ehtop

Electro-Harmonix have a new looper out, introduced last week in Nashville, that I suspect could be a really big hit. The winners: dual stereo operation, loads of recording space, and then easy connection via USB so a looped improv today could be the beginning of a track tomorrow. Oh, and it’s not expensive, either.

When it comes to looping in live performance, most folks haven’t taken to the computer as much as the standalone looper, particularly BOSS’ LoopStation line. And that’s with good reason: you want dead-simple operation so you can focus on playing.

The heart of the idea is giving you access to two loops. And their implementation couldn’t be simpler. There are two footswitches, one for each loop, so you can record, play back, or overdub on each loop with your foot – tap once to start, tap twice to stop.

You can use those individually or link them together, with separate mix controls for each.

Around that, there’s a lot more power if you want it:

  • Up to 100 individual loops, selected by knob.
  • Up to 13 hours record time (because it records to an SDHC, with capacity up to 32GB)
  • “Verse/chorus” switch (what, no “bridge”?)
  • Mic input, gain control
  • Reverse
  • Pitch up/down octave – with dedicated controls if you get their optional foot pedal
  • USB port connects to the computer so you can save your loops
  • Built-in drum patterns (definitely keeping the soloist in mind here, whether practicing or playing)
  • Included power adapter, 8GB SDHC card

ehwithpedal

ehback

There are also different looping modes: in series, in parallel, quantized rhythms, free-form looping, unlimited layering, and the ability to undo.

This being Electro-Harmonix, it’s made in the USA and comes in a metal case.

US list is US$359.97. If you want the additional foot controller, that’s another US$117.15. (Uh… odd pricing there, but okay! I’ll be glad they didn’t set it to $119.99 and buy myself a medium coffee.) That’s running about 270€ street with tax in Europe.

Sound on Sound got a walkthrough. (Ah, as a Kentucky native now living in Europe, something oddly amusing about the British-meets-Southern drawl accent collision in this series.)

I’m not a guitarist, and I kind of want one. This was first mentioned in Germany, but now gets its formal release.

You’ve got a lot of looper choices, including others even from E-H. Their fanciest is the 4-channel 45000 multi-track looping recorder, though I suspect for some dual stereo will be enough. Which looping hardware are you using? Or are you using software? Let us know in comments.

http://www.ehx.com/

  • neurogami

    How does this sync with out devices? I have a Boss RC-20, which is useful for exploring ideas, practicing, and possibly live stuff. However, the lack of any means to sync it with other devices (e.g. using MIDI) makes it awkward to use except by itself.

    The RC-20 is a relatively low-end device, so the lack of features isn’t surprising. However, for all the features on the 22500 I would expect MIDI sync to be there as well.

    • Anthony Vargas

      Im thinking the exact same thing. However, I guess thats what the point on the 45000 is for I guess, but between one of those and the footswitch, youre easily looking at $600

      • Will

        Exactly. This is filling a different slot in their market.

    • That’s a really good point. Unfortunately I think the makers here assume that instrumentalists don’t want to do that. But while that was true a few years ago, these days it’s not uncommon for people that wants something that’s really simple/affordable *and* syncs.

      • Korhan Erel

        Maybe use one channel of one of the stereo loops as a click track to sync Volcas, etc? Would that work? This’d mean one stereo, one mono loop + sync track

    • Ben Heymer

      If you want a very similar product but with MIDI clock sync, check out the Pigtronix Infinity Looper. I use one to add bass guitar, guitar, or to layer up mono synth chords in my MIDI-hardware live jams. It looks like EH built this as a direct competitor and released at a slightly lower price point.

      • neurogami

        I was checking out this list: http://www.looproom.com/looperchart.php. I saw the Pigtronix, quite a nice device.

