noports

Yes, Apple is today talking about wristwatches. But judging by those glowing logos I see absolutely everywhere all the time, it’s probably MacBooks that matter to you music creating folk.

Apple today has three items of computer news:
1. They’re introducing a new, 12″ display model called the “all-new MacBook” (note that exact wording).
2. They’re updating the 13-inch Macbook Pro with Retina Display.
3. They’re updating the MacBook Air.
(There are no changes to the 15″ model, but these revisions have historically been staggered.)

With Apple, nomenclature is everything. It’s been a while since Apple called anything “MacBook” without appending either the word “Air” or the word “Pro” to the end.

So, here’s what you need to know about the “all-new MacBook”: you don’t want it. Seriously, if you’re reading this right now, you’re not going to like it.

Just don’t panic yet. What you need to know about the Air and in particular the Pro is that nothing substantial changes, and that’s a good thing. So you won’t want the “all-new MacBook” – but Apple probably knows you won’t want it, and continues to take your money for the ones you do want.

macbookallnew

The all-new MacBook will probably be a good machine for a lot of Apple’s customers. It’s thinner and lighter and more compact for people who just want an ultra-mobile machine. But there are tradeoffs for us that won’t make sense: the display is going to be all-but-impossible to see for music production work, the processor is underpowered (it’s a mobile variant of the Core chips in the bigger machines), and now it really has no ports. There’s a single USB-C connector, and nothing else. USB-C is the so-new-nothing-supports-it future of USB, the physical gateway to a faster variant of the USB bus itself.

Someday, both USB-C and the bus underneath may be relevant to music making. And I expect we will eventually see it on the MacBook Pro. But the fact that Apple didn’t put it there today suggests even they know that you don’t want it. No hardware supports it, many adapters that make it backwards-compatible aren’t even out yet, and you want more than one port for everything if you’re doing serious production work.

In fact, in a comparison many, many people will make in coming days, the port situation on the ultra-compact 12″ model is very similar to the iPad.

Update: You will be able to use multiple ports at once. A pricey multi-adapter will support power, HDMI, and USB, for instance. And you can break out USB to a hub. But notice what’s missing: Thunderbolt. I fully expect “Pro” models from Apple will continue to feature multiple ports, and this minimalism – and the pain that comes with it – will be limited to the ultra-compact consumer-targeted models. USB-C and adapters are inevitable someday on the Pro models, but they will almost certainly not be limited to just one port.

The reason you shouldn’t immediately panic about the future of the Mac is that Apple was already differentiating the Air from the Pro, making tradeoffs for a mass market that wanted portability while retaining Pro models for people who need more connectivity and power.

And that brings us to the Air vs. Pro divide again. Here’s the funny thing: the Air has gradually gotten closer to the Pro. Over time, the engineering requirements of mobility have made tradeoffs for thinness and lightness get easier, not harder.

Sure enough, the MacBook Air is improved today over the previous model.

  • Faster CPU: fifth generation Intel Core.
  • Refreshed graphics: integrated Intel HD Graphics 6000.
  • Thunderbolt 2, delivering up to 20Gbps.
  • Faster flash storage.

So, you want this MacBook Air more than you wanted the previous MacBook Air. And you do get Thunderbolt, which is cool for some audio hardware and storage expansion (and very cool for video, if you work with that).

The Air does hold its own with the MacBook Pro in terms of ports. You get two USB3 ports and a Thunderbolt port. (You’re just one Thunderbolt port shy of the Pro.) As the “all-new MacBook” stakes out consumer territory, the Air is drifting into producer territory. So let’s not start freaking out about how everything is turning into an iPad – it isn’t. (Apple thinks what Pros really want is Darth Vader’s powder room wastebasket, yes, but that’s another story. Hey, I want one, even if I can’t afford one.)

mbp15side

Still, even if the Air is improved, you probably still want the MacBook Pro. For a little less money and a half a pound less in weight, you have to settle for a non-Retina display, a slower processor, and an inability to max out internal storage or RAM as you can on the Pro. Oh, and the Pro also gives you a second Thunderbolt port and a better graphics card (Iris Graphics 6100 over Iris HD 6000) – those aren’t deal makers, but they’re a nice bonus.

Basically, everything is slightly better on the MacBook Pro 13″ with Retina Display:

The CPU is slightly faster – fifth generation Intel Core, 3.1 GHz tops.
The GPU is slightly faster – Intel 6100.
Flash storage can be up to two times faster (and it was already blazingly-fast on the previous model).
Battery life is slightly better.

And all of this is absolutely fantastic news —

— for anyone ready to buy the previous MacBook Pro. Why? Because the 13″ model is now something you can pick up in closeout sales. It was already a great mobile workhorse for audio production and even blazes nicely through light video work. I’m writing this on one now, and I abuse it sometimes 18 hours a day. (The 15″ remains appealing for its larger display and proper GPU, plus higher-grade specs, but the 13″ is a good choice on a budget.)

And there’s no reason to complain about the Pro. This machine is I think a great investment for a lot of people. The Retina Display is stunning, especially over long periods of use – and music apps are finally coming around to exploiting it. The internal RAM and storage is non-upgradeable, true – so max it out when you buy the machine. The price premium Apple charges is hefty, but you get high-spec, fast RAM and storage in return. (The internal flash drives are blazingly quick, and you really notice the difference in production tools. Plus, for big projects, you can always add fast USB and Thunderbolt media externally.) These are machines that can pay off their money you spend on them. You can make records; you can make iPhone apps. Nothing against PCs from other vendors – they still hold their own if you rely on the GPU, and desktop configuration works well, and a lot of people are happy with Windows. But Apple makes very competitive laptops.

I expect a lot of people will freak out about USB-C in the “all-new MacBook” and assume Apple is now coming for all your ports. I don’t think that’s the case for the forseeable future. Apple is showing a commitment to Thunderbolt as a “pro” bus – note Thunderbolt 2 on every single other model they sell.

The key is the word “Pro.” The advice I would give to anyone doing creative work is to buy the machine with “Pro” in the title, by astounding coincidence. So it seems Apple does have some strategy, and that involves what you want.

As for a watch, I recommend for now picking up a nice used Casio for a couple bucks if you tend to drop your iPhone on the pavement every time you look at the time. Speaking of which – ah, look at the time. I’ll let you all argue about this in comments. Have a nice night!

http://www.apple.com/mac/compare/

Photos courtesy Apple.

  • I have an Air, and I already have 2xUSB3 + Thunderbolt. So I think it is only the internals that are getting the update

    • Sorry, that’s correct – I may have temporarily lost my mind.

      The Pro nets you the better display and an extra Thunderbolt port, plus marginally better GPU. And the GPU generation bumped on both, so that GPU advantage remains.

  • I have an Air, and I already have 2xUSB3 + Thunderbolt. So I think it is only the internals that are getting the update

    • Sorry, that’s correct – I may have temporarily lost my mind.

      The Pro nets you the better display and an extra Thunderbolt port, plus marginally better GPU. And the GPU generation bumped on both, so that GPU advantage remains.

  • I have an Air, and I already have 2xUSB3 + Thunderbolt. So I think it is only the internals that are getting the update

    • Sorry, that’s correct – I may have temporarily lost my mind.

      The Pro nets you the better display and an extra Thunderbolt port, plus marginally better GPU. And the GPU generation bumped on both, so that GPU advantage remains.

  • Jon Monteverde

    Saw this link on Reddit Apple: the $80 USB-C hub to get USB/HDMI/power
    http://store.apple.com/us/product/MJ1K2AM/A/usb-c-digital-av-multiport-adapter?fnode=51

    • Yeah, added that. Helps a little. But I still would avoid this route.

      • Jon Monteverde

        I just went to a 2012 MBP 15″ last year so I wouldn’t upgrade anyway, although I’m a bit of a resolution fiend and the gold’s Retina resolution is bigger than mine maxed out.

  • xyzr_kx

    Saw this link on Reddit Apple: the $80 USB-C hub to get USB/HDMI/power
    http://store.apple.com/us/product/MJ1K2AM/A/usb-c-digital-av-multiport-adapter?fnode=51

    • Yeah, added that. Helps a little. But I still would avoid this route.

      • xyzr_kx

        I just went to a 2012 MBP 15″ last year so I wouldn’t upgrade anyway, although I’m a bit of a resolution fiend and the gold’s Retina resolution is bigger than mine maxed out.

  • xyzr_kx

    Saw this link on Reddit Apple: the $80 USB-C hub to get USB/HDMI/power
    http://store.apple.com/us/product/MJ1K2AM/A/usb-c-digital-av-multiport-adapter?fnode=51

    • Yeah, added that. Helps a little. But I still would avoid this route.

      • xyzr_kx

        I just went to a 2012 MBP 15″ last year so I wouldn’t upgrade anyway, although I’m a bit of a resolution fiend and the gold’s Retina resolution is bigger than mine maxed out.

  • chaircrusher

    … and those of us who managed to get by using faster, cheaper non-Apple laptops once again admire the industrial design and go back to using our cheap junk.

    • I’ll take issue with “faster.”

      Subtracting the GPU, which is bloody expensive to buy on the Apple side, almost everything else is competitive. A 13″ machine, especially if you grab a refurb/open box, has a display and RAM/storage performance that’s tough to beat even on that “cheap junk.”

      • aaron

        for a few months after release anyways.

  • chaircrusher

    … and those of us who managed to get by using faster, cheaper non-Apple laptops once again admire the industrial design and go back to using our cheap junk.

    • I’ll take issue with “faster.”

