abletonbook

Imagine if the Eno/Schmidt Oblique Strategies, a music theory book, and an Ableton quick-start manual all got caught in a transporter accident with a bunch of different music producers.*

That seems to be what you get with Making Music: A Book of Creative Strategies. In one sense, the aim is to be none of these things. It’s not a manual. It’s not a template for music making. It doesn’t, apparently, rely much on musical theory in the traditional sense.

But, then, if you know the man behind it – Dennis DeSantis, a classical percussion virtuoso and composer turned documentation czar – this all makes sense.

The book is divided into the three places where you might become stuck creatively:

1. Beginning
2. Progressing
3. Finishing

And in each section, it includes both problems and solutions, plus hands-on reflections from artists, ranging from experimental to club. (I wish it had sections for “soups” and “desserts,” but this isn’t my book.) Sometimes, it’s talking about specific harmonies in house music. Sometimes, it’s reflecting on the very act of listening.

parallel-harmony-2

In fact, if anything, the whole thing seems a bit like Fux’s Gradus ad Parnassum rewritten, Julia Child The Joy of Cooking style, for anyone frustrated with a blank or overcrowded Ableton Live session display.

But I’m delighted to see it. I can’t imagine myself trying to organize a book in this particular way – we’ll talk to Dennis shortly about how he went about it and offer an excerpt for you to read, if you’re curious. But it seems a marvelous challenge. And it represents the sort of discourse I hope we have more of – one that lies at the intersection of philosophy and creativity and the specific particularities both of musical craft and technological praxis.

pages

makingmusic

A composer in the 18th century had to tackle, simultaneously, the deep meaning of poetry and whether that clarinet player could really easily finger that melody they just wrote. So it shouldn’t seem a conflict of interests when we have to wrangle with a particular detail of automating a plug-in and the grand sweep of the form of the track we’re finishing. The clash between the specific and the profound, and the desperate struggle to actually make something we like, is at the essence of creative process.

If you have specific things you’d like us to ask Dennis about this question, or documentation of music software in general, or cool things he knows about new music on the marimba, let us know.

More info, excerpts:
https://makingmusic.ableton.com/

Note to wise people: has any music software company really done anything like this? I don’t think so. For that matter, I can only think of a handful of books that attempted this sort of scope (though a smattering of this way of thinking has been added in over the years). One advantage of Ableton as patron: you don’t have to convince a publisher this would work.

Obligatory nerd-out: *Okay, think of this as the reverse of the transport accident in Season 1, Episode 5 “The Enemy Within.” In this version, all those parts form some new composite that comes out neatly as a … book. Which is cool. Also, Space Dog. I may be a hopeless nerd, but the advantage of hopeless nerds is we always know where to find weird furry unicorn dogs for you.

  • chaircrusher

    If you’ve read the Ableton Manual, you’ve read Dennis’ writing, and his overall editorial eye. It’s good stuff. The initial on-line chapters aren’t earth-shattering new information; think of this book as being clear meditations on the things we all think about when we’re making music in a foggier, less organized manner.

    The feeling I get from the early chapter links it — in tone and general subject matter with David Byrne’s “How Music Works” which is another brilliant meta-musical volume. http://amzn.to/1I0hGjR

  • chaircrusher

    If you’ve read the Ableton Manual, you’ve read Dennis’ writing, and his overall editorial eye. It’s good stuff. The initial on-line chapters aren’t earth-shattering new information; think of this book as being clear meditations on the things we all think about when we’re making music in a foggier, less organized manner.

    The feeling I get from the early chapter links it — in tone and general subject matter with David Byrne’s “How Music Works” which is another brilliant meta-musical volume. http://amzn.to/1I0hGjR

  • chaircrusher

    If you’ve read the Ableton Manual, you’ve read Dennis’ writing, and his overall editorial eye. It’s good stuff. The initial on-line chapters aren’t earth-shattering new information; think of this book as being clear meditations on the things we all think about when we’re making music in a foggier, less organized manner.

    The feeling I get from the early chapter links it — in tone and general subject matter with David Byrne’s “How Music Works” which is another brilliant meta-musical volume. http://amzn.to/1I0hGjR

  • fierywater

    This looks like it could really be something special.