        But what I realized was that I don’t want a similar product I want a less expensive product with very few features, but among those few is MIDI sync. 🙂

        • McFlymo

          The nice thing about Ableton Live’s built in plug in “Looper” is that it works very similarly to the Boss LoopStation, but you can MIDI-up all the controls, so you can use any MIDI foot pedal / controller. As for Sync, it’ll sync up with your Ableton project’s global tempo, which means you can have Ableton sending out MIDI to external devices (drum machines, synths etc…) and the Looper will fall in line with that clock. You can also make Looper the global tempo control, so that your project syncs up with the tempo you set with the Looper. It’s pretty powerful.

          • neurogami

            Have you done this? My concern with software looping is latency.

            I keep meaning to spend more time exploring SooperLooper and the looping aspects of Reaper..

            I’m not a Live user (tried it, didn’t care for it, much prefer Renoise) and buying Live just for looping is even more expensive then getting a good hardware looper with MIDI sync.

          • McFlymo

            If you’re not into Live, then I’d agree with you: A dedicated hardware looper would be the way to go. Also, while I’ve used the looper and not had latency issues per se, I’ve had “glitchy” interruptions, e.g. pressing a MIDI button to trigger the looper has sometimes caused a subtle, but definitely audible, pop or click in the audio playback. Which is obviously not great.

  • neurogami

    How does this sync with out devices? I have a Boss RC-20, which is useful for exploring ideas, practicing, and possibly live stuff. However, the lack of any means to sync it with other devices (e.g. using MIDI) makes it awkward to use except by itself.

    The RC-20 is a relatively low-end device, so the lack of features isn’t surprising. However, for all the features on the 22500 I would expect MIDI sync to be there as well.

    • Anthony Vargas

      Im thinking the exact same thing. However, I guess thats what the point on the 45000 is for I guess, but between one of those and the footswitch, youre easily looking at $600

      • Will

        Exactly. This is filling a different slot in their market.

    • That’s a really good point. Unfortunately I think the makers here assume that instrumentalists don’t want to do that. But while that was true a few years ago, these days it’s not uncommon for people that wants something that’s really simple/affordable *and* syncs.

      • Korhan Erel

        Maybe use one channel of one of the stereo loops as a click track to sync Volcas, etc? Would that work? This’d mean one stereo, one mono loop + sync track

    • Ben Heymer

      If you want a very similar product but with MIDI clock sync, check out the Pigtronix Infinity Looper. I use one to add bass guitar, guitar, or to layer up mono synth chords in my MIDI-hardware live jams. It looks like EH built this as a direct competitor and released at a slightly lower price point.

      • neurogami

        I was checking out this list: http://www.looproom.com/looperchart.php. I saw the Pigtronix, quite a nice device.

        But what I realized was that I don’t want a similar product I want a less expensive product with very few features, but among those few is MIDI sync. 🙂

        • McFlymo

          The nice thing about Ableton Live’s built in plug in “Looper” is that it works very similarly to the Boss LoopStation, but you can MIDI-up all the controls, so you can use any MIDI foot pedal / controller. As for Sync, it’ll sync up with your Ableton project’s global tempo, which means you can have Ableton sending out MIDI to external devices (drum machines, synths etc…) and the Looper will fall in line with that clock. You can also make Looper the global tempo control, so that your project syncs up with the tempo you set with the Looper. It’s pretty powerful.

          • neurogami

            Have you done this? My concern with software looping is latency.

            I keep meaning to spend more time exploring SooperLooper and the looping aspects of Reaper..

            I’m not a Live user (tried it, didn’t care for it, much prefer Renoise) and buying Live just for looping is even more expensive then getting a good hardware looper with MIDI sync.

          • McFlymo

            If you’re not into Live, then I’d agree with you: A dedicated hardware looper would be the way to go. Also, while I’ve used the looper and not had latency issues per se, I’ve had “glitchy” interruptions, e.g. pressing a MIDI button to trigger the looper has sometimes caused a subtle, but definitely audible, pop or click in the audio playback. Which is obviously not great.

  • neurogami

    How does this sync with out devices? I have a Boss RC-20, which is useful for exploring ideas, practicing, and possibly live stuff. However, the lack of any means to sync it with other devices (e.g. using MIDI) makes it awkward to use except by itself.