      Subtracting the GPU, which is bloody expensive to buy on the Apple side, almost everything else is competitive. A 13″ machine, especially if you grab a refurb/open box, has a display and RAM/storage performance that’s tough to beat even on that “cheap junk.”

      • aaron

        for a few months after release anyways.

  • chaircrusher

    … and those of us who managed to get by using faster, cheaper non-Apple laptops once again admire the industrial design and go back to using our cheap junk.

    • I’ll take issue with “faster.”

      Subtracting the GPU, which is bloody expensive to buy on the Apple side, almost everything else is competitive. A 13″ machine, especially if you grab a refurb/open box, has a display and RAM/storage performance that’s tough to beat even on that “cheap junk.”

      • aaron

        for a few months after release anyways.

  • teej

    I could see the pressure-sensitive trackpad offering some good MIDI/OSC control fun, assuming its accessible from 3rd party software. It looks outrageously large in relation to the size of the machine, and in the demo they talk about using it for handwriting, so it makes me wonder if tablet pens might be compatible in some way. Anyway, the 13″ Macbook Pro with Retina is the same price, and is the best machine I’ve ever owned (and it comes with the new trackpad)

  • teej

    I could see the pressure-sensitive trackpad offering some good MIDI/OSC control fun, assuming its accessible from 3rd party software. It looks outrageously large in relation to the size of the machine, and in the demo they talk about using it for handwriting, so it makes me wonder if tablet pens might be compatible in some way. Anyway, the 13″ Macbook Pro with Retina is the same price, and is the best machine I’ve ever owned (and it comes with the new trackpad)

  • teej

    I could see the pressure-sensitive trackpad offering some good MIDI/OSC control fun, assuming its accessible from 3rd party software. It looks outrageously large in relation to the size of the machine, and in the demo they talk about using it for handwriting, so it makes me wonder if tablet pens might be compatible in some way. Anyway, the 13″ Macbook Pro with Retina is the same price, and is the best machine I’ve ever owned (and it comes with the new trackpad)

  • lokey

    even the existing crop of pro models are crippled by adaptoritis. Im just glad i have 2011 model, ill nurse that along until im forced to hop to a windows box.

    • Not really. Two USB ports, two Thunderbolt ports, SD card slot. Adapteritis … how? Even the old video adapters from the 2011 model plug directly into Thunderbolt.

      Let me tell you about my experience with the model I got last summer:

      It’s faster.

      The display is the best on the market.

      The battery life is longer.

      The fan never kicks in.

      I’ve missed the old one … never.

      • lokey

        no ethernet, no firewire. your mileage may vary, but those two are daily usage for me.

        • Jj

          Thunderbolt adapters are good for those. I run my FireWire only MOTU Ultralite mk3 off the FireWire-thunderbolt adapter and its great. Adapter is tiny too.

          • ElectroB

            Actually, no, it’s not great. My 2007 MacBook Pro’s firewire port fully supported my MOTU interface. 2013, I buy a new Mac because I need more power. I now have to use an adapter, and Thunderbolt runs on lower power, so now I always need to plug my once 100% portable MOTU to DC power. Sure it runs without DC, but then you get constant audio dropouts. Plus, when the power installation is not professional and there are current fluctuations, I get occasional drop outs even with DC power (fortunately never happened on stage).

            Don’t get me wrong, it works, but 1) there are issues and 2) where the hell are those Thunderbolt interfaces that were going to flood the market?

            So I don’t think Apple has been making it easy for professionals these past 5 or 6 years. Personally, I would totally go for a heavier computer with extra power and ports, and if I keep running into these issues, in the long run I will join the ranks of those who are switching back to Windows. But let’s see how it plays out. Apple laptops are still the best in the market for music making, despite these shortcomings, but the gap with the competition is increasingly smaller.

          • Thunderbolt indeed provides power over the cable. You are right, it only provide 10W instead of 45W provided by FireWire800. But that usually is only affecting audio interfaces so that the number of available I/O or the max. bit depth or sample rate would be limited or the latency had to be increased. So, maybe you’d want to increase latency and see of those dropouts disappear?

          • ElectroB

            I actually forgot to mention something: when I plug in my MOTU with Thunderbolt and without DC power (like I used to do with Firewire) I’ve had occasions when the MOTU simply shuts down. Seriously. There is huge difference between 10W and 45W, indeed.

            In any case, I will take your suggestion and run some tests with higher latency and less I/O’s, and check if the behaviour is different.

            PS – this is what happens with my particular setup, macbook retina + MOTU Ultralite MK3; but I’m sure many people with other hardware/software configurations are probably not running into this problem.

        • Chymera

          There’s a thunderbolt connector for both of those – I use firewire on a daily basis and it works perfectly. I have to echo Peter above, my 2011 macbook was the biggest pile of steaming horse crap ever. The new retina is amazing, really a monumental piece of work and lightning fast. Thinner, battery lasts longer, retina looks better, fans are non-existent, ssd everything loads in seconds. Would never go back

      • Freeks

        My 2011 MBP will rock for years. 8GB ram, 256SSD system hd AND 750GB internal HD for all projects and samples. No need to carry external HD’s.

        My stage computer is 2007 MBP with 10.5 and Live 8. It’s been rock solid for 8 years on stage. Not a single crash in 8 years so i will never update my live machine. New computers can only dream on stability of older systems. I also have 2014 iMac as studio computer with Live 9 and it’s something that i would never bring to sessions that needs 100% stability.

        • Freeks

          Meh, it’s 2008 MBP so “only” 7 years of stability πŸ™‚
          As it’s stage computer it’s been dropped few times and it has had few beer showers and everything that happens on road. As a bonus it runs Rosetta that some apps like Korg Microkontroller editor needs.

          • ElectroB

            Sir, you are the very embodiment of evil for Apple sales division managers worldwide.

        • That’s great. Okay, I hear you on storage, though you can add storage easily via the USB or SD card slots. Otherwise, you can have essentially just as solid a machine new, as well.

          But yes, keep those old machines going. Unfortunately, mine *wasn’t* so reliable (same model) and the logic board failed.

          And I think your suspicions here on new versus old system reliability are not accurate. Repair rates as far as I know on the MacBook line have gone down. Your sample size is — one computer. πŸ˜‰

      • David

        Yeah, about those older MCPsr, I have the last non-retina model and am VERY happy almost 3 years in not to have impulse bought the newer machines. Currently have samsung 500GB main SSD, with a Toshiba 1.5tb HDD in the optical bay. That extra HD carries all my samples and bootcamp partition. Best investment I have made in a computer. period.

        I have a firewire audio interface from 2005 that still works amazingly well (go Metric Halo) – no need for adaptors. USB 3 for external drives if ever used – I also have a Dell external display with a USB 3 Hub, so I can connect 3 controllers, my phone and who knows what else through one cable. I upgraded to 16gb of RAM last year and installed it on my own without any problems.

        Like OP, Won’t buy another mac until I can stick at least 2gb in there. I am never going back to less than that. wouldn’t mind either if for pros (at least 15″), they were less worried about size and instead gave us most powerful laptop with big GPU and bigger battery and storage that still looks and acts like an apple product. Imagine if they had taken the retina technology and put it into the old aluminum body? It could have been a beast!

  • lokey

    even the existing crop of pro models are crippled by adaptoritis. Im just glad i have 2011 model, ill nurse that along until im forced to hop to a windows box.

    • Not really. Two USB ports, two Thunderbolt ports, SD card slot. Adapteritis … how? Even the old video adapters from the 2011 model plug directly into Thunderbolt.

      Let me tell you about my experience with the model I got last summer:

      It’s faster.

      The display is the best on the market.

      The battery life is longer.

      The fan never kicks in.

      I’ve missed the old one … never.

      • lokey

        no ethernet, no firewire. your mileage may vary, but those two are daily usage for me.

        • Jj

          Thunderbolt adapters are good for those. I run my FireWire only MOTU Ultralite mk3 off the FireWire-thunderbolt adapter and its great. Adapter is tiny too.

          • ElectroB

            Actually, no, it’s not great. My 2007 MacBook Pro’s firewire port fully supported my MOTU interface, with no need to plug in DC power.
            In 2013, I bought a new Mac because I needed more CPU and RAM, SSD, etc. I now have to use an adapter, and Thunderbolt runs on lower power, so now I always need to plug my once 100% portable MOTU to DC power. Sure it runs without DC, but then you risk audio dropouts. Plus, when the power installation is not professional and there are current fluctuations, I get occasional drop outs even with DC power (fortunately never happened on stage).

            Don’t get me wrong, it works, and I generally consider Apple laptops still the best thing for live music making, but 1) there are some annoying issues and 2) where the hell are those affordable Thunderbolt interfaces that were going to flood the market?

            So I don’t think Apple has been making it easy for professionals these past 5 or 6 years. Personally, I would totally go for a heavier computer with extra power and ports, and if I keep running into these issues, in the long run I will join the ranks of those who are switching back to Windows. But let’s see how it plays out.

          • Thunderbolt indeed provides power over the cable. You are right, it only provide 10W instead of 45W provided by FireWire800. But that usually is only affecting audio interfaces so that the number of available I/O or the max. bit depth or sample rate would be limited or the latency had to be increased. So, maybe you’d want to increase latency and see of those dropouts disappear?

          • ElectroB

            I actually forgot to mention something: when I plug in my MOTU with Thunderbolt and without DC power (like I used to do with Firewire) I’ve had occasions when the MOTU simply shuts down. Seriously. There is huge difference between 10W and 45W, indeed.

            In any case, I will take your suggestion and run some tests with higher latency and less I/O’s, and check if the behaviour is different.

