vogel

Bitwig Studio turns one year old this week, and they’re keen to use the occasion to convince you to try their software. But the pitch takes a different angle, focusing more than ever on the particular bundle of instruments and effects. There’s an artist pack by Cristian Vogel that makes it clear what’s possible (hello, granular) — and, ending on the 7th of April, deals on U-he instruments to sweeten the pot.

For soft synth lovers, it might be a haul of Easter candy that convinces you to bite.

We’ve already talked about my affection for Cristian Vogel: he’s an artist with a uniquely expressive sonic character, manifested in thumbprints on all his musical output.

And in a new creation for Bitwig Studio, he confirms some of my suspicions of the best potential of that software. When Bitwig Studio came out, many looked to it to be some sort of new direction for DAWs, in particular relative to Ableton Live, which it closely resembles. But the software, for now, doesn’t differ so much from other tools on the market.

Where Bitwig seems to come into its own is with its instruments and effects. If you’re looking for a bundle of new sounds wrapped inside its particular production workflow, in other words, it begins to come into its own.

In Vogel’s capable hands, that’s what you hear – granular and other effects producing a particular digital sound, like the white-pebble ice storms we’ve been seeing in Berlin the last few days. Watch:

Here’s what he writes about his contribution:

I mostly like the way that it’s a kind of modular effects rack with a lot more possibilities than first meets the eye. Actually, if you’re into making patches or modular synths, then you’ll get it straight away. You can wrap elements inside of other elements and control many parameters with just one turn. Really, you can imagine and invent all sorts of things… pretty wild combinations.

So after a few late nights of patching stuff up using only the built-in FX modules and some samples from my own archives, of course, I started to come up with unique inventions: like a kind of Bitwig-only-style crazy granulator. It chops up samples into little grains which turn into long clouds that rain down into a quantized dust and gets frozen into rainbow icicles … sort of thing.

0324_Wavoloid_06

0324_DeviceChain_06

0324_DeepFreeze_06

But Bitwig really want you to buy Bitwig Studio. And this week’s deal is pretty stellar, if you’re interested: you get u-he’s amazing ACE or Bazille free when you buy Studio this week.

Already own Bitwig Studio? There’s a US$50 gift voucher for you toward the purchase of any u-he plugin if you’re an existing user.

More on that developer:
http://www.u-he.com/

Cristian Vogel artist pack:
http://www.bitwig.com/en/community/artist.html

And details on the plug-in deals and 1 year anniversary:
http://www.bitwig.com/en/bitwig_1year.html

Are you using Bitwig Studio? Care to share impressions or tips? Let us know in comments.

  • I liked it on release, especially the effects machinery (cite: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun14/articles/bitwig.htm) but need to get back to it. Still waiting for that modular environment, though…

  • I liked it on release, especially the effects machinery (cite: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun14/articles/bitwig.htm) but need to get back to it. Still waiting for that modular environment, though…

  • I liked it on release, especially the effects machinery (cite: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun14/articles/bitwig.htm) but need to get back to it. Still waiting for that modular environment, though…

  • Gesslr Gesslr

    Bitwig Studio is a pretty amazing piece of kit. The updates since release have been fantastic and the forthcoming 1.2 release looks to be pretty awesome.

  • Gesslr Gesslr

    Bitwig Studio is a pretty amazing piece of kit. The updates since release have been fantastic and the forthcoming 1.2 release looks to be pretty awesome.

  • Bitwig Studio is a pretty amazing piece of kit. The updates since release have been fantastic and the forthcoming 1.2 release looks to be pretty awesome.

  • WXLF

    The people over at Bitwig have something really great on their hands. I can’t wait to see where it goes in the future. I am very impressed with the quality of the in house devices. When they unlock the modular environment, the possibilities will be endless! Also looking forward to the Online Collaboration feature.

  • WXLF

    The people over at Bitwig have something really great on their hands. I can’t wait to see where it goes in the future. I am very impressed with the quality of the in house devices. When they unlock the modular environment, the possibilities will be endless! Also looking forward to the Online Collaboration feature.

  • WXLF

    The people over at Bitwig have something really great on their hands. I can’t wait to see where it goes in the future. I am very impressed with the quality of the in house devices. When they unlock the modular environment, the possibilities will be endless! Also looking forward to the Online Collaboration feature.

  • Dave Phillips

    Hey Peter, Dave Phillips here. I’ve been using/testing BWS for a year. You know where I stand re: FLOSS, but I gotta say I love Bitwig. It’s got real depth, I discover new things to do with it almost every day. Currently it gets equal time with Ardour here at Studio D. The U-he stuff is likewise amazing. Some nice things are happening for the commercial facet of Linux audio.

    • Hi Dave – ah, interesting to hear! And your opinion matters a lot to me, for sure.

      I’m still looking forward to the modular portion – that could really change the story here.

  • Dave Phillips

    Hey Peter, Dave Phillips here. I’ve been using/testing BWS for a year. You know where I stand re: FLOSS, but I gotta say I love Bitwig. It’s got real depth, I discover new things to do with it almost every day. Currently it gets equal time with Ardour here at Studio D. The U-he stuff is likewise amazing. Some nice things are happening for the commercial facet of Linux audio.