    The RC-20 is a relatively low-end device, so the lack of features isn’t surprising. However, for all the features on the 22500 I would expect MIDI sync to be there as well.

    • Anthony Vargas

      Im thinking the exact same thing. However, I guess thats what the point on the 45000 is for I guess, but between one of those and the footswitch, youre easily looking at $600

      • Will

        Exactly. This is filling a different slot in their market.

    • That’s a really good point. Unfortunately I think the makers here assume that instrumentalists don’t want to do that. But while that was true a few years ago, these days it’s not uncommon for people that wants something that’s really simple/affordable *and* syncs.

      • Korhan Erel

        Maybe use one channel of one of the stereo loops as a click track to sync Volcas, etc? Would that work? This’d mean one stereo, one mono loop + sync track

    • Ben Heymer

      If you want a very similar product but with MIDI clock sync, check out the Pigtronix Infinity Looper. I use one to add bass guitar, guitar, or to layer up mono synth chords in my MIDI-hardware live jams. It looks like EH built this as a direct competitor and released at a slightly lower price point.

      • neurogami

        I was checking out this list: http://www.looproom.com/looperchart.php. I saw the Pigtronix, quite a nice device.

        But what I realized was that I don’t want a similar product I want a less expensive product with very few features, but among those few is MIDI sync. 🙂

        • McFlymo

          The nice thing about Ableton Live’s built in plug in “Looper” is that it works very similarly to the Boss LoopStation, but you can MIDI-up all the controls, so you can use any MIDI foot pedal / controller. As for Sync, it’ll sync up with your Ableton project’s global tempo, which means you can have Ableton sending out MIDI to external devices (drum machines, synths etc…) and the Looper will fall in line with that clock. You can also make Looper the global tempo control, so that your project syncs up with the tempo you set with the Looper. It’s pretty powerful.

          • neurogami

            Have you done this? My concern with software looping is latency.

            I keep meaning to spend more time exploring SooperLooper and the looping aspects of Reaper..

            I’m not a Live user (tried it, didn’t care for it, much prefer Renoise) and buying Live just for looping is even more expensive then getting a good hardware looper with MIDI sync.

          • McFlymo

            If you’re not into Live, then I’d agree with you: A dedicated hardware looper would be the way to go. Also, while I’ve used the looper and not had latency issues per se, I’ve had “glitchy” interruptions, e.g. pressing a MIDI button to trigger the looper has sometimes caused a subtle, but definitely audible, pop or click in the audio playback. Which is obviously not great.

  • Drew

    Love the guy trying to nonchalantly rep his product in a way that’s still cool.

    It’s got banks….and undo. Whatever.

    It’s going to available……*shrugs*

    • that’s why we bring Club-Mate (energy tea) to Musikmesse 😉

  • Drew

    Love the guy trying to nonchalantly rep his product in a way that’s still cool.

    It’s got banks….and undo. Whatever.

    It’s going to available……*shrugs*

    • that’s why we bring Club-Mate (energy tea) to Musikmesse 😉

  • Drew

    Love the guy trying to nonchalantly rep his product in a way that’s still cool.

    It’s got banks….and undo. Whatever.

    It’s going to available……*shrugs*

    • that’s why we bring Club-Mate (energy tea) to Musikmesse 😉

  • Will

    I use LoopyHD, a FCB1010 MIDI foot pedal for start/stop/overdub/length type stuff and a little Korg Nanokontrol to adjust volume and effects (via audiobus). 12 loops, independent or relative lengths, overdubbing with decay for frippy ambient wankery, punching, offsetting, reverse, merging… And you can get a zip of the whole !# for expanding or arranging in a DAW afterwards.

    I also have the RC20 and the original Akai Headrush. They get used too but less so these days because Loopy is just so powerful (and simple). I still see the appeal of units like this though—as much as Mike (Loopy dev) has nailed the simplicity:power ratio, it’s never as straightforward as simply plugging into a dedicated pedal and getting on with it.