            PS – this is what happens with my particular setup, macbook retina + MOTU Ultralite MK3; but I’m sure many people with other hardware/software configurations are probably not running into this problem.

        • Chymera

          There’s a thunderbolt connector for both of those – I use firewire on a daily basis and it works perfectly. I have to echo Peter above, my 2011 macbook was the biggest pile of steaming horse crap ever. The new retina is amazing, really a monumental piece of work and lightning fast. Thinner, battery lasts longer, retina looks better, fans are non-existent, ssd everything loads in seconds. Would never go back

      • Freeks

        My 2011 MBP will rock for years. 8GB ram, 256SSD system hd AND 750GB internal HD for all projects and samples. No need to carry external HD’s.

        My stage computer is 2007 MBP with 10.5 and Live 8. It’s been rock solid for 8 years on stage. Not a single crash in 8 years so i will never update my live machine. New computers can only dream on stability of older systems. I also have 2014 iMac as studio computer with Live 9 and it’s something that i would never bring to sessions that needs 100% stability.

        • Freeks

          Meh, it’s 2008 MBP so “only” 7 years of stability πŸ™‚
          As it’s stage computer it’s been dropped few times and it has had few beer showers and everything that happens on road. As a bonus it runs Rosetta that some apps like Korg Microkontroller editor needs.

          • ElectroB

            Sir, you are the very embodiment of evil for Apple sales division managers worldwide.

        • That’s great. Okay, I hear you on storage, though you can add storage easily via the USB or SD card slots. Otherwise, you can have essentially just as solid a machine new, as well.

          But yes, keep those old machines going. Unfortunately, mine *wasn’t* so reliable (same model) and the logic board failed.

          And I think your suspicions here on new versus old system reliability are not accurate. Repair rates as far as I know on the MacBook line have gone down. Your sample size is — one computer. πŸ˜‰

      • David

        Yeah, about those older MCPsr, I have the last non-retina model and am VERY happy almost 3 years in not to have impulse bought the newer machines. Currently have samsung 500GB main SSD, with a Toshiba 1.5tb HDD in the optical bay. That extra HD carries all my samples and bootcamp partition. Best investment I have made in a computer. period.

        I have a firewire audio interface from 2005 that still works amazingly well (go Metric Halo) – no need for adaptors. USB 3 for external drives if ever used – I also have a Dell external display with a USB 3 Hub, so I can connect 3 controllers, my phone and who knows what else through one cable. I upgraded to 16gb of RAM last year and installed it on my own without any problems.

        Like OP, Won’t buy another mac until I can stick at least 2gb in there. I am never going back to less than that. wouldn’t mind either if for pros (at least 15″), they were less worried about size and instead gave us most powerful laptop with big GPU and bigger battery and storage that still looks and acts like an apple product. Imagine if they had taken the retina technology and put it into the old aluminum body? It could have been a beast!

  • lokey

    even the existing crop of pro models are crippled by adaptoritis. Im just glad i have 2011 model, ill nurse that along until im forced to hop to a windows box.

    • Not really. Two USB ports, two Thunderbolt ports, SD card slot. Adapteritis … how? Even the old video adapters from the 2011 model plug directly into Thunderbolt.

      Let me tell you about my experience with the model I got last summer:

      It’s faster.

      The display is the best on the market.

      The battery life is longer.

      The fan never kicks in.

      I’ve missed the old one … never.

      • lokey

        no ethernet, no firewire. your mileage may vary, but those two are daily usage for me.

        • Jj

          Thunderbolt adapters are good for those. I run my FireWire only MOTU Ultralite mk3 off the FireWire-thunderbolt adapter and its great. Adapter is tiny too.

          • Elekb

            Actually, no, it’s not great. My 2007 MacBook Pro’s firewire port fully supported my MOTU interface, with no need to plug in DC power.
            In 2013, I bought a new Mac because I needed more CPU and RAM, SSD, etc. I now have to use an adapter, and Thunderbolt runs on lower power, so now I always need to plug my once 100% portable MOTU to DC power. Sure it runs without DC, but then you risk audio dropouts. Plus, when the power installation is not professional and there are current fluctuations, I get occasional drop outs even with DC power (fortunately never happened on stage).

            Don’t get me wrong, it works, and I generally consider Apple laptops still the best thing for live music making, but 1) there are some annoying issues and 2) where the hell are those affordable Thunderbolt interfaces that were going to flood the market?

            So I don’t think Apple has been making it easy for professionals these past 5 or 6 years. Personally, I would totally go for a heavier computer with extra power and ports, and if I keep running into these issues, in the long run I will join the ranks of those who are switching back to Windows. But let’s see how it plays out.

          • Thunderbolt indeed provides power over the cable. You are right, it only provide 10W instead of 45W provided by FireWire800. But that usually is only affecting audio interfaces so that the number of available I/O or the max. bit depth or sample rate would be limited or the latency had to be increased. So, maybe you’d want to increase latency and see of those dropouts disappear?

          • Elekb

            I actually forgot to mention something: when I plug in my MOTU with Thunderbolt and without DC power (like I used to do with Firewire) I’ve had occasions when the MOTU simply shuts down. Seriously. There is huge difference between 10W and 45W, indeed.

            In any case, I will take your suggestion and run some tests with higher latency and less I/O’s, and check if the behaviour is different.

            PS – this is what happens with my particular setup, macbook retina + MOTU Ultralite MK3; but I’m sure many people with other hardware/software configurations are probably not running into this problem.

        • Chymera

          There’s a thunderbolt connector for both of those – I use firewire on a daily basis and it works perfectly. I have to echo Peter above, my 2011 macbook was the biggest pile of steaming horse crap ever. The new retina is amazing, really a monumental piece of work and lightning fast. Thinner, battery lasts longer, retina looks better, fans are non-existent, ssd everything loads in seconds. Would never go back

      • Freeks

        My 2011 MBP will rock for years. 8GB ram, 256SSD system hd AND 750GB internal HD for all projects and samples. No need to carry external HD’s.

        My stage computer is 2007 MBP with 10.5 and Live 8. It’s been rock solid for 8 years on stage. Not a single crash in 8 years so i will never update my live machine. New computers can only dream on stability of older systems. I also have 2014 iMac as studio computer with Live 9 and it’s something that i would never bring to sessions that needs 100% stability.

        • Freeks

          Meh, it’s 2008 MBP so “only” 7 years of stability πŸ™‚
          As it’s stage computer it’s been dropped few times and it has had few beer showers and everything that happens on road. As a bonus it runs Rosetta that some apps like Korg Microkontroller editor needs.

          • Elekb

            Sir, you are the very embodiment of evil for Apple sales division managers worldwide.

        • That’s great. Okay, I hear you on storage, though you can add storage easily via the USB or SD card slots. Otherwise, you can have essentially just as solid a machine new, as well.

          But yes, keep those old machines going. Unfortunately, mine *wasn’t* so reliable (same model) and the logic board failed.

          And I think your suspicions here on new versus old system reliability are not accurate. Repair rates as far as I know on the MacBook line have gone down. Your sample size is — one computer. πŸ˜‰

      • David

        Yeah, about those older MCPsr, I have the last non-retina model and am VERY happy almost 3 years in not to have impulse bought the newer machines. Currently have samsung 500GB main SSD, with a Toshiba 1.5tb HDD in the optical bay. That extra HD carries all my samples and bootcamp partition. Best investment I have made in a computer. period.

        I have a firewire audio interface from 2005 that still works amazingly well (go Metric Halo) – no need for adaptors. USB 3 for external drives if ever used – I also have a Dell external display with a USB 3 Hub, so I can connect 3 controllers, my phone and who knows what else through one cable. I upgraded to 16gb of RAM last year and installed it on my own without any problems.

        Like OP, Won’t buy another mac until I can stick at least 2gb in there. I am never going back to less than that. wouldn’t mind either if for pros (at least 15″), they were less worried about size and instead gave us most powerful laptop with big GPU and bigger battery and storage that still looks and acts like an apple product. Imagine if they had taken the retina technology and put it into the old aluminum body? It could have been a beast!

  • NathanaΓ«l

    I wish the powerbrick of the new Macbook would double as a hdmi/usb hub… would seem elegant.

    • I agree – Apple had a chance to do something nice here and seem … not to care. πŸ˜‰ On the other hand, as I said, I wouldn’t buy or recommend this model anyway.

  • NathanaΓ«l

    I wish the powerbrick of the new Macbook would double as a hdmi/usb hub… would seem elegant.

    • I agree – Apple had a chance to do something nice here and seem … not to care. πŸ˜‰ On the other hand, as I said, I wouldn’t buy or recommend this model anyway.

  • NathanaΓ«l

    I wish the powerbrick of the new Macbook would double as a hdmi/usb hub… would seem elegant.

    • I agree – Apple had a chance to do something nice here and seem … not to care. πŸ˜‰ On the other hand, as I said, I wouldn’t buy or recommend this model anyway.

  • jordan314

    This sounds insanely inconvenient at best. The one USB-C port is also the charging port. And it doesn’t seem compatible with thunderbolt, only power, USB, display port, HDMI, USB, and VGA. Am I wrong? http://www.apple.com/macbook/design/

    • It’s simply a question of use cases. If it’s not for you, don’t consider buying it.

  • jordan314

    This sounds insanely inconvenient at best. The one USB-C port is also the charging port. And it doesn’t seem compatible with thunderbolt, only power, USB, display port, HDMI, USB, and VGA. Am I wrong? http://www.apple.com/macbook/design/

    • It’s simply a question of use cases. If it’s not for you, don’t consider buying it.