    Given that I don’t use Live, I’m happy to see that it doesn’t appear to be overly Live-centric. It uses Live for DAW screenshots but the DAW references themselves are generic (at least in the sample chapters).

  • fierywater

    This looks like it could really be something special.

    Given that I don’t use Live, I’m happy to see that it doesn’t appear to be overly Live-centric. It uses Live for DAW screenshots but the DAW references themselves are generic (at least in the sample chapters).

  • fierywater

    This looks like it could really be something special.

    Given that I don’t use Live, I’m happy to see that it doesn’t appear to be overly Live-centric. It uses Live for DAW screenshots but the DAW references themselves are generic (at least in the sample chapters).

  • itchy

    more focus on the software please. less distraction.

    • Michael Aldridge

      There are many online and printed tutorials and manuals specifically for Ableton, and from reading a couple of the sample chapters, there is some reference to Ableton for the implementation of the ideas and theories. Personally I view this book as a set of useful exercises that can be applied to producing (electronic) music generally – the fact that Ableton are involved with the publishing of this book seems somewhat incidental (though very beneficial to them obviously!)

    • danpprince

      Be careful not to miss why this manual is special. Learning how to use all the functionality of Ableton Live will probably take you a few years at most. However, musical problems like how to write a good melody and create a captivating arrangement have existed for hundreds of years and are mostly unsolved. It’s easy to lose sight of this when writing electronic music with the incredibly interesting, yet distracting fields of sound design, mixing, mastering, technology, and everything else that comes with the territory. Learning how to use the software is like memorizing how to play a scale, while learning to compose a song with these tools is where the meaningful and challenging parts are.

      • itchy

        i mean i am not knocking it. to each is own. and im sure there are many things i can relate too in the book, . but figuring out those things on my own is part of my journey. not something a manual cannot fix for me . i might even buy it just to prove myself wrong or right. dennis is a very knowledgable dude and has showed me a thing or too. so i give him props.

        • itchy

          *can fix for me.

    • foljs

      Err, the software is the distraction.

      The goal is the creative output — not fiddling with software menues…

      • itchy

        ableton doesn’t have many menus, hence a reason why i like it. its a fad now to hate the computer. i get being on just the computer all the time is no good. but let us not forget how awesome the computer is as well.

    • Aaron Zilch

      Trust me, there is plenty of focus on the software. Live 9.3 is coming and as always Ableton have focused on the kind of technical improvements that really matter. Latency has been vastly improved in many areas, including the infamous delay compensation automation issue. You even get a specific readout of the latency created by any particular plug in. The complex and complex pro algorithms have been updated to élastique Pro V3 for improved transient handling. And we get further improvements to Push including a 64 Pad Drum Rack mode.

  • itchy

    more focus on the software please. less distraction.

    • Michael Aldridge

      There are many online and printed tutorials and manuals specifically for Ableton, and from reading a couple of the sample chapters, there is some reference to Ableton for the implementation of the ideas and theories. Personally I view this book as a set of useful exercises that can be applied to producing (electronic) music generally – the fact that Ableton are involved with the publishing of this book seems somewhat incidental (though very beneficial to them obviously!)

    • danpprince

      Be careful not to miss why this manual is special. Learning how to use all the functionality of Ableton Live will probably take you a few years at most. However, musical problems like how to write a good melody and create a captivating arrangement have existed for hundreds of years and are mostly unsolved. It’s easy to lose sight of this when writing electronic music with the incredibly interesting, yet distracting fields of sound design, mixing, mastering, technology, and everything else that comes with the territory. Learning how to use the software is like memorizing how to play a scale, while learning to compose a song with these tools is where the meaningful and challenging parts are.

      • itchy

        i mean i am not knocking it. to each is own. and im sure there are many things i can relate too in the book, . but figuring out those things on my own is part of my journey. not something a manual cannot fix for me . i might even buy it just to prove myself wrong or right. dennis is a very knowledgable dude and has showed me a thing or too. so i give him props.

        • itchy

          *can fix for me.

    • foljs

      Err, the software is the distraction.

      The goal is the creative output — not fiddling with software menues…

      • itchy

        ableton doesn’t have many menus, hence a reason why i like it. its a fad now to hate the computer. i get being on just the computer all the time is no good. but let us not forget how awesome the computer is as well.