    A very cool bonus with this unit is that if it’s at the end of your signal chain, it can also serve as a master recorder for jams since you can put any size card in it, it records in stereo and has unlimited ‘loop’ length. A 32gb card should give you 48 hours of recording.

  • Will

    I use LoopyHD, a FCB1010 MIDI foot pedal for start/stop/overdub/length type stuff and a little Korg Nanokontrol to adjust volume and effects (via audiobus). 12 loops, independent or relative lengths, overdubbing with decay for frippy ambient wankery, punching, offsetting, reverse, merging… And you can get a zip of the whole !# for expanding or arranging in a DAW afterwards.

    I also have the RC20 and the original Akai Headrush. They get used too but less so these days because Loopy is just so powerful (and simple). I still see the appeal of units like this though—as much as Mike (Loopy dev) has nailed the simplicity:power ratio, it’s never as straightforward as simply plugging into a dedicated pedal and getting on with it.

    A very cool bonus with this unit is that if it’s at the end of your signal chain, it can also serve as a master recorder for jams since you can put any size card in it, it records in stereo and has unlimited ‘loop’ length. A 32gb card should give you 48 hours of recording.

  • Will

    I use LoopyHD, a FCB1010 MIDI foot pedal for start/stop/overdub/length type stuff and a little Korg Nanokontrol to adjust volume and effects (via audiobus). 12 loops, independent or relative lengths, overdubbing with decay for frippy ambient wankery, punching, offsetting, reverse, merging… And you can get a zip of the whole !# for expanding or arranging in a DAW afterwards.

    I also have the RC20 and the original Akai Headrush. They get used too but less so these days because Loopy is just so powerful (and simple). I still see the appeal of units like this though—as much as Mike (Loopy dev) has nailed the simplicity:power ratio, it’s never as straightforward as simply plugging into a dedicated pedal and getting on with it.

    A very cool bonus with this unit is that if it’s at the end of your signal chain, it can also serve as a master recorder for jams since you can put any size card in it, it records in stereo and has unlimited ‘loop’ length. A 32gb card should give you 48 hours of recording.

  • Nuno Zimas

    I’d get one of these if each overdub layer could be saved as s separate file. Sadly, I’m yet to find a hardware looper with this feature.

  • Nuno Zimas

    I’d get one of these if each overdub layer could be saved as s separate file. Sadly, I’m yet to find a hardware looper with this feature.

  • Nuno Zimas

    I’d get one of these if each overdub layer could be saved as s separate file. Sadly, I’m yet to find a hardware looper with this feature.

  • Jesse Engel

    I started with hardware loopers (Boss Loopstations) and switched to software ~10 years ago (The much underrated MOBIUS (http://www.circularlabs.com/ , sadly it’s been without dev for a year or two, but Jeff is an amazing guy who’s been very responsive and is looking to get back to it by next summer).

    I still use hardware for the convenience of simple setup, but for more elaborate integration, software still wins (unlimited loops, interesting syncing/offset schemes, effects).

    That said, something lacking in both software and hardware is the ability to easily change tempo without changing pitch. This is very helpful for playing with a live band / drummer that naturally meanders in tempo during performance. Live’s audio clips do this nicely, but don’t allow overdubbing etc. Superlooper supposedly can do this but I’ve never got it to work. I eventually put together my own solution using max4live and DiracLE~ ( http://www.maxforlive.com/library/device/1440/timestretch-looper , https://github.com/jesseengel/TimestretchLooper ) which is basically a clone of Live’s looper with timestretching. It’s not up to date for the latest Live though (64 bit) but with Max’s new timestretching built into groove that probably isn’t too hard, just haven’t had time to get around to it.

    Anyone else run into this issue / found a way around it? Hardware or software?

    • Robin Parmar

      Thanks for that. It is always good to see what creative solutions people come up with. When I looked at a looper some years back, it was because I wanted to use it in rather unorthodox ways. I kept being drawn back to software, since the hardware devices are really only designed for guitarists and pop music.