  • jordan314

    This sounds insanely inconvenient at best. The one USB-C port is also the charging port. And it doesn’t seem compatible with thunderbolt, only power, USB, display port, HDMI, USB, and VGA. Am I wrong? http://www.apple.com/macbook/design/

    • It’s simply a question of use cases. If it’s not for you, don’t consider buying it.

  • Mutis Mayfield

    There are resellers who sell upgraded macs cheaper than apple (in my country macnificos do a great job). I should to advice my nephew for graphic design and she buyed the old macbook pro full upgraded (ssd+16gb of ram) for less of 1500 euros. She has got mac for years.
    I see this coming when I purchased my mini mac…

  • Mutis Mayfield

    There are resellers who sell upgraded macs cheaper than apple (in my country macnificos do a great job). I should to advice my nephew for graphic design and she buyed the old macbook pro full upgraded (ssd+16gb of ram) for less of 1500 euros. She has got mac for years.
    I see this coming when I purchased my mini mac…

  • Mutis Mayfield

    There are resellers who sell upgraded macs cheaper than apple (in my country macnificos do a great job). I should to advice my nephew for graphic design and she buyed the old macbook pro full upgraded (ssd+16gb of ram) for less of 1500 euros. She has got mac for years.
    I see this coming when I purchased my mini mac…

  • Ronan Macdonald

    The thing that never seems to get mentioned about the 13″ MacBook Pro is that, although it’s Retina, in terms of ‘how much’ you actually see onscreen, it’s effectively only 1280×800 at default 4x-pixel viewing. The 13″ Air, on the other hand, is straight-up 1440×900, which makes quite a difference with your average non-vector-based DAW GUI.

    (Unless I’m missing something, having never owned a Retina Mac. I assume it starts looking a bit weird at anything between default and maximum res, which would just be unworkable, right?)

    • Charles

      I run my 15″ Retina MBP at the “looks like 1680×1050” setting, which is 1.7 physical pixels per rendered pixel, and it looks fine – which is the point of a Retina display, the pixels are small enough that you can’t see the interpolation.

      • Charles

        (Be careful, it’s one of those things where you’re fine without it until you see the difference in person, and then you can’t stop seeing the difference.)

    • That’s true, but … the legibility on the 13″ is exceptional. In my view, it’s very worth it, and I spend a *lot* of hours looking at the display. (What you’re describing was also mentioned in every review I saw of the MBP 13″ Retina, so I’m not totally sure what you’re talking about in that regard…)

      The 15″ for me was just too pricey, and I find the 13″ display very comfortable to use. I only wish more UIs were more economical with their screen real estate usage.

      • Ronan Macdonald

        The reviews were quite a while ago, Peter – it’s possible I didn’t have any interest in the issue until more recently. πŸ˜‰

        But yeah, couldn’t agree more on the UI thing. Particularly with regard to Logic, ironically.

    • I have tried all possible screen resolutions on my 13″ rMBP – native and scaled – and all of them are perfectly fine, considering OS X’s capability to scale and place UI objects anywhere on the screen.

      The problem is rather in applications not being built (or optimised) for other than one specific resolution, which makes it a pain in the neck to run them at anything but the “default” scaled 1280×800 pixels. Or, alternatively, applications that are not optimised for Apple’s Retina solution either – like Ableton Live just until very recently.

      I must admit though that using a 13″ screen at native 2560×1600 pixels is a tad small on the eyes, but that would be a general concern and not specific to the MacBook Pro…

  • Ronan Macdonald

    The thing that never seems to get mentioned about the 13″ MacBook Pro is that, although it’s Retina, in terms of ‘how much’ you actually see onscreen, it’s effectively only 1280×800 at default 4x-pixel viewing. The 13″ Air, on the other hand, is straight-up 1440×900, which makes quite a difference with your average non-vector-based DAW GUI.

    (Unless I’m missing something, having never owned a Retina Mac. I assume it starts looking a bit weird at anything between default and maximum res, which would just be unworkable, right?)

    EDIT: Just seen that the 13″ rMBP offers scaled 1440×900 mode, amongst others, so I stand, er, self-corrected. Surely, it looks a bit off, though, at 1.77 physical pixels per rendered pixel, no..?

    • Charles

      I run my 15″ Retina MBP at the “looks like 1680×1050” setting, which is 1.7 physical pixels per rendered pixel, and it looks fine – which is the point of a Retina display, the pixels are small enough that you can’t see the interpolation.

      • Charles

        (Be careful, it’s one of those things where you’re fine without it until you see the difference in person, and then you can’t stop seeing the difference.)

    • That’s true, but … the legibility on the 13″ is exceptional. In my view, it’s very worth it, and I spend a *lot* of hours looking at the display. (What you’re describing was also mentioned in every review I saw of the MBP 13″ Retina, so I’m not totally sure what you’re talking about in that regard…)

      The 15″ for me was just too pricey, and I find the 13″ display very comfortable to use. I only wish more UIs were more economical with their screen real estate usage.

      • Ronan Macdonald

        The reviews were quite a while ago, Peter – it’s possible I didn’t have any interest in the issue until more recently. πŸ˜‰

        But yeah, couldn’t agree more on the UI thing. Particularly with regard to Logic, ironically.

    • I have tried all possible screen resolutions on my 13″ rMBP – native and scaled – and all of them are perfectly fine, considering OS X’s capability to scale and place UI objects anywhere on the screen.

      The problem is rather in applications not being built (or optimised) for other than one specific resolution, which makes it a pain in the neck to run them at anything but the “default” scaled 1280×800 pixels. Or, alternatively, applications that are not optimised for Apple’s Retina solution either – like Ableton Live just until very recently.

      I must admit though that using a 13″ screen at native 2560×1600 pixels is a tad small on the eyes, but that would be a general concern and not specific to the MacBook Pro…

  • Ronan Macdonald

    The thing that never seems to get mentioned about the 13″ MacBook Pro is that, although it’s Retina, in terms of ‘how much’ you actually see onscreen, it’s effectively only 1280×800 at default 4x-pixel viewing. The 13″ Air, on the other hand, is straight-up 1440×900, which makes quite a difference with your average non-vector-based DAW GUI.

    (Unless I’m missing something, having never owned a Retina Mac. I assume it starts looking a bit weird at anything between default and maximum res, which would just be unworkable, right?)

    EDIT: Just seen that the 13″ rMBP offers scaled 1440×900 mode, amongst others, so I stand, er, self-corrected. Surely, it looks a bit off, though, at 1.77 physical pixels per rendered pixel, no..?

    • Charles

      I run my 15″ Retina MBP at the “looks like 1680×1050” setting, which is 1.7 physical pixels per rendered pixel, and it looks fine – which is the point of a Retina display, the pixels are small enough that you can’t see the interpolation.

      • Charles

        (Be careful, it’s one of those things where you’re fine without it until you see the difference in person, and then you can’t stop seeing the difference.)

    • That’s true, but … the legibility on the 13″ is exceptional. In my view, it’s very worth it, and I spend a *lot* of hours looking at the display. (What you’re describing was also mentioned in every review I saw of the MBP 13″ Retina, so I’m not totally sure what you’re talking about in that regard…)

      The 15″ for me was just too pricey, and I find the 13″ display very comfortable to use. I only wish more UIs were more economical with their screen real estate usage.

      • Ronan Macdonald

        The reviews were quite a while ago, Peter – it’s possible I didn’t have any interest in the issue until more recently. πŸ˜‰

        But yeah, couldn’t agree more on the UI thing. Particularly with regard to Logic, ironically.

    • I have tried all possible screen resolutions on my 13″ rMBP – native and scaled – and all of them are perfectly fine, considering OS X’s capability to scale and place UI objects anywhere on the screen.

      The problem is rather in applications not being built (or optimised) for other than one specific resolution, which makes it a pain in the neck to run them at anything but the “default” scaled 1280×800 pixels. Or, alternatively, applications that are not optimised for Apple’s Retina solution either – like Ableton Live just until very recently.

      I must admit though that using a 13″ screen at native 2560×1600 pixels is a tad small on the eyes, but that would be a general concern and not specific to the MacBook Pro…

  • Jj

    Totally agree with your analysis Peter. As beautiful as it is, this new 12″ Macbook is very weak for production and it’s not cheap. Next years revision may be better if CPU gets stronger. The best bet for light portable Apple production laptop is definitely 13″ pro as you said, it’s light and powerful enough, and once you go retina, it’s hard to go back. 15″ is not portable enough for traveling (having travelled with one a lot).

    15″ has no update yet until Intel releases quad core broadwell CPU.

    • Yeah, that 15″ update could be one to watch.

    • In fact, “once you go retina”, you’ll never go back. πŸ˜€

  • Jj

    Totally agree with your analysis Peter. As beautiful as it is, this new 12″ Macbook is very weak for production and it’s not cheap. Next years revision may be better if CPU gets stronger. The best bet for light portable Apple production laptop is definitely 13″ pro as you said, it’s light and powerful enough, and once you go retina, it’s hard to go back. 15″ is not portable enough for traveling (having travelled with one a lot).

    15″ has no update yet until Intel releases quad core broadwell CPU.

    • Yeah, that 15″ update could be one to watch.

    • In fact, “once you go retina”, you’ll never go back. πŸ˜€

  • Jj

    Totally agree with your analysis Peter. As beautiful as it is, this new 12″ Macbook is very weak for production and it’s not cheap. Next years revision may be better if CPU gets stronger. The best bet for light portable Apple production laptop is definitely 13″ pro as you said, it’s light and powerful enough, and once you go retina, it’s hard to go back. 15″ is not portable enough for traveling (having travelled with one a lot).