    • Aaron Zilch

      Trust me, there is plenty of focus on the software. Live 9.3 is coming and as always Ableton have focused on the kind of technical improvements that really matter. Latency has been vastly improved in many areas, including the infamous delay compensation automation issue. You even get a specific readout of the latency created by any particular plug in. The complex and complex pro algorithms have been updated to élastique Pro V3 for improved transient handling. And we get further improvements to Push including a 64 Pad Drum Rack mode.

  • itchy

    more focus on the software please. less distraction.

    • Michael Aldridge

      There are many online and printed tutorials and manuals specifically for Ableton, and from reading a couple of the sample chapters, there is some reference to Ableton for the implementation of the ideas and theories. Personally I view this book as a set of useful exercises that can be applied to producing (electronic) music generally – the fact that Ableton are involved with the publishing of this book seems somewhat incidental (though very beneficial to them obviously!)

    • danpprince

      Be careful not to miss why this manual is special. Learning how to use all the functionality of Ableton Live will probably take you a few years at most. However, musical problems like how to write a good melody and create a captivating arrangement have existed for hundreds of years and are mostly unsolved. It’s easy to lose sight of this when writing electronic music with the incredibly interesting, yet distracting fields of sound design, mixing, mastering, technology, and everything else that comes with the territory. Learning how to use the software is like memorizing how to play a scale, while learning to compose a song with these tools is where the meaningful and challenging parts are.

      • itchy

        i mean i am not knocking it. to each is own. and im sure there are many things i can relate too in the book, . but figuring out those things on my own is part of my journey. not something a manual cannot fix for me . i might even buy it just to prove myself wrong or right. dennis is a very knowledgable dude and has showed me a thing or too. so i give him props.

        • itchy

          *can fix for me.

    • foljs

      Err, the software is the distraction.

      The goal is the creative output — not fiddling with software menues…

      • itchy

        ableton doesn’t have many menus, hence a reason why i like it. its a fad now to hate the computer. i get being on just the computer all the time is no good. but let us not forget how awesome the computer is as well.

    • Aaron Zilch

      Trust me, there is plenty of focus on the software. Live 9.3 is coming and as always Ableton have focused on the kind of technical improvements that really matter. Latency has been vastly improved in many areas, including the infamous delay compensation automation issue. You even get a specific readout of the latency created by any particular plug in. The complex and complex pro algorithms have been updated to élastique Pro V3 for improved transient handling. And we get further improvements to Push including a 64 Pad Drum Rack mode.

  • jjbbllkk

    Gonna stick with my Oblique Strategies. Also, why 74? Is that some weird Max/MSP reference?

    • Michael Aldridge

      Ha, I must admit that Cycling 74 went through my mind first, perhaps it was a nod in that direction

  • jblk

    Gonna stick with my Oblique Strategies. Also, why 74? Is that some weird Max/MSP reference?

    • Michael Aldridge

      Ha, I must admit that Cycling 74 went through my mind first, perhaps it was a nod in that direction

  • jblk

    Gonna stick with my Oblique Strategies. Also, why 74? Is that some weird Max/MSP reference?

    • Michael Aldridge

      Ha, I must admit that Cycling 74 went through my mind first, perhaps it was a nod in that direction

  • Michael Aldridge

    I ordered this book this afternoon and can’t wait to read through it. From skimming the sample chapters it seems to address a few things I struggle with – procrastination being one – which may be ironic as getting this book could indeed be a form of that procrastination. Hey ho, we’ll see 🙂

    • Fayek Helmi

      it’s funny, in the procrastination chapter… he was talking about different ways people procrastinate, and i was almost positively sure he was going to say “reading this book” as an excample hahaha it would’ve been pretty witty.

  • Michael Aldridge

    I ordered this book this afternoon and can’t wait to read through it. From skimming the sample chapters it seems to address a few things I struggle with – procrastination being one – which may be ironic as getting this book could indeed be a form of that procrastination. Hey ho, we’ll see 🙂

    • Fayek Helmi

      it’s funny, in the procrastination chapter… he was talking about different ways people procrastinate, and i was almost positively sure he was going to say “reading this book” as an excample hahaha it would’ve been pretty witty.