    • Robin Parmar

      In the video it is stated that this looper DOES change tempo without changing pitch. The guy was pretty wiped though, so I’d wait for full specs.

  • Jesse Engel

    I started with hardware loopers (Boss Loopstations) and switched to software ~10 years ago (The much underrated MOBIUS (http://www.circularlabs.com/ , sadly it’s been without dev for a year or two, but Jeff is an amazing guy who’s been very responsive and is looking to get back to it by next summer).

    I still use hardware for the convenience of simple setup, but for more elaborate integration, software still wins (unlimited loops, interesting syncing/offset schemes, effects).

    That said, something lacking in both software and hardware is the ability to easily change tempo without changing pitch. This is very helpful for playing with a live band / drummer that naturally meanders in tempo during performance. Live’s audio clips do this nicely, but don’t allow overdubbing etc. Superlooper supposedly can do this but I’ve never got it to work. I eventually put together my own solution using max4live and DiracLE~ ( http://www.maxforlive.com/library/device/1440/timestretch-looper , https://github.com/jesseengel/TimestretchLooper ) which is basically a clone of Live’s looper with timestretching. It’s not up to date for the latest Live though (64 bit) but with Max’s new timestretching built into groove that probably isn’t too hard, just haven’t had time to get around to it.

    Anyone else run into this issue / found a way around it? Hardware or software?

    • Robin Parmar

      Thanks for that. It is always good to see what creative solutions people come up with. When I looked at a looper some years back, it was because I wanted to use it in rather unorthodox ways. I kept being drawn back to software, since the hardware devices are really only designed for guitarists and pop music.

    • Robin Parmar

      In the video it is stated that this looper DOES change tempo without changing pitch. The guy was pretty wiped though, so I’d wait for full specs.

  • Jesse Engel

    I started with hardware loopers (Boss Loopstations) and switched to software ~10 years ago (The much underrated MOBIUS (http://www.circularlabs.com/ , sadly it’s been without dev for a year or two, but Jeff is an amazing guy who’s been very responsive and is looking to get back to it by next summer).

    I still use hardware for the convenience of simple setup, but for more elaborate integration, software still wins (unlimited loops, interesting syncing/offset schemes, effects).

    That said, something lacking in both software and hardware is the ability to easily change tempo without changing pitch. This is very helpful for playing with a live band / drummer that naturally meanders in tempo during performance. Live’s audio clips do this nicely, but don’t allow overdubbing etc. Superlooper supposedly can do this but I’ve never got it to work. I eventually put together my own solution using max4live and DiracLE~ ( http://www.maxforlive.com/library/device/1440/timestretch-looper , https://github.com/jesseengel/TimestretchLooper ) which is basically a clone of Live’s looper with timestretching. It’s not up to date for the latest Live though (64 bit) but with Max’s new timestretching built into groove that probably isn’t too hard, just haven’t had time to get around to it.

    Anyone else run into this issue / found a way around it? Hardware or software?

    • Thanks for that. It is always good to see what creative solutions people come up with. When I looked at a looper some years back, it was because I wanted to use it in rather unorthodox ways. I kept being drawn back to software, since the hardware devices are really only designed for guitarists and pop music.

    • In the video it is stated that this looper DOES change tempo without changing pitch. The guy was pretty wiped though, so I’d wait for full specs.

  • Robin Parmar

    These guys need a new visual designer, because this is ugly as sin. For a start everything would be more readable if the front panel was the same grey as the rest of the casing. Solid black lettering and knobs would then stand out.

  • Robin Parmar

    These guys need a new visual designer, because this is ugly. For a start everything would be more readable if the front panel was the same grey as the rest of the casing. Solid black lettering and knobs would then stand out. Or some other solution. Think about “the box” outside the box!

  • These guys need a new visual designer, because this is ugly. For a start everything would be more readable if the front panel was the same grey as the rest of the casing. Solid black lettering and knobs would then stand out. Or some other solution. Think about “the box” outside the box!