    15″ has no update yet until Intel releases quad core broadwell CPU.

    • Yeah, that 15″ update could be one to watch.

    • In fact, “once you go retina”, you’ll never go back. πŸ˜€

  • Robin Parmar

    Apple continues to over-price and dumb down their computers. Meanwhile my Thinkpad works just fine and has approximately four thousand ports. Cost me under 200 bucks.

    • Random Chance

      I don’t know what kind of Thinkpad you bought, but the Thinkpad I recently bought used cost me roughly 1000 Euro. And new Thinkpads that are worth buying easily sell for double that amount with all the accesories and upgrades a pro customer is likely to buy such as bigger battery, docking station, cellular modem, more RAM, bigger SSD, and so on. Having seen quite a few different laptops and brands in my time, I honestly don’t see how someone who does not need a “true” docking station, cellular conncetivity built-in, and maybe a fingerprint sensor, would not consider buying a MacBook instead. Oh, and there’s the touchpoint. But then again: Apple has far, far superior touchpads, some of the ones Lenovo offered are a total catastrophe and the current ones are not stellar either, barely OK I would say. Perhaps if Apple came out with a ultraportable computer for the working professional (as in: a person who has a docking station with monitors, keyboard, mouse, and stuff set up at the office and at home, needs easy cellular connectivity on the road) that was not a compromise on those points that Lenovo gets mostly right, people would stop complaining. Well, except for the people who are happy to buy cheap computers. They are a different market.

      • DPrty

        Lenovo is a very bad computer company and probably not the right manufacturer for comparisons.

      • Don’t feed the troll.

  • Robin Parmar

    Apple continues to over-price and dumb down their computers. Meanwhile my Thinkpad works just fine and has approximately four thousand ports. Cost me under 200 bucks.

    • Random Chance

      I don’t know what kind of Thinkpad you bought, but the Thinkpad I recently bought used cost me roughly 1000 Euro. And new Thinkpads that are worth buying easily sell for double that amount with all the accesories and upgrades a pro customer is likely to buy such as bigger battery, docking station, cellular modem, more RAM, bigger SSD, and so on. Having seen quite a few different laptops and brands in my time, I honestly don’t see how someone who does not need a “true” docking station, cellular conncetivity built-in, and maybe a fingerprint sensor, would not consider buying a MacBook instead. Oh, and there’s the touchpoint. But then again: Apple has far, far superior touchpads, some of the ones Lenovo offered are a total catastrophe and the current ones are not stellar either, barely OK I would say. Perhaps if Apple came out with a ultraportable computer for the working professional (as in: a person who has a docking station with monitors, keyboard, mouse, and stuff set up at the office and at home, needs easy cellular connectivity on the road) that was not a compromise on those points that Lenovo gets mostly right, people would stop complaining. Well, except for the people who are happy to buy cheap computers. They are a different market.

      • DPrty

        Lenovo is a very bad computer company and probably not the right manufacturer for comparisons.

      • Don’t feed the troll.

  • Apple continues to over-price and dumb down their computers. Meanwhile my Thinkpad works just fine and has approximately four thousand ports. Cost me under 200 bucks.

    • Random Chance

      I don’t know what kind of Thinkpad you bought, but the Thinkpad I recently bought used cost me roughly 1000 Euro. And new Thinkpads that are worth buying easily sell for double that amount with all the accesories and upgrades a pro customer is likely to buy such as bigger battery, docking station, cellular modem, more RAM, bigger SSD, and so on. Having seen quite a few different laptops and brands in my time, I honestly don’t see how someone who does not need a “true” docking station, cellular conncetivity built-in, and maybe a fingerprint sensor, would not consider buying a MacBook instead. Oh, and there’s the touchpoint. But then again: Apple has far, far superior touchpads, some of the ones Lenovo offered are a total catastrophe and the current ones are not stellar either, barely OK I would say. Perhaps if Apple came out with a ultraportable computer for the working professional (as in: a person who has a docking station with monitors, keyboard, mouse, and stuff set up at the office and at home, needs easy cellular connectivity on the road) that was not a compromise on those points that Lenovo gets mostly right, people would stop complaining. Well, except for the people who are happy to buy cheap computers. They are a different market.

      • DPrty

        Lenovo is a very bad computer company and probably not the right manufacturer for comparisons.

      • Don’t feed the troll.

  • DPrty

    Ah well … Yall would get more done if you owned an Atari St. Also.. how do you make an evil laughing devil face symbol with one of these keyboard doohickey things.

  • DPrty

    Ah well … Yall would get more done if you owned an Atari St. Also.. how do you make an evil laughing devil face symbol with one of these keyboard doohickey things.

  • DPrty

    Ah well … Yall would get more done if you owned an Atari St. Also.. how do you make an evil laughing devil face symbol with one of these keyboard doohickey things.

  • Matt Leaf

    I love the Air. It’s kinda crazy that now by comparison it has some grunt. My 11″ is now 2 years old. If I was to upgrade, strangely, I would buy another 11″. I don’t care about retina really. But you also get 2 usb ports – great for say, a controller and charging earphone at the same time. The main bummer about my machine is that it was the model that had the lame battery life before they upgraded it to 9 hours, which is heaps i think. And that other bonus being the Core 2 Duo’s. Which I don’t have here. To me the Air is the perfect vacation laptop. Chilling, sketching out ideas.

  • Matt Leaf

    I love the Air. It’s kinda crazy that now by comparison it has some grunt. My 11″ is now 2 years old. If I was to upgrade, strangely, I would buy another 11″. I don’t care about retina really. But you also get 2 usb ports – great for say, a controller and charging your phone at the same time. The main bummer about my machine is that it was the model that had the lame battery life before they upgraded it to 9 hours, which is heaps i think. And that other bonus being the Core 2 Duo’s. Which I don’t have here. To me the Air is the perfect vacation laptop. Chilling, sketching out ideas. So light.

  • Matt Leaf

    I love the Air. It’s kinda crazy that now by comparison it has some grunt. My 11″ is now 2 years old. If I was to upgrade, strangely, I would buy another 11″. I don’t care about retina really. But you also get 2 usb ports – great for say, a controller and charging your phone at the same time. The main bummer about my machine is that it was the model that had the lame battery life before they upgraded it to 9 hours, which is heaps i think. And that other bonus being the Core 2 Duo’s. Which I don’t have here. To me the Air is the perfect vacation laptop. Chilling, sketching out ideas. So light.

  • VirtualMark

    Lol, I like the watch recommendation at the end. I have to agree though, those iWatches don’t do a lot and are very expensive(especially the $10,000 gold version).

    This new MacBook looks rubbish, can’t believe they thought that having one port is a good idea. You could get a PC laptop for a third of the price that does a hell of a lot more than this machine, although it wouldn’t be as elegant.

    • foljs

      “”” I have to agree though, those iWatches don’t do a lot and are very expensive(especially the $10,000 gold version).”””

      The basic selling point of a gold watch of any brand is that IT IS expensive.

      It’s for people who buy expensive, and buy it BECAUSE it’s expensive.

      • VirtualMark

        Sure, like expensive jewellery. Except in this case, the watch is worthless as it doesn’t have much gold value, and the electronics will be obsolete in a couple of years.

        It’s for people with more money than sense. If they have that much cash then why not give it to someone who needs it?

        I can’t find the link, but I think there was an expensive iphone wallpaper a few years back, about Β£1000, that people bought just because it’s expensive. Idiots.

        • Fortunately, this isn’t a wristwatch site, and we don’t have to worry about gold Apple Watches.

          I had looked briefly at developer possibilities, but as that picture has developed, it seems that this really won’t be such an interesting playing field for a while. Even in wearable tech specifically, there are more interesting music stories.

  • VirtualMark

    Lol, I like the watch recommendation at the end. I have to agree though, those iWatches don’t do a lot and are very expensive(especially the $10,000 gold version).

    This new MacBook looks rubbish, can’t believe they thought that having one port is a good idea. You could get a PC laptop for a third of the price that does a hell of a lot more than this machine, although it wouldn’t be as elegant.

    • foljs

      “”” I have to agree though, those iWatches don’t do a lot and are very expensive(especially the $10,000 gold version).”””

      The basic selling point of a gold watch of any brand is that IT IS expensive.

      It’s for people who buy expensive, and buy it BECAUSE it’s expensive.

      • VirtualMark

        Sure, like expensive jewellery. Except in this case, the watch is worthless as it doesn’t have much gold value, and the electronics will be obsolete in a couple of years.

        It’s for people with more money than sense. If they have that much cash then why not give it to someone who needs it?

        I can’t find the link, but I think there was an expensive iphone wallpaper a few years back, about Β£1000, that people bought just because it’s expensive. Idiots.

        • Fortunately, this isn’t a wristwatch site, and we don’t have to worry about gold Apple Watches.

          I had looked briefly at developer possibilities, but as that picture has developed, it seems that this really won’t be such an interesting playing field for a while. Even in wearable tech specifically, there are more interesting music stories.

  • VirtualMark

    Lol, I like the watch recommendation at the end. I have to agree though, those iWatches don’t do a lot and are very expensive(especially the $10,000 gold version).

    This new MacBook looks rubbish, can’t believe they thought that having one port is a good idea. You could get a PC laptop for a third of the price that does a hell of a lot more than this machine, although it wouldn’t be as elegant.

    • foljs

      “”” I have to agree though, those iWatches don’t do a lot and are very expensive(especially the $10,000 gold version).”””

      The basic selling point of a gold watch of any brand is that IT IS expensive.