  • Michael Aldridge

    I ordered this book this afternoon and can’t wait to read through it. From skimming the sample chapters it seems to address a few things I struggle with – procrastination being one – which may be ironic as getting this book could indeed be a form of that procrastination. Hey ho, we’ll see 🙂

    • Fayek Helmi

      it’s funny, in the procrastination chapter… he was talking about different ways people procrastinate, and i was almost positively sure he was going to say “reading this book” as an excample hahaha it would’ve been pretty witty.

  • TJ

    This is very cool of Ableton and greatly needed. It’s often easy to get lost in the weeds with the technology today.

  • TJ

    This is very cool of Ableton and greatly needed. It’s often easy to get lost in the weeds with the technology today.

  • TJ

    This is very cool of Ableton and greatly needed. It’s often easy to get lost in the weeds with the technology today.

  • Daniel Prince

    From the About page of this book:

    “For many artists, nothing inspires more existential terror than actually making art. The fear that we’re not good enough or that we don’t know enough results in untold numbers of creative crises and potential masterpieces that never get realized.

    Electronic musicians used to be able to hide behind clunky, emerging technology as an excuse for inaction. But musicians today live in a golden age of tools and technology. A ninety-nine-cent smartphone app can give you the functionality of a million-dollar recording studio. A new song can be shared with the world as soon as it’s finished. Tutorials for every sound design or music production technique can be found through a Google search. All of these developments have served to level the playing field for musicians, making it possible for a bedroom producer to create music at a level that used to be possible only for major-label artists.


    But despite all of this, making music is still hard. Why?

    Making Music was written both to answer this question and to offer ways to make it easier. It presents a systematic, concrete set of patterns that you can use when making music in order to move forward.”

    That’s brilliant. The electronic music world hasn’t yet realized this existential crisis of a world where everyone has the same tools and you are not special if you know how to program a synthesizer or tweak a compressor. Everyone can get these tools and learn to use them, so the technical knowledge within itself is no longer an artistic differentiation. It’s time that we come to grips with this so that we can realize that we have the same problem as classical composers and acoustic musicians. We’re all just trying to write good songs.

    • Miguel Ângelo

      I think everyone has their own style. certain styles get caught on, some aren’t. not everyone needs to make a generic electronic music, you can always do something else. you’re just using a computer.

  • Daniel Prince

    From the About page of this book:

    “For many artists, nothing inspires more existential terror than actually making art. The fear that we’re not good enough or that we don’t know enough results in untold numbers of creative crises and potential masterpieces that never get realized.

    Electronic musicians used to be able to hide behind clunky, emerging technology as an excuse for inaction. But musicians today live in a golden age of tools and technology. A ninety-nine-cent smartphone app can give you the functionality of a million-dollar recording studio. A new song can be shared with the world as soon as it’s finished. Tutorials for every sound design or music production technique can be found through a Google search. All of these developments have served to level the playing field for musicians, making it possible for a bedroom producer to create music at a level that used to be possible only for major-label artists.


    But despite all of this, making music is still hard. Why?

    Making Music was written both to answer this question and to offer ways to make it easier. It presents a systematic, concrete set of patterns that you can use when making music in order to move forward.”

    That’s brilliant. The electronic music world hasn’t yet realized this existential crisis of a world where everyone has the same tools and you are not special if you know how to program a synthesizer or tweak a compressor. Everyone can get these tools and learn to use them, so the technical knowledge within itself is no longer an artistic differentiation. It’s time that we come to grips with this so that we can realize that we have the same problem as classical composers and acoustic musicians. We’re all just trying to write good songs.

    • Miguel Ângelo

      I think everyone has their own style. certain styles get caught on, some aren’t. not everyone needs to make a generic electronic music, you can always do something else. you’re just using a computer.

  • Daniel Prince

    From the About page of this book:

    “For many artists, nothing inspires more existential terror than actually making art. The fear that we’re not good enough or that we don’t know enough results in untold numbers of creative crises and potential masterpieces that never get realized.

