year) instead of roughly 280 / every two years. this is great, as you´d be paying double for no new features, more often than you used to before. having been a PT user for almost 10 years now I can only say: amazing. as useless as it gets for the user, pretty useful for them. i can only hope avid dies a slow and painful death.

  • pro tools lover

    wow, really exciting how boring this is. they try to tell us that updates are almost twice as expensive (199 subscription/ year) instead of roughly 280 / every two years. this is great, as you´d be paying double for no new features, more often than you used to before. having been a PT user for almost 10 years now I can only say: amazing. as useless as it gets for the user, pretty useful for them. i can only hope avid dies a slow and painful death.

  • Are subscriptions really good?

    Food for thought: At first, this subscription stuff seems like a good thing, but it seems to me that the only people who will gain in the long run from these sandboxed plugin rental marketplaces are the hosts who control the ecosystem itself. The big companies want to unburden themselves from their heavy and long version based development cycles and piggie back off content providers and plugin developers to do so. Customers will become locked into a host platform, their projects will be held hostage by the hosts and in the end the customer will end up spending more than they would have just buying the software they needed to begin with – without even realizing it. The perceived value of plugins and content overtime will drop as customers associate the rental prices with the actual value and developers/content providers will be forced to compete for a piece of the pie that becomes increasingly less likely to obtain in an already crowded marketplace. A handful of “popular” plugins and content will be lucrative and the hosts will rely on new opportunistic developers to provide them with fresh content and the next big winner to feed their machine.

  • Are subscriptions really good?

    Food for thought: At first, this subscription stuff seems like a good thing, but it seems to me that the only people who will gain in the long run from these sandboxed plugin rental marketplaces are the hosts who control the ecosystem itself. The big companies want to unburden themselves from their heavy and long version based development cycles and piggie back off content providers and plugin developers to do so. Customers will become locked into a host platform, their projects will be held hostage by the hosts and in the end the customer will end up spending more than they would have just buying the software they needed to begin with – without even realizing it. The perceived value of plugins and content overtime will drop as customers associate the rental prices with the actual value and developers/content providers will be forced to compete for a piece of the pie that becomes increasingly less likely to obtain in an already crowded marketplace. A handful of “popular” plugins and content will be lucrative and the hosts will rely on new opportunistic developers to provide them with fresh content and the next big winner to feed their machine.

  • Are subscriptions really good?

    Food for thought: At first, this subscription stuff seems like a good thing, but it seems to me that the only people who will gain in the long run from these sandboxed plugin rental marketplaces are the hosts who control the ecosystem itself. The big companies want to unburden themselves from their heavy and long version based development cycles and piggie back off content providers and plugin developers to do so. Customers will become locked into a host platform, their projects will be held hostage by the hosts and in the end the customer will end up spending more than they would have just buying the software they needed to begin with – without even realizing it. The perceived value of plugins and content overtime will drop as customers associate the rental prices with the actual value and developers/content providers will be forced to compete for a piece of the pie that becomes increasingly less likely to obtain in an already crowded marketplace. A handful of “popular” plugins and content will be lucrative and the hosts will rely on new opportunistic developers to provide them with fresh content and the next big winner to feed their machine.

  • bleehd

    Should You Upgrade to AVID’s New Version of Pro Tools 12? What are the costs and consequences?

    Check out the answers a rep gave me at the NAMM show to help you see all the potential issues you could encounter if you upgrade.

    http://bit.ly/1JSuUOW

    • Matthew Mitschang

      Too bad you got it very wrong. Your article claims that licenses are revoked after a year. Licenses are perpetual. And when I pointed this out, you banned me. Your article only serves to confuse people more, because it contains outright falsehoods.

      • bleehd

        Perhaps your delivery did not foster an openness to your opinion. Next time try having a good, kind and graceful discussion where we try to seek answers instead of calling someone a liar about talking to an avid rep and making character attacks.

        Just because you may know something doesn’t mean someone else is trying to falsely present something. I will investigate, but I reported accurately what I was told. That is not my fault.

        • Matthew Mitschang

          I pointed you to the correct information and told you to do your due diligence. It absolutely is your fault if you post inaccurate information while claiming to have an inside track on the new licensing model. You were not telling the truth about what an Avid rep told you.

          • bleehd

            Its a personal blog, not some huge news team. Give me a break.

            That’s also pretty revealing of the attitude you put on my site to assume I won’t update it. I plan to, but you wouldn’t give people a benefit of a doubt. I’m at peace about it, but you seem to be rather upset about it and having that stress seems like a bummer.