      It’s for people who buy expensive, and buy it BECAUSE it’s expensive.

      • VirtualMark

        Sure, like expensive jewellery. Except in this case, the watch is worthless as it doesn’t have much gold value, and the electronics will be obsolete in a couple of years.

        It’s for people with more money than sense. If they have that much cash then why not give it to someone who needs it?

        I can’t find the link, but I think there was an expensive iphone wallpaper a few years back, about Β£1000, that people bought just because it’s expensive. Idiots.

        • Fortunately, this isn’t a wristwatch site, and we don’t have to worry about gold Apple Watches.

          I had looked briefly at developer possibilities, but as that picture has developed, it seems that this really won’t be such an interesting playing field for a while. Even in wearable tech specifically, there are more interesting music stories.

  • SamueleC

    I just wanna know what is apple profit margin on this product ( reasonably high i suspect) , and how much would have cost to add , at least another usb connector or thunderbolt .

    But i see why a corporation would spend 10 $ to add some ports ( and even less given economy of scale ) when it can ‘force’ its customers to pay 80$ for an adapter/hub which would be a bare necessity for the 90% of users , at least Apple could have given it for free with the laptop ; profit maximization at its best

    • The machine is likely too slim to accommodate additional ports.

      Yes, Apple is a publicly-traded company driven by maximizing shareholder value through profit.

      But this is actually a function of literal height.

  • Dr. Strangelove

    I just wanna know what is apple profit margin on this product ( reasonably high i suspect) , and how much would have cost to add , at least another usb connector or thunderbolt .

    But i see why a corporation would spend 10 $ to add some ports ( and even less given economy of scale ) when it can ‘force’ its customers to pay 80$ for an adapter/hub which would be a bare necessity for the 90% of users , at least Apple could have given it for free with the laptop ; profit maximization at its best

    • The machine is likely too slim to accommodate additional ports.

      Yes, Apple is a publicly-traded company driven by maximizing shareholder value through profit.

      But this is actually a function of literal height.

  • Lorem Ipsum

    I just wanna know what is apple profit margin on this product ( reasonably high i suspect) , and how much would have cost to add , at least another usb connector or thunderbolt .

    But i see why a corporation would spend 10 $ to add some ports ( and even less given economy of scale ) when it can ‘force’ its customers to pay 80$ for an adapter/hub which would be a bare necessity for the 90% of users , at least Apple could have given it for free with the laptop ; profit maximization at its best

    • The machine is likely too slim to accommodate additional ports.

      Yes, Apple is a publicly-traded company driven by maximizing shareholder value through profit.

      But this is actually a function of literal height.

  • Norma Sesser

    I have an Apple Air. If you travel between places a lot, then you should get an Air, because it’s extremely light. However, if you prefer raw power over portability, get the Pro. reviews essay writing service

  • And NO headphone output. What were they thinking? Apple Watch without a camera (#selfie)…

  • And NO headphone output. What were they thinking? Apple Watch without a camera (#selfie)…

  • And NO headphone output. What were they thinking? Apple Watch without a camera (#selfie)…

  • James

    I’m not spiritually tethered to Apple as such but I have found for music making it is always nice to be able to – at least in theory – plug and play. I bought into the whole iPad thing and found myself wanting a complete DAW and mousing again…as a starter for ideas it’s always fun but not long before I hit a wall. I’m open to the idea that the new MacBook could be the business – if we see a lot of Bluetooth capable peripherals….ie decent controllers, speakers that arent “lossy” in quality etc. I think if the bits and pieces keep pace with these “minimalist” design choices then it’ll be liberating rather than annoying to work with these.

  • James

    I’m not spiritually tethered to Apple as such but I have found for music making it is always nice to be able to – at least in theory – plug and play. I bought into the whole iPad thing and found myself wanting a complete DAW and mousing again…as a starter for ideas it’s always fun but not long before I hit a wall. I’m open to the idea that the new MacBook could be the business – if we see a lot of Bluetooth capable peripherals….ie decent controllers, speakers that arent “lossy” in quality etc. I think if the bits and pieces keep pace with these “minimalist” design choices then it’ll be liberating rather than annoying to work with these.

  • James

    I’m not spiritually tethered to Apple as such but I have found for music making it is always nice to be able to – at least in theory – plug and play. I bought into the whole iPad thing and found myself wanting a complete DAW and mousing again…as a starter for ideas it’s always fun but not long before I hit a wall. I’m open to the idea that the new MacBook could be the business – if we see a lot of Bluetooth capable peripherals….ie decent controllers, speakers that arent “lossy” in quality etc. I think if the bits and pieces keep pace with these “minimalist” design choices then it’ll be liberating rather than annoying to work with these.

  • Grzegorz Bojanek

    Apple constantly introduces new ports cause their stupid policy is to earn loads of money on adapters. That is what happens for years… I really like the first Intel MacBooks (white and black). I have the 2008 MacBook white and it is really reliable with Snow Leopard. (actually I am using it now as I write this). I changed the HDD to 500 GB and RAM to 4GB and I can still use it on stage with smaller setups. What is more I can easily use it with Gleetchlab or Forester. And of course it has all ports which are essential. I have the 2014 MacBook Pro 13″ with i7 for music, but I still use the old machine easily.

    • USB-C is a PC standard with backing from vendors apart from just Apple.

    • foljs

      “””Apple constantly introduces new ports cause their stupid policy is to earn loads of money on adapters. “””

      Actually I very much doubt that adapters amount to anything to even like 1/200 of their revenue.

      They are just expensive because they are built to classic Apple standards (see breakdowns of cheapo chinese and apple adaptors and cables in review sites), and not enough people buy them to bring the price that much down — plus they have the Apple 40% profit margin on top.

      • Grzegorz Bojanek

        So why change good ports to something new? You know, I have an old FA-66 Interface, and it is powered with FireWire 400. I can use it with my old MacBook – no problem, I can use it with the MacBooks which have FW800 – this FW800 still powers the Interface through the cable. Now I have a new MacBook Pro only with Thunderbolt – I had to buy the adapter which changes Thunderbolt into FW800 + a cable FW800 – FW400. And Thunderbolt adapter does not power the Interface, so I have to use the external AC/DC adapter to power the Interface. Big loss on the mobile setup which is essential for me and my gigs…

        You know – they probably do not earn much, but I think that most people will still buy the adapters from Apple, and I think that the sellers will immediately encourage the customers to buy one – cause what can you do with that new USB C when nothing supports it?

        • USB-C is the new standard on the PC side. The “why change” answer is – faster bandwidth. It’s just not there yet.

          Thunderbolt – there, we can answer that more easily. Performance is already better with Thunderbolt than with even FW800. You can add more devices to the chain, and even with just one device, we’re seeing more consistent low-latency performance.

          • Grzegorz Bojanek

            Of course, but still – all those changes tell me that I need to change my old Edirol FA-66, which is still good for me, reliable (was with me on many long trips, tours, etc). Do I really need to change a good interface, because I have a new Thunderbolt? I think NO! As I say – it still works quite well, but the adapter Thunderbolt-FW800 does not transfer power to the interface, and I need to plug (and take on tour) the additional AD/DC adapter, which takes space in my small hand luggage where I have all my instruments and DIY stuff. So all those rapid changes are not very good for me as a user who is not so rich, that can buy a new interface with the new MacBook Pro.

          • Well, I would say: If you can afford a new $1500-2000 MacBook Pro, you could also afford a new $100-200 audio interface with USB that would be bus-powered and with at least the same audio quality and I/O specs as your 7-year-old FW audio interface…

            http://www.thomann.de/gb/search.html?filter=true&gk=coaius&feature-9961=true

          • Grzegorz Bojanek

            No I can’t man! (Maybe I shouldn’t say anything about the reality of salaries in Eastern Europe, but just to open your eyes: After 17 years of work I earn half of money that a person starting the same job I do, but in Germany, and in fact being an intern for 2 years – After 17 years I get about 550 EUR, and the person starting the same job in Germany gets about 1100 EUR). You know – I collected money for a very long time to get the new machine, and the money comes from my music sales, gigs, cause I cannot afford to buy it from my daily job salary, which is for living (children, home, food, fuel bills, etc.) So as you can see – I cannot do that!

            And why get rid of a thing which never let me down, was reliable, small and good in all conditions on the road… Just becasue they changed the FW800 into Thunderbolt?

          • Don’t get rid of it.

            So you carry a power adapter. That’s the deal. I think it’s worth it for the newer, faster machine. (I have one, too, and I’m also on a limited budget for this sort of accessory.)

          • Well, my point was not so much about absolute numbers, but rather about the relative cost of an audio interface compared to the MacBook, and I still stand by that point. I do understand that not everyone (and this obviously includes you, since you offered to post your income situation here) can easily afford all sorts of computers, instruments, accessories and other tools. That is an unfortunate situation, effectively rendering the urban legend about “with modern technology, music making is available to everybody” inappropriate for my taste.

            But at the end of the day, technology is moving on, and that is a good thing in my book. It allows for more convenient options, more environmentally friendly options, better performance, smaller weight and size footprint… the list goes on, depending on the device and the use case.

            However, the availability of new hardware options does not at all render existing hardware useless, does it? As you write yourself: You could happily continue using a 2008 MBP with that 2008 FW audio interface and still be able to write, record and produce the most wonderful music. Now, when you plan to upgrade one part of that equasion (the MBP), you need to consider the consequences – and in this case, one consequence would be that your investment would not only include the MBP itself, but also any other equipment that is dependent on that. It should not have come as a surprise to you, if you had done some research beforehand. And then, it is simply a matter of saving another $200 before you go and purchase the new technical platform – which it effectively is. It is really simple maths. Nothing else.

