A guy I went to college with once swore there was a ghost in a practice room, tapping along as he played late one night. Augmenta might make that experience happen all the time.

Call it augmented drumming. An algorithm listens as you play, and adds wild IDM-style glitches and additions and more percussion. Simple patterns become complex – fast.

The work is the research project of CDM reader Alessandro Guerri, who completed it as the thesis for his Electronic Music Bachelor Degree at the Conservatory of Music G. Rossini in Pesaro, Italy. I’m not sure what Maestro Rossini would think, but I think it’s wild. He describes the concept:

Agumenta is a project born to discover the projectual [sic] strategies of an interactive system and the feedback relationship between musician and software.

The concept of an augmented instrument was the starting point of what has became my thesis … timbral and rhythmic features, unachievable by a human activity,could be created and managed by the interaction of the musician with the software.

Agumenta is a continuously- evolving project; its random nature gives a specific musical behaviour to the software and it opens up new possibilities of control ranging from a total randomness to sequential approach.

The system’s features can be applied to all electronic percussion instruments which are able to transmit Midi messages and Audio signal,and to all the acoustic percussions through microphones and triggers.

For more, you can reach Alessandro on Facebook.

  • man

    Eh, not very musical.

  • man

    Eh, not very musical.

  • man

    Eh, not very musical.

  • danoise

    The potential is definitely there, but this particular video didn’t impress me, I would personally like to see the musician engaging more in a “call & response” activity with the computer – you do something, the computer answers. You reply back, and so on. And you would be continuing a great musical tradition at the same time 😀

    • Well, it’s a diploma project — but I think the lesson here is, it’s really important to give a project to someone else to test and develop. That’d be a logical next step.

      • danoise

        The last part of the video is pretty great as Alessandro is repeating the same drum patterns. To me, this makes the whole affair more apparent 😀

  • danoise

    The potential is definitely there, but this particular video didn’t impress me, I would personally like to see the musician engaging more in a “call & response” activity with the computer – you do something, the computer answers. You reply back, and so on. And you would be continuing a great musical tradition at the same time 😀

    • Well, it’s a diploma project — but I think the lesson here is, it’s really important to give a project to someone else to test and develop. That’d be a logical next step.

      • danoise

        The last part of the video is pretty great as Alessandro is repeating the same drum patterns. To me, this makes the whole affair more apparent 😀

  • danoise

    The potential is definitely there, but this particular video didn’t impress me, I would personally like to see the musician engaging more in a “call & response” activity with the computer – you do something, the computer answers. You reply back, and so on. And you would be continuing a great musical tradition at the same time 😀

    • Well, it’s a diploma project — but I think the lesson here is, it’s really important to give a project to someone else to test and develop. That’d be a logical next step.

      • danoise

        The last part of the video is pretty great as Alessandro is repeating the same drum patterns. To me, this makes the whole affair more apparent 😀

  • I think if what you’re going for is an ambient amount of “fiddly chaos” that sounds composed _enough_ to not feel overly static from being stochastic as a general feeling, this sounds pretty good. If I wanted to keep time super uptempo in doing something that was modeled after early Telefon Tel Aviv or BT-style glitch only using a live performance, this would serve that stylistic purpose well.

    Without making a bunch of cues and overly pre-sequencing anything, the output of this has some nice blends of time stretches and modulating rhythmic delays and pitch shifts and stuff… it’s definitely above the level of just sounding like a rudimentary first attempt at “auto-glitch” which is what many Bachelor’s final projects sound like… to my ears, the implementation sounds “lived with” enough to be usable in at least a couple of different performative contexts successfully. Kudos!

    • I was reminded of another project while watching this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKxXJAXFnvg

      An almost comically simple technical implementation of a drum processing idea, just impulses falling below thresholds to make small-buffer buzzes – but man it’s rad. It gets going about 2:00 in.

      • Jyoti Mishra

        That’s awesome, thanks for sharing!

  • I think if what you’re going for is an ambient amount of “fiddly chaos” that sounds composed _enough_ to not feel overly static from being stochastic as a general feeling, this sounds pretty good. If I wanted to keep time super uptempo in doing something that was modeled after early Telefon Tel Aviv or BT-style glitch only using a live performance, this would serve that stylistic purpose well.

    Without making a bunch of cues and overly pre-sequencing anything, the output of this has some nice blends of time stretches and modulating rhythmic delays and pitch shifts and stuff… it’s definitely above the level of just sounding like a rudimentary first attempt at “auto-glitch” which is what many Bachelor’s final projects sound like… to my ears, the implementation sounds “lived with” enough to be usable in at least a couple of different performative contexts successfully. Kudos!

    • I was reminded of another project while watching this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKxXJAXFnvg

      An almost comically simple technical implementation of a drum processing idea, just impulses falling below thresholds to make small-buffer buzzes – but man it’s rad. It gets going about 2:00 in.

      • Jyoti Mishra

        That’s awesome, thanks for sharing!