    Electronic musicians used to be able to hide behind clunky, emerging technology as an excuse for inaction. But musicians today live in a golden age of tools and technology. A ninety-nine-cent smartphone app can give you the functionality of a million-dollar recording studio. A new song can be shared with the world as soon as it’s finished. Tutorials for every sound design or music production technique can be found through a Google search. All of these developments have served to level the playing field for musicians, making it possible for a bedroom producer to create music at a level that used to be possible only for major-label artists.


    But despite all of this, making music is still hard. Why?

    Making Music was written both to answer this question and to offer ways to make it easier. It presents a systematic, concrete set of patterns that you can use when making music in order to move forward.”

    That’s brilliant. The electronic music world hasn’t yet realized this existential crisis of a world where everyone has the same tools and you are not special if you know how to program a synthesizer or tweak a compressor. Everyone can get these tools and learn to use them, so the technical knowledge within itself is no longer an artistic differentiation. It’s time that we come to grips with this so that we can realize that we have the same problem as classical composers and acoustic musicians. We’re all just trying to write good songs.

    • Miguel Ângelo

      I think everyone has their own style. certain styles get caught on, some aren’t. not everyone needs to make a generic electronic music, you can always do something else. you’re just using a computer.

  • lala

    do they only sell it on dead trees?

    • Freeks

      “Coming to Amazon Kindle Store and Apple iBooks soon.”

      I was surprised that it is a REAL book. 25€ for pdf would have been a bit too much.

  • lala

    do they only sell it on dead trees?

    • Freeks

      “Coming to Amazon Kindle Store and Apple iBooks soon.”

      I was surprised that it is a REAL book. 25€ for pdf would have been a bit too much.

  • lala

    do they only sell it on dead trees?

    • Freeks

      “Coming to Amazon Kindle Store and Apple iBooks soon.”

      I was surprised that it is a REAL book. 25€ for pdf would have been a bit too much.

  • I like the styling of it too. and the website looks clean and useful too. smart thinking.

  • I like the styling of it too. and the website looks clean and useful too. smart thinking.

  • I like the styling of it too. and the website looks clean and useful too. smart thinking.

  • gunboat_d

    I imagine this could help people no matter which DAW you use.
    [click]
    IN THE MAIL

  • gunboat_d

    I imagine this could help people no matter which DAW you use.
    [click]
    IN THE MAIL

  • gunboat_d

    I imagine this could help people no matter which DAW you use.
    [click]
    IN THE MAIL

  • Just read the Some of the Chapters on the Ableton Site WOW Pretty Impressive- I like that way thinks about amateurs, (those of us who play what they like without care for commercial gain). As well as some of the approaches he takes to tackle a problem. Worst part about the book is that it is sold out.

  • Just read the Some of the Chapters on the Ableton Site WOW Pretty Impressive- I like that way thinks about amateurs, (those of us who play what they like without care for commercial gain). As well as some of the approaches he takes to tackle a problem. Worst part about the book is that it is sold out.

  • Just read the Some of the Chapters on the Ableton Site WOW Pretty Impressive- I like that way thinks about amateurs, (those of us who play what they like without care for commercial gain). As well as some of the approaches he takes to tackle a problem. Worst part about the book is that it is sold out.

  • doctec

    Thanks for the book review, I’d buy it now if it weren’t sold out and I’m between paychecks. Indeed it does sound like a transporter accident – a very welcome one in this case. (A **very** niggling detail which I’m almost hesitant to bring up because I understand the analogy you’re trying to make, but … Julia Child did not write The Joy Of Cooking – she wrote Mastering The Art of French Cooking. The Joy Of Cooking was written by Irma S. Rombauer in 1931 with periodic revisions after her death in 1962 carried out by her children. From your description of DeSantis’ book, it sounds closer in style to Rombauer than Child.)

  • doctec

    Thanks for the book review, I’d buy it now if it weren’t sold out and I’m between paychecks. Indeed it does sound like a transporter accident – a very welcome one in this case. (A **very** niggling detail which I’m almost hesitant to bring up because I understand the analogy you’re trying to make, but … Julia Child did not write The Joy Of Cooking – she wrote Mastering The Art of French Cooking. The Joy Of Cooking was written by Irma S. Rombauer in 1931 with periodic revisions after her death in 1962 carried out by her children. From your description of DeSantis’ book, it sounds closer in style to Rombauer than Child.)