          • I still don’t understand.

            USB-C is backwards compatible with USB (via adapter).

            Thunderbolt is backwards compatible with FireWire.

            Apple isn’t the only computer vendor.

            There’s no reason you need to buy a new anything. πŸ™‚

  • Grzegorz Bojanek

    Apple constantly introduces new ports cause their stupid policy is to earn loads of money on adapters. That is what happens for years… I really like the first Intel MacBooks (white and black). I have the 2008 MacBook white and it is really reliable with Snow Leopard. (actually I am using it now as I write this). I changed the HDD to 500 GB and RAM to 4GB and I can still use it on stage with smaller setups. What is more I can easily use it with Gleetchlab or Forester. And of course it has all ports which are essential. I have the 2014 MacBook Pro 13″ with i7 for music, but I still use the old machine easily.

    • USB-C is a PC standard with backing from vendors apart from just Apple.

    • foljs

      “””Apple constantly introduces new ports cause their stupid policy is to earn loads of money on adapters. “””

      Actually I very much doubt that adapters amount to anything to even like 1/200 of their revenue.

      They are just expensive because they are built to classic Apple standards (see breakdowns of cheapo chinese and apple adaptors and cables in review sites), and not enough people buy them to bring the price that much down — plus they have the Apple 40% profit margin on top.

      • Grzegorz Bojanek

        So why change good ports to something new? You know, I have an old FA-66 Interface, and it is powered with FireWire 400. I can use it with my old MacBook – no problem, I can use it with the MacBooks which have FW800 – this FW800 still powers the Interface through the cable. Now I have a new MacBook Pro only with Thunderbolt – I had to buy the adapter which changes Thunderbolt into FW800 + a cable FW800 – FW400. And Thunderbolt adapter does not power the Interface, so I have to use the external AC/DC adapter to power the Interface. Big loss on the mobile setup which is essential for me and my gigs…

        You know – they probably do not earn much, but I think that most people will still buy the adapters from Apple, and I think that the sellers will immediately encourage the customers to buy one – cause what can you do with that new USB C when nothing supports it?

        • USB-C is the new standard on the PC side. The “why change” answer is – faster bandwidth. It’s just not there yet.

          Thunderbolt – there, we can answer that more easily. Performance is already better with Thunderbolt than with even FW800. You can add more devices to the chain, and even with just one device, we’re seeing more consistent low-latency performance.

          • Grzegorz Bojanek

            Of course, but still – all those changes tell me that I need to change my old Edirol FA-66, which is still good for me, reliable (was with me on many long trips, tours, etc). Do I really need to change a good interface, because I have a new Thunderbolt? I think NO! As I say – it still works quite well, but the adapter Thunderbolt-FW800 does not transfer power to the interface, and I need to plug (and take on tour) the additional AD/DC adapter, which takes space in my small hand luggage where I have all my instruments and DIY stuff. So all those rapid changes are not very good for me as a user who is not so rich, that can buy a new interface with the new MacBook Pro.

          • Well, I would say: If you can afford a new $1500-2000 MacBook Pro, you could also afford a new $100-200 audio interface with USB that would be bus-powered and with at least the same audio quality and I/O specs as your 7-year-old FW audio interface…

            http://www.thomann.de/gb/search.html?filter=true&gk=coaius&feature-9961=true

          • Grzegorz Bojanek

            No I can’t man! (Maybe I shouldn’t say anything about the reality of salaries in Eastern Europe, but just to open your eyes: After 17 years of work I earn half of money that a person starting the same job I do, but in Germany, and in fact being an intern for 2 years – After 17 years I get about 550 EUR, and the person starting the same job in Germany gets about 1100 EUR). You know – I collected money for a very long time to get the new machine, and the money comes from my music sales, gigs, cause I cannot afford to buy it from my daily job salary, which is for living (children, home, food, fuel bills, etc.) So as you can see – I cannot do that!

            And why get rid of a thing which never let me down, was reliable, small and good in all conditions on the road… Just becasue they changed the FW800 into Thunderbolt?

          • Don’t get rid of it.

            So you carry a power adapter. That’s the deal. I think it’s worth it for the newer, faster machine. (I have one, too, and I’m also on a limited budget for this sort of accessory.)

          • Well, my point was not so much about absolute numbers, but rather about the relative cost of an audio interface compared to the MacBook, and I still stand by that point. I do understand that not everyone (and this obviously includes you, since you offered to post your income situation here) can easily afford all sorts of computers, instruments, accessories and other tools. That is an unfortunate situation, effectively rendering the urban legend about “with modern technology, music making is available to everybody” inappropriate for my taste.

            But at the end of the day, technology is moving on, and that is a good thing in my book. It allows for more convenient options, more environmentally friendly options, better performance, smaller weight and size footprint… the list goes on, depending on the device and the use case.

            However, the availability of new hardware options does not at all render existing hardware useless, does it? As you write yourself: You could happily continue using a 2008 MBP with that 2008 FW audio interface and still be able to write, record and produce the most wonderful music. Now, when you plan to upgrade one part of that equasion (the MBP), you need to consider the consequences – and in this case, one consequence would be that your investment would not only include the MBP itself, but also any other equipment that is dependent on that. It should not have come as a surprise to you, if you had done some research beforehand. And then, it is simply a matter of saving another $200 before you go and purchase the new technical platform – which it effectively is. It is really simple maths. Nothing else.

          • I still don’t understand.

            USB-C is backwards compatible with USB (via adapter).

            Thunderbolt is backwards compatible with FireWire.

            Apple isn’t the only computer vendor.

            There’s no reason you need to buy a new anything. πŸ™‚

  • Grzegorz Bojanek

    Apple constantly introduces new ports cause their stupid policy is to earn loads of money on adapters. That is what happens for years… I really like the first Intel MacBooks (white and black). I have the 2008 MacBook white and it is really reliable with Snow Leopard. (actually I am using it now as I write this). I changed the HDD to 500 GB and RAM to 4GB and I can still use it on stage with smaller setups. What is more I can easily use it with Gleetchlab or Forester. And of course it has all ports which are essential. I have the 2014 MacBook Pro 13″ with i7 for music, but I still use the old machine easily.

    • USB-C is a PC standard with backing from vendors apart from just Apple.

    • foljs

      “””Apple constantly introduces new ports cause their stupid policy is to earn loads of money on adapters. “””

      Actually I very much doubt that adapters amount to anything to even like 1/200 of their revenue.

      They are just expensive because they are built to classic Apple standards (see breakdowns of cheapo chinese and apple adaptors and cables in review sites), and not enough people buy them to bring the price that much down — plus they have the Apple 40% profit margin on top.

      • Grzegorz Bojanek

        So why change good ports to something new? You know, I have an old FA-66 Interface, and it is powered with FireWire 400. I can use it with my old MacBook – no problem, I can use it with the MacBooks which have FW800 – this FW800 still powers the Interface through the cable. Now I have a new MacBook Pro only with Thunderbolt – I had to buy the adapter which changes Thunderbolt into FW800 + a cable FW800 – FW400. And Thunderbolt adapter does not power the Interface, so I have to use the external AC/DC adapter to power the Interface. Big loss on the mobile setup which is essential for me and my gigs…

        You know – they probably do not earn much, but I think that most people will still buy the adapters from Apple, and I think that the sellers will immediately encourage the customers to buy one – cause what can you do with that new USB C when nothing supports it?

        • USB-C is the new standard on the PC side. The “why change” answer is – faster bandwidth. It’s just not there yet.

          Thunderbolt – there, we can answer that more easily. Performance is already better with Thunderbolt than with even FW800. You can add more devices to the chain, and even with just one device, we’re seeing more consistent low-latency performance.

          • Grzegorz Bojanek

            Of course, but still – all those changes tell me that I need to change my old Edirol FA-66, which is still good for me, reliable (was with me on many long trips, tours, etc). Do I really need to change a good interface, because I have a new Thunderbolt? I think NO! As I say – it still works quite well, but the adapter Thunderbolt-FW800 does not transfer power to the interface, and I need to plug (and take on tour) the additional AD/DC adapter, which takes space in my small hand luggage where I have all my instruments and DIY stuff. So all those rapid changes are not very good for me as a user who is not so rich, that can buy a new interface with the new MacBook Pro.

          • Well, I would say: If you can afford a new $1500-2000 MacBook Pro, you could also afford a new $100-200 audio interface with USB that would be bus-powered and with at least the same audio quality and I/O specs as your 7-year-old FW audio interface…

            http://www.thomann.de/gb/search.html?filter=true&gk=coaius&feature-9961=true

          • Grzegorz Bojanek

            No I can’t man! (Maybe I shouldn’t say anything about the reality of salaries in Eastern Europe, but just to open your eyes: After 17 years of work I earn half of money that a person starting the same job I do, but in Germany, and in fact being an intern for 2 years – After 17 years I get about 550 EUR, and the person starting the same job in Germany gets about 1100 EUR). You know – I collected money for a very long time to get the new machine, and the money comes from my music sales, gigs, cause I cannot afford to buy it from my daily job salary, which is for living (children, home, food, fuel bills, etc.) So as you can see – I cannot do that!

            And why get rid of a thing which never let me down, was reliable, small and good in all conditions on the road… Just becasue they changed the FW800 into Thunderbolt?

          • Don’t get rid of it.

            So you carry a power adapter. That’s the deal. I think it’s worth it for the newer, faster machine. (I have one, too, and I’m also on a limited budget for this sort of accessory.)