    • Hi Dave – ah, interesting to hear! And your opinion matters a lot to me, for sure.

      I’m still looking forward to the modular portion – that could really change the story here.

  • Dave Phillips

    Hey Peter, Dave Phillips here. I’ve been using/testing BWS for a year. You know where I stand re: FLOSS, but I gotta say I love Bitwig. It’s got real depth, I discover new things to do with it almost every day. Currently it gets equal time with Ardour here at Studio D. The U-he stuff is likewise amazing. Some nice things are happening for the commercial facet of Linux audio.

    • Hi Dave – ah, interesting to hear! And your opinion matters a lot to me, for sure.

      I’m still looking forward to the modular portion – that could really change the story here.

  • disqus_tiPt3pRYYa

    Look, anybody who is a professional who quickly uses bitwig will find it incredibly intuitive and capable of professional results. However, a lot of small things still aren’t there. They have a bright future as a DAW company, but currently they are still on catch up imo.. No FET analyzer, warping algorithms still needing imrpovement, new ways to do things doesn’t mean we don’t like the traditional, example, multi band compression, I want a typical multi band compressor I don’t want to create my own. bad min/max value macro system, unable to adjust track height, and last but not least an incredibly bad browser.

  • OlleyOllet

    Look, anybody who is a professional who quickly uses bitwig will find it incredibly intuitive and capable of professional results. However, a lot of small things still aren’t there. They have a bright future as a DAW company, but currently they are still on catch up imo.. No FET analyzer, warping algorithms still needing imrpovement, new ways to do things doesn’t mean we don’t like the traditional, example, multi band compression, I want a typical multi band compressor I don’t want to create my own. bad min/max value macro system, unable to adjust track height, and last but not least an incredibly bad browser.

  • OlleyOllet

    Look, anybody who is a professional who quickly uses bitwig will find it incredibly intuitive and capable of professional results. However, a lot of small things still aren’t there. They have a bright future as a DAW company, but currently they are still on catch up imo.. No FET analyzer, warping algorithms still needing imrpovement, new ways to do things doesn’t mean we don’t like the traditional, example, multi band compression, I want a typical multi band compressor I don’t want to create my own. bad min/max value macro system, unable to adjust track height, and last but not least an incredibly bad browser.

  • twumpy

    I switched over from Ableton to Bitwig about two months ago. I have to say that it’s been really intuitive, although Ableton unsurprisingly has some features that I used which are missing from Bitwig still. It’s been a dream of mine to switch over to Linux for years, mainly for ideological reasons, and Bitwig gave me the possibility to do so. The things in Bitwig I love so far are: controller scripting and LFO & routing possibilities without forking additional couple hundreds for M4L. The midi clock also seems to act more accurately than it did with my experiences with Ableton.

  • twumpy

    I switched over from Ableton to Bitwig about two months ago. I have to say that it’s been really intuitive, although Ableton unsurprisingly has some features that I used which are missing from Bitwig still. It’s been a dream of mine to switch over to Linux for years, mainly for ideological reasons, and Bitwig gave me the possibility to do so. The things in Bitwig I love so far are: controller scripting and LFO & routing possibilities without forking additional couple hundreds for M4L. The midi clock also seems to act more accurately than it did with my experiences with Ableton.

  • twumpy

    I switched over from Ableton to Bitwig about two months ago. I have to say that it’s been really intuitive, although Ableton unsurprisingly has some features that I used which are missing from Bitwig still. It’s been a dream of mine to switch over to Linux for years, mainly for ideological reasons, and Bitwig gave me the possibility to do so. The things in Bitwig I love so far are: controller scripting and LFO & routing possibilities without forking additional couple hundreds for M4L. The midi clock also seems to act more accurately than it did with my experiences with Ableton.

  • Foosnark

    Hmm, while I’m a confirmed disciple of Maschine as standalone DAW, I may have to finally give Bitwig a try. It’s been on my “to do, someday” list for a while now.

    • Foosnark

      …and that’s a big NOPE.

      I don’t find it at all intuitive. There is apparently no quick start guide or tutorial or anything. Between a tutorial on a website and some random poking around I’ve found it’s just not for me. It is not clicking.

      One of the things I really appreciated about Maschine is that about half an hour with the included quick start guide, in a “your first project” format, introduced me to things enough that I could figure everything else out. Going through the full guide introduced me to almost every feature in the software, in a logical way that matches how you’d actually do things in regular use. I thought it was a triumph both of UI design and of documentation.

      I’m sure Bitwig’s powerful once you get to know it, but if I have to spend a week or more figuring out how to do things I can already do in two other hosts, it’s not worth it.

      • foljs

        “””but if I have to spend a week or more figuring out how to do things I can already do in two other hosts, it’s not worth it.”””