  • I think if what you’re going for is an ambient amount of “fiddly chaos” that sounds composed _enough_ to not feel overly static from being stochastic as a general feeling, this sounds pretty good. If I wanted to keep time super uptempo in doing something that was modeled after early Telefon Tel Aviv or BT-style glitch only using a live performance, this would serve that stylistic purpose well.

    Without making a bunch of cues and overly pre-sequencing anything, the output of this has some nice blends of time stretches and modulating rhythmic delays and pitch shifts and stuff… it’s definitely above the level of just sounding like a rudimentary first attempt at “auto-glitch” which is what many Bachelor’s final projects sound like… to my ears, the implementation sounds “lived with” enough to be usable in at least a couple of different performative contexts successfully. Kudos!

    • I was reminded of another project while watching this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKxXJAXFnvg

      An almost comically simple technical implementation of a drum processing idea, just impulses falling below thresholds to make small-buffer buzzes – but man it’s rad. It gets going about 2:00 in.

      • Jyoti Mishra

        That’s awesome, thanks for sharing!

  • seppog

    just want to point to Josef Klammer, which might fit into this genre of electronic drumming and went even further, so he won an Award of Distinction at this years prix ars electronica:
    (link with video) http://prix2015.aec.at/prixwinner/15279/

    • Jyoti Mishra

      I loved the joystick bit ~ beautiful!

  • seppog

    just want to point to Josef Klammer, which might fit into this genre of electronic drumming and went even further, so he won an Award of Distinction at this years prix ars electronica:
    (link with video) http://prix2015.aec.at/prixwinner/15279/

    • Jyoti Mishra

      I loved the joystick bit ~ beautiful!

  • seppog

    just want to point to Josef Klammer, which might fit into this genre of electronic drumming and went even further, so he won an Award of Distinction at this years prix ars electronica:
    (link with video) http://prix2015.aec.at/prixwinner/15279/

    • Jyoti Mishra

      I loved the joystick bit ~ beautiful!

  • Polite Society

    I like the idea, but the video sounds pretty much the same as when you put dblue glitch on it’s default setting over a drum track.

    • colq101

      I thought that too although dblue or other plugins rely on a drummer playing at the designated tempo of the host DAW an “algorithm that listens as you play” is what sets this apart, I believe I can detect a new style effect being triggered with each attack without being too tremendously sync oriented. One point to note also is a line in signal from a Vdrums sound module is not the same as tracking off an acoustic kit I would like to see that demo…

  • Polite Society

    I like the idea, but the video sounds pretty much the same as when you put dblue glitch on it’s default setting over a drum track.

    • colq101

      I thought that too although dblue or other plugins rely on a drummer playing at the designated tempo of the host DAW an “algorithm that listens as you play” is what sets this apart, I believe I can detect a new style effect being triggered with each attack without being too tremendously sync oriented. One point to note also is a line in signal from a Vdrums sound module is not the same as tracking off an acoustic kit I would like to see that demo…

  • Polite Society

    I like the idea, but the video sounds pretty much the same as when you put dblue glitch on it’s default setting over a drum track.

    • colq101

      I thought that too although dblue or other plugins rely on a drummer playing at the designated tempo of the host DAW an “algorithm that listens as you play” is what sets this apart, I believe I can detect a new style effect being triggered with each attack without being too tremendously sync oriented. One point to note also is a line in signal from a Vdrums sound module is not the same as tracking off an acoustic kit I would like to see that demo…

  • Anyone know what drum set that is?

  • Anyone know what drum set that is?

  • Anyone know what drum set that is?

  • Dave O Mahony

    Were this to be workable with guitar – my 20 year search would be over! Brilliant idea IMHO!

  • Dave O Mahony

    Were this to be workable with guitar – my 20 year search would be over! Brilliant idea IMHO!

  • Dave O Mahony

    Were this to be workable with guitar – my 20 year search would be over! Brilliant idea IMHO!

  • wetterberg

    Everyone’s posting drummer videos and no one has posted Duracell yet? SHAME! (ding, ding ding) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUqvYKLA0Y0

  • wetterberg

    Everyone’s posting drummer videos and no one has posted Duracell yet? SHAME! (ding, ding ding) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUqvYKLA0Y0

  • wetterberg

    Everyone’s posting drummer videos and no one has posted Duracell yet? SHAME! (ding, ding ding) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUqvYKLA0Y0

  • Jan Gerhard

    is it broken? Sounds like an old hardware sampler with defective sample RAM.

  • Jan Gerhard

    is it broken? Sounds like an old hardware sampler with defective sample RAM.

  • Jan Gerhard

    is it broken? Sounds like an old hardware sampler with defective sample RAM.

  • KS

    not bad, but after 2nd minute – boring..

  • KS

    not bad, but after 2nd minute – boring..

  • KS

    not bad, but after 2nd minute – boring..

  • dkiitty

    +++ drums, lights and electronics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyjGaMLtT1Y

  • dkiitty

    +++ drums, lights and electronics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyjGaMLtT1Y

  • dkiitty

    +++ drums, lights and electronics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyjGaMLtT1Y