          • Well, my point was not so much about absolute numbers, but rather about the relative cost of an audio interface compared to the MacBook, and I still stand by that point. I do understand that not everyone (and this obviously includes you, since you offered to post your income situation here) can easily afford all sorts of computers, instruments, accessories and other tools. That is an unfortunate situation, effectively rendering the urban legend about “with modern technology, music making is available to everybody” inappropriate for my taste.

            But at the end of the day, technology is moving on, and that is a good thing in my book. It allows for more convenient options, more environmentally friendly options, better performance, smaller weight and size footprint… the list goes on, depending on the device and the use case.

            However, the availability of new hardware options does not at all render existing hardware useless, does it? As you write yourself: You could happily continue using a 2008 MBP with that 2008 FW audio interface and still be able to write, record and produce the most wonderful music. Now, when you plan to upgrade one part of that equasion (the MBP), you need to consider the consequences – and in this case, one consequence would be that your investment would not only include the MBP itself, but also any other equipment that is dependent on that. It should not have come as a surprise to you, if you had done some research beforehand. And then, it is simply a matter of saving another $200 before you go and purchase the new technical platform – which it effectively is. It is really simple maths. Nothing else.

          • I still don’t understand.

            USB-C is backwards compatible with USB (via adapter).

            Thunderbolt is backwards compatible with FireWire.

            Apple isn’t the only computer vendor.

            There’s no reason you need to buy a new anything. πŸ™‚

  • My initial reaction to the announcements is to wonder where the Air is going to fit into the future lineup. Apple seems to be going for a wider gap between their pro and consumer line, judging from the current Mini’s dual core downgrade from quad. I hope they keep it around – it’s a great blend of power & portability. Its specs and benchmarks are really competitive with the 13″ Pro, and at one point in the refresh cycle, the Air was more powerful.

    • That’s exactly the interesting question. But maybe they’re selling enough machines to support three tiers for the time being.

      It seems eventually you’ll get Pro and non-Pro MacBook… but the Air is still a reasonable niche.

      The fact that they refreshed Air says to me they’re planning to keep three tiers.

  • My initial reaction to the announcements is to wonder where the Air is going to fit into the future lineup. Apple seems to be going for a wider gap between their pro and consumer line, judging from the current Mini’s dual core downgrade from quad. I hope they keep it around – it’s a great blend of power & portability. Its specs and benchmarks are really competitive with the 13″ Pro, and at one point in the refresh cycle, the Air was more powerful.

    • That’s exactly the interesting question. But maybe they’re selling enough machines to support three tiers for the time being.

      It seems eventually you’ll get Pro and non-Pro MacBook… but the Air is still a reasonable niche.

      The fact that they refreshed Air says to me they’re planning to keep three tiers.

  • My initial reaction to the announcements is to wonder where the Air is going to fit into the future lineup. Apple seems to be going for a wider gap between their pro and consumer line, judging from the current Mini’s dual core downgrade from quad. I hope they keep it around – it’s a great blend of power & portability. Its specs and benchmarks are really competitive with the 13″ Pro, and at one point in the refresh cycle, the Air was more powerful.

    • That’s exactly the interesting question. But maybe they’re selling enough machines to support three tiers for the time being.

      It seems eventually you’ll get Pro and non-Pro MacBook… but the Air is still a reasonable niche.

      The fact that they refreshed Air says to me they’re planning to keep three tiers.

  • matthew

    Friends, a little bit of a different subject (yet still related…), I’m getting an iMac shortly for studio production…what are your thoughts on:
    1) waiting for the new iMacs?
    2) overall requirements for a studio iMac (speed, memory, etc.)

    • Matt

      matthew, I got an older refurbished iMac about 2 years ago strictly for my home studio. I saved a TON of money. The new retina displays (I do not have) are fantastic for arranging and production work. What I wish I would have done was gotten the faster processor, either the faster i5 (3.4GHz I believe) or the faster i7’s. I run a lot of plugins and as you probably already know, they are very CPU intensive. One of the first things I did was upgraded my standard 4Gb of RAM to 16Gb–it made a world of difference. So in my experience (depending on the type of recording you plan on, live or digital), processing power is of the utmost importance…..as well as storage. And you can never have enough inputs!!!

      • Refurb or open box / closeout is always the best answer. Never pay full price, if you can avoid it. πŸ™‚

  • matthew

    Friends, a little bit of a different subject (yet still related…), I’m getting an iMac shortly for studio production…what are your thoughts on:
    1) waiting for the new iMacs?
    2) overall requirements for a studio iMac (speed, memory, etc.)

    • Matt

      matthew, I got an older refurbished iMac about 2 years ago strictly for my home studio. I saved a TON of money. The new retina displays (I do not have) are fantastic for arranging and production work. What I wish I would have done was gotten the faster processor, either the faster i5 (3.4GHz I believe) or the faster i7’s. I run a lot of plugins and as you probably already know, they are very CPU intensive. One of the first things I did was upgraded my standard 4Gb of RAM to 16Gb–it made a world of difference. So in my experience (depending on the type of recording you plan on, live or digital), processing power is of the utmost importance…..as well as storage. And you can never have enough inputs!!!

      • Refurb or open box / closeout is always the best answer. Never pay full price, if you can avoid it. πŸ™‚

  • matthew

    Friends, a little bit of a different subject (yet still related…), I’m getting an iMac shortly for studio production…what are your thoughts on:
    1) waiting for the new iMacs?
    2) overall requirements for a studio iMac (speed, memory, etc.)

    • Matt

      matthew, I got an older refurbished iMac about 2 years ago strictly for my home studio. I saved a TON of money. The new retina displays (I do not have) are fantastic for arranging and production work. What I wish I would have done was gotten the faster processor, either the faster i5 (3.4GHz I believe) or the faster i7’s. I run a lot of plugins and as you probably already know, they are very CPU intensive. One of the first things I did was upgraded my standard 4Gb of RAM to 16Gb–it made a world of difference. So in my experience (depending on the type of recording you plan on, live or digital), processing power is of the utmost importance…..as well as storage. And you can never have enough inputs!!!

      • Refurb or open box / closeout is always the best answer. Never pay full price, if you can avoid it. πŸ™‚

  • Matt Jackson

    Ok Peter, I’m going to call you out on not mentioning the new touch pad… (in the voice of P. Kirn)
    It’s a pressure sensitive, force feedback system. Could that mean velocity taping on the pad and getting a nice tap back? Who knows?, but one thing is sure, it’s a step in the right direction for music making hardware. Yes, noticed, I said hardware. That’s because this technology (while probably not multi point pressure sensitive) is in use in the likes of the Linnstrument and Soundplane. And force feedback… of course that’s a good thing. Or is it?

    Ok Jokes aside,
    All I want for Christmas is a new 15″ macbook pro with more than 1TB internal storage… and make it under $2500 and without the, “it’s the culmination of the latest technology in every discipline. Every Atom in the new Macbook Pro was realigned to bring you the epitome of engineering and minimal design. We put in more less…. and now you can have less for more.” – spiel.

    • Yes, it looks cool. But it’s too soon to mention, as nothing supports it yet. πŸ™‚

      I’d really like to see a Magic Trackpad that did that, plus some developer documentation.

  • Matt Jackson

    Ok Peter, I’m going to call you out on not mentioning the new touch pad… (in the voice of P. Kirn)
    It’s a pressure sensitive, force feedback system. Could that mean velocity taping on the pad and getting a nice tap back? Who knows?, but one thing is sure, it’s a step in the right direction for music making hardware. Yes, noticed, I said hardware. That’s because this technology (while probably not multi point pressure sensitive) is in use in the likes of the Linnstrument and Soundplane. And force feedback… of course that’s a good thing. Or is it?

    Ok Jokes aside,
    All I want for Christmas is a new 15″ macbook pro with more than 1TB internal storage… and make it under $2500 and without the, “it’s the culmination of the latest technology in every discipline. Every Atom in the new Macbook Pro was realigned to bring you the epitome of engineering and minimal design. We put in more less…. and now you can have less for more.” – spiel.

    • Yes, it looks cool. But it’s too soon to mention, as nothing supports it yet. πŸ™‚

      I’d really like to see a Magic Trackpad that did that, plus some developer documentation.

  • Matt Jackson

    Ok Peter, I’m going to call you out on not mentioning the new touch pad… (in the voice of P. Kirn)
    It’s a pressure sensitive, force feedback system. Could that mean velocity taping on the pad and getting a nice tap back? Who knows?, but one thing is sure, it’s a step in the right direction for music making hardware. Yes, noticed, I said hardware. That’s because this technology (while probably not multi point pressure sensitive) is in use in the likes of the Linnstrument and Soundplane. And force feedback… of course that’s a good thing. Or is it?

    Ok Jokes aside,
    All I want for Christmas is a new 15″ macbook pro with more than 1TB internal storage… and make it under $2500 and without the, “it’s the culmination of the latest technology in every discipline. Every Atom in the new Macbook Pro was realigned to bring you the epitome of engineering and minimal design. We put in more less…. and now you can have less for more.” – spiel.

    • Yes, it looks cool. But it’s too soon to mention, as nothing supports it yet. πŸ™‚

      I’d really like to see a Magic Trackpad that did that, plus some developer documentation.

  • Norma Sesser

    I have an Apple Air. If you travel between places a lot, then you should get an Air, because it’s extremely light. However, if you prefer raw power over portability, get the Pro. reviews essay writing service

  • CatKX

    If USB-C could utilize thunderbolt, I would want this computer.
    Without it, it’s essentially just a Rolls Royce Chromebook.