  • doctec

    Thanks for the book review, I’d buy it now if it weren’t sold out and I’m between paychecks. Indeed it does sound like a transporter accident – a very welcome one in this case. (A **very** niggling detail which I’m almost hesitant to bring up because I understand the analogy you’re trying to make, but … Julia Child did not write The Joy Of Cooking – she wrote Mastering The Art of French Cooking. The Joy Of Cooking was written by Irma S. Rombauer in 1931 with periodic revisions after her death in 1962 carried out by her children. From your description of DeSantis’ book, it sounds closer in style to Rombauer than Child.)

  • Fayek Helmi

    boook already sold out hahaha! i can’t wait for the digital version!! read the little introductory parts on the site such a good read!

  • Fayek Helmi

    boook already sold out hahaha! i can’t wait for the digital version!! read the little introductory parts on the site such a good read!

  • Fayek Helmi

    boook already sold out hahaha! i can’t wait for the digital version!! read the little introductory parts on the site such a good read!

  • Fayek Helmi

    If i can’t truly switch my mentality to a “no pressure” amateur point of view i will be a happy camper making a lot more music than i am currently now…. same thing used to happen with skateboarding back in the day kid that did it for fun were geting a lot better than the kids that wanted to be “pros”… and it showed… it’s hard but we can’t ever forget WHY we do what we do… afterall it’s for the love of making music…..

    • Great comment! Would love to be able to describe Auxy as the skateboarding of music making. 🙂

      • Fayek Helmi

        i have personally found my “no presure back to fun” app for music creation. caustic.

        A mobile app with incredible control with a somewhat retro feel (as if it’s a hybrid of ableton, fl studio and famitracker)

        I love the pattern banks style of composing, just write a bunch of diff patterns (up to 64) for each instrument and then in song arrangement mode pick which pattern to input where…

        I’m desparately waiting for the digital version to come out for this book.i’m finding myself having an incredibly hard to start new stuff now because if the limited time i have to produce music i think i put way too much pressure on myself that everything i write is a gem otherwise i must not waste my time with it. which is an incredibly BAD mental state….

        • Thanks, will try Caustic.

          Curious to hear if you’ve tried Auxy for iPad and what you think of it?

  • Fayek Helmi

    If i can’t truly switch my mentality to a “no pressure” amateur point of view i will be a happy camper making a lot more music than i am currently now…. same thing used to happen with skateboarding back in the day kid that did it for fun were geting a lot better than the kids that wanted to be “pros”… and it showed… it’s hard but we can’t ever forget WHY we do what we do… afterall it’s for the love of making music…..

    • Great comment! Would love to be able to describe Auxy as the skateboarding of music making. 🙂

      • Fayek Helmi

        i have personally found my “no presure back to fun” app for music creation. caustic.

        A mobile app with incredible control with a somewhat retro feel (as if it’s a hybrid of ableton, fl studio and famitracker)

        I love the pattern banks style of composing, just write a bunch of diff patterns (up to 64) for each instrument and then in song arrangement mode pick which pattern to input where…

        I’m desparately waiting for the digital version to come out for this book.i’m finding myself having an incredibly hard to start new stuff now because if the limited time i have to produce music i think i put way too much pressure on myself that everything i write is a gem otherwise i must not waste my time with it. which is an incredibly BAD mental state….

        • Thanks, will try Caustic.

          Curious to hear if you’ve tried Auxy for iPad and what you think of it?

  • Fayek Helmi

    If i can’t truly switch my mentality to a “no pressure” amateur point of view i will be a happy camper making a lot more music than i am currently now…. same thing used to happen with skateboarding back in the day kid that did it for fun were geting a lot better than the kids that wanted to be “pros”… and it showed… it’s hard but we can’t ever forget WHY we do what we do… afterall it’s for the love of making music…..

    • Great comment! Would love to be able to describe Auxy as the skateboarding of music making. 🙂

      • Fayek Helmi

        i have personally found my “no presure back to fun” app for music creation. caustic.