            You assume and accuse of much. I never acted like I had an inside track. Anyone could have talked to a rep at namm. Stop calling me a liar. Perhaps the rep was wrong? Get off your soapbox. Honestly, no one else is hearing your shouts.

          • Matthew Mitschang

            A personal blog that you’re advertising here, on Pro Tools Expert, on KVR, Reddit, and who knows where else – that’s just the result of a single google search. You’re attempting to advise people, and your information is incorrect. It’s not hard to get it right.

  • bleehd

    Should You Upgrade to AVID’s New Version of Pro Tools 12? What are the costs and consequences?

    Check out the answers a rep gave me at the NAMM show to help you see all the potential issues you could encounter if you upgrade.

    http://bit.ly/1JSuUOW

    • user0614

      Too bad you got it very wrong. Your article claims that licenses are revoked after a year. Licenses are perpetual. And when I pointed this out, you banned me. Your article only serves to confuse people more, because it contains outright falsehoods.

      • bleehd

        Perhaps your delivery did not foster an openness to your opinion. Next time try having a good, kind and graceful discussion where we try to seek answers instead of calling someone a liar about talking to an avid rep and making character attacks.

        Just because you may know something doesn’t mean someone else is trying to falsely present something. I will investigate, but I reported accurately what I was told. That is not my fault.

        • user0614

          I pointed you to the correct information and told you to do your due diligence. It absolutely is your fault if you post inaccurate information while claiming to have an inside track on the new licensing model. You were not telling the truth about what an Avid rep told you.

          • bleehd

            Its a personal blog, not some huge news team. Give me a break.

            That’s also pretty revealing of the attitude you put on my site to assume I won’t update it. I plan to, but you wouldn’t give people a benefit of a doubt. I’m at peace about it, but you seem to be rather upset about it and having that stress seems like a bummer.

            You assume and accuse of much. I never acted like I had an inside track. Anyone could have talked to a rep at namm. Stop calling me a liar. Perhaps the rep was wrong? Get off your soapbox. Honestly, no one else is hearing your shouts.

          • user0614

            A personal blog that you’re advertising here, on Pro Tools Expert, on KVR, Reddit, and who knows where else – that’s just the result of a single google search. You’re attempting to advise people, and your information is incorrect. It’s not hard to get it right.

  • bleehd

    Should You Upgrade to AVID’s New Version of Pro Tools 12? What are the costs and consequences?

    Check out the answers a rep gave me at the NAMM show to help you see all the potential issues you could encounter if you upgrade.

    http://bit.ly/1JSuUOW

    • user0614

      Too bad you got it very wrong. Your article claims that licenses are revoked after a year. Licenses are perpetual. And when I pointed this out, you banned me. Your article only serves to confuse people more, because it contains outright falsehoods.

      • bleehd

        Perhaps your delivery did not foster an openness to your opinion. Next time try having a good, kind and graceful discussion where we try to seek answers instead of calling someone a liar about talking to an avid rep and making character attacks.

        Just because you may know something doesn’t mean someone else is trying to falsely present something. I will investigate, but I reported accurately what I was told. That is not my fault.

        • user0614

          I pointed you to the correct information and told you to do your due diligence. It absolutely is your fault if you post inaccurate information while claiming to have an inside track on the new licensing model. You were not telling the truth about what an Avid rep told you.

          • bleehd

            Its a personal blog, not some huge news team. Give me a break.

            That’s also pretty revealing of the attitude you put on my site to assume I won’t update it. I plan to, but you wouldn’t give people a benefit of a doubt. I’m at peace about it, but you seem to be rather upset about it and having that stress seems like a bummer.

            You assume and accuse of much. I never acted like I had an inside track. Anyone could have talked to a rep at namm. Stop calling me a liar. Perhaps the rep was wrong? Get off your soapbox. Honestly, no one else is hearing your shouts.

          • user0614

            A personal blog that you’re advertising here, on Pro Tools Expert, on KVR, Reddit, and who knows where else – that’s just the result of a single google search. You’re attempting to advise people, and your information is incorrect. It’s not hard to get it right.

  • terrygrant

    I believe it’s been confirmed that 12 will have track freeze features as well… which is good, as we users have been asking for it for like, 6 or 7 years now.

  • terrygrant

    I believe it’s been confirmed that 12 will have track freeze features as well… which is good, as we users have been asking for it for like, 6 or 7 years now.

  • terrygrant

    I believe it’s been confirmed that 12 will have track freeze features as well… which is good, as we users have been asking for it for like, 6 or 7 years now.