        Yeah, god forbid if we spend “a week” to learn a new tool…

      • KarlPopper

        Since your posts are 2 hours apart, I’ll assume you spent less time than that with BWS. You might want relax with it a bit longer and see if you discover something. It took me months before I realized how Reaper was the ultimate DAW for me. Its not easy to fold all that functionality into any software of this type so you kind of have to bear with the developers for a bit as you familiarize yourself with the various features and UI elements.

        • Foosnark

          I’ve found with other DAWs (such as Live) that initial confusion seems to be a pretty good indicator that more time spent learning it only tells me that I don’t like the workflow.

          I don’t really have any motive for changing DAWs anyway, I was just curious about Bitwig since it was new.

  • Foosnark

    Hmm, while I’m a confirmed disciple of Maschine as standalone DAW, I may have to finally give Bitwig a try. It’s been on my “to do, someday” list for a while now.

    • Foosnark

      …and that’s a big NOPE.

      I don’t find it at all intuitive. There is apparently no quick start guide or tutorial or anything. Between a tutorial on a website and some random poking around I’ve found it’s just not for me. It is not clicking.

      One of the things I really appreciated about Maschine is that about half an hour with the included quick start guide, in a “your first project” format, introduced me to things enough that I could figure everything else out. Going through the full guide introduced me to almost every feature in the software, in a logical way that matches how you’d actually do things in regular use. I thought it was a triumph both of UI design and of documentation.

      I’m sure Bitwig’s powerful once you get to know it, but if I have to spend a week or more figuring out how to do things I can already do in two other hosts, it’s not worth it.

      • foljs

        “””but if I have to spend a week or more figuring out how to do things I can already do in two other hosts, it’s not worth it.”””

        Yeah, god forbid if we spend “a week” to learn a new tool…

      • KarlPopper

        Since your posts are 2 hours apart, I’ll assume you spent less time than that with BWS. You might want relax with it a bit longer and see if you discover something. It took me months before I realized how Reaper was the ultimate DAW for me. Its not easy to fold all that functionality into any software of this type so you kind of have to bear with the developers for a bit as you familiarize yourself with the various features and UI elements.

        • Foosnark

          I’ve found with other DAWs (such as Live) that initial confusion seems to be a pretty good indicator that more time spent learning it only tells me that I don’t like the workflow.

          I don’t really have any motive for changing DAWs anyway, I was just curious about Bitwig since it was new.

  • Foosnark

    Hmm, while I’m a confirmed disciple of Maschine as standalone DAW, I may have to finally give Bitwig a try. It’s been on my “to do, someday” list for a while now.

    • Foosnark

      …and that’s a big NOPE.

      I don’t find it at all intuitive. There is apparently no quick start guide or tutorial or anything. Between a tutorial on a website and some random poking around I’ve found it’s just not for me. It is not clicking.

      One of the things I really appreciated about Maschine is that about half an hour with the included quick start guide, in a “your first project” format, introduced me to things enough that I could figure everything else out. Going through the full guide introduced me to almost every feature in the software, in a logical way that matches how you’d actually do things in regular use. I thought it was a triumph both of UI design and of documentation.

      I’m sure Bitwig’s powerful once you get to know it, but if I have to spend a week or more figuring out how to do things I can already do in two other hosts, it’s not worth it.

      • foljs

        “””but if I have to spend a week or more figuring out how to do things I can already do in two other hosts, it’s not worth it.”””

        Yeah, god forbid if we spend “a week” to learn a new tool…

      • KarlPopper

        Since your posts are 2 hours apart, I’ll assume you spent less time than that with BWS. You might want relax with it a bit longer and see if you discover something. It took me months before I realized how Reaper was the ultimate DAW for me. Its not easy to fold all that functionality into any software of this type so you kind of have to bear with the developers for a bit as you familiarize yourself with the various features and UI elements.

        • Foosnark

          I’ve found with other DAWs (such as Live) that initial confusion seems to be a pretty good indicator that more time spent learning it only tells me that I don’t like the workflow.

          I don’t really have any motive for changing DAWs anyway, I was just curious about Bitwig since it was new.

  • DPrty

    I tried it. For me its not there yet. I will keep an eye on it and maybe in 6 years.

  • DPrty

    I tried it. For me its not there yet. I will keep an eye on it and maybe in 6 years.

  • DPrty

    I tried it. For me its not there yet. I will keep an eye on it and maybe in 6 years.

  • Priest

    I find it fast in some areas but really inconsistent and overcomplicated in others. When you start putting devices inside devices it get’s really confusing. But it has some good things, like the modulation. Anyway, nothing that justifies the switch for me.

  • Priest

    I find it fast in some areas but really inconsistent and overcomplicated in others. When you start putting devices inside devices it get’s really confusing. But it has some good things, like the modulation. Anyway, nothing that justifies the switch for me.

  • Priest

    I find it fast in some areas but really inconsistent and overcomplicated in others. When you start putting devices inside devices it get’s really confusing. But it has some good things, like the modulation. Anyway, nothing that justifies the switch for me.

  • Ariel

    Bitwig is still in beta, not ready for professional productions

  • Ariel

    Bitwig is still in beta, not ready for professional productions

  • Ariel

    Bitwig is still in beta, not ready for professional productions