        A mobile app with incredible control with a somewhat retro feel (as if it’s a hybrid of ableton, fl studio and famitracker)

        I love the pattern banks style of composing, just write a bunch of diff patterns (up to 64) for each instrument and then in song arrangement mode pick which pattern to input where…

        I’m desparately waiting for the digital version to come out for this book.i’m finding myself having an incredibly hard to start new stuff now because if the limited time i have to produce music i think i put way too much pressure on myself that everything i write is a gem otherwise i must not waste my time with it. which is an incredibly BAD mental state….

        • Thanks, will try Caustic.

          Curious to hear if you’ve tried Auxy for iPad and what you think of it?

  • Robin Parmar

    This seems an excellent book for beginners, something that is sorely needed. My own interest in Ableton Live is zero, but at least I have something to recommend to my students.

  • Robin Parmar

    This seems an excellent book for beginners, something that is sorely needed. My own interest in Ableton Live is zero, but at least I have something to recommend to my students.

  • This seems an excellent book for beginners, something that is sorely needed. My own interest in Ableton Live is zero, but at least I have something to recommend to my students.

  • Freeks

    Vapour book 🙁

    I ordered and paid when released, but they never sent it.

    Have anyone else got the book?

    • Michael Aldridge

      I ordered mine last Wednesday, 18th March. It arrived by UPS on Monday, 23rd March. I had emails from Ableton and UPS with tracking codes etc. I personally cannot fault the service.

  • Freeks

    Vapour book 🙁

    I ordered and paid when released, but they never sent it.

    Have anyone else got the book?

    • Michael Aldridge

      I ordered mine last Wednesday, 18th March. It arrived by UPS on Monday, 23rd March. I had emails from Ableton and UPS with tracking codes etc. I personally cannot fault the service.

  • Freeks

    Vapour book 🙁

    I ordered and paid when released, but they never sent it.

    Have anyone else got the book?

    • Michael Aldridge

      I ordered mine last Wednesday, 18th March. It arrived by UPS on Monday, 23rd March. I had emails from Ableton and UPS with tracking codes etc. I personally cannot fault the service.

  • rob

    this book is just.. WOW!! got my copy yesterday. finally someone really gets to the core of ..music, not music-technology. i found out a lot of the ideas on “making music” by myself the last years with pure work, but there is so much more to discover, and this helps so much finding the path. totally recommend it to everyone! also love it that they made a book, not some e-paper-pdf-whatever. this 25 bucks are well invested! cheers.

  • rob

    this book is just.. WOW!! got my copy yesterday. finally someone really gets to the core of ..music, not music-technology. i found out a lot of the ideas on “making music” by myself the last years with pure work, but there is so much more to discover, and this helps so much finding the path. totally recommend it to everyone! also love it that they made a book, not some e-paper-pdf-whatever. this 25 bucks are well invested! cheers.

  • rob

    this book is just.. WOW!! got my copy yesterday. finally someone really gets to the core of ..music, not music-technology. i found out a lot of the ideas on “making music” by myself the last years with pure work, but there is so much more to discover, and this helps so much finding the path. totally recommend it to everyone! also love it that they made a book, not some e-paper-pdf-whatever. this 25 bucks are well invested! cheers.

  • Guillermo

    “But I’m delighted to see it. I can’t imagine myself trying to organize a book in this particular way”

    It’s usual in some books on software development:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_design_pattern

    • Design patterns, yes. But it’s an ambitious project for music, for this audience.

  • Guillermo

    “But I’m delighted to see it. I can’t imagine myself trying to organize a book in this particular way”

    It’s usual in some books on software development:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_design_pattern

    • Design patterns, yes. But it’s an ambitious project for music, for this audience.

  • Guillermo

    “But I’m delighted to see it. I can’t imagine myself trying to organize a book in this particular way”

    It’s usual in some books on software development:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_design_pattern

    • Design patterns, yes. But it’s an ambitious project for music, for this audience.

  • InfoWarfare

    FYI: For those thinking they were sold out… I just received an email from Ableton saying they found a few more First Edition copies of this book and are now selling it before the second printing begins. Ordered!

  • InfoWarfare

    FYI: For those thinking they were sold out… I just received an email from Ableton saying they found a few more First Edition copies of this book and are now selling it before the second printing begins. Ordered!

  • InfoWarfare

    FYI: For those thinking they were sold out… I just received an email from Ableton saying they found a few more First Edition copies of this book and are now selling it before the second printing begins. Ordered!