femalepressure

Ed.: We’ve seen plenty of headlines about the role of gender equality in arts and technology. But what makes female:pressure unique, as their name implies, is that the organization is working to use the power of crowds to effect real change. CDM looks to its assistant editor and editorial intern Zuzana Friday to tell us more. -PK

Founded in 1998 by Electric Indigo, female:pressure is a network of artists, DJs, musicians, journalists, booking agents, and other professionals in electronic music and digital arts. In those years, the organization has served some important roles:

  • Highlighting the inequalities that dominates the electronic music scene when it comes to gender (and beyond), including compiling their own research and surveys – with some surprising and sad hard numbers.
  • Connecting artists and other music professionals who identify themselves as female within their network. In April 2015, they reached 1450 members from 65 countries. And anyone can join.
  • Organizing illuminating events touching topics of music and gender.
  • Their recent activity includes the Visbility blog, which counters the perception that women aren’t tech-savvy and mostly boys spend time in the studio. On the blog, musicians like Laurel Halo, Cio D’or, and Soap & Skin have contributed photos of themselves in their production environment. Apart from that, female:pressure released a techno compilation a while ago, demonstrating that females not only want to, but also can create pretty badass techno. (Ed.: Read our review of that compilation; we felt these were artists you should know irrespective of the identity politics message.)

    clubsstats

    To support this mission, female:pressure recently launched a crowdfunding campaign, which, in their own words, should help the network “to continue promoting equality on electronic music scene and to improve the awareness of bookers, club owners, labels and artists themselves”. Basically, they wanted added resources to continue doing what they do. Since female:pressure was the first of its kind and inspired many other networks and platforms – including Femmecult and Discowoman – its role in the music ‘biz is invaluable. And with growing popularity and awareness of the network, the very issues they focus on are being discussed more and more. Therefore, supporting them means supporting diversity and equality in a still male-dominated arts field.

    The deadline of the campaign is 24th September and incentives for supporting it include a female:pressure compilation from Different is Different Records, an online course for the Push the Envelope by Sonic Bloom, Max for Cats Complete Collection (with or without the modular Max for Live synth environment OSCiLLOT), a VJ Workshop, and “Ableton Live Expert” – 4-month UPSTART online course. (Ed.: Those are all some highly recommended incentives; the Max for Cats stuff and training here is top-notch. Madeleine Bloom’s Sonic Bloom is simply one of the richest resources for Ableton and Max knowledge online, full stop. And that gives boys and girls a reason to sign up here – I could learn a thing or two, I know.)

    There are a range of activities under the female:pressure umbrella. From their own description, the group’s crowd funding would support programs to:

    • promote female artists

    • keep maintain our database

    • organize meetings, events, panels talk and discussions

    • finance our study, which was done voluntary since 2012

    • hold workshops

    • prepare showcases and concerts

    All the information and direct support can be found in their Startnext website:

    Support female:pressure PERSPECTIVES [startnext crowdfunding]

    Speaking of their activities, female:pressure is going wild this month. On September 10th, they co-hosted a panel discussion together with SoundCloud. The new event series, dubbed #re_presenting, connects a Berlin-based community of musicians and debates under-represented topics in music. This first edition is focused on genre and gender and will be moderated by Annie Goh with five musicians representing a range of music genres including Emika, Sarah Farina, and Gudrun Gut. Demand is high: the event was quickly sold out.

    If you’re not in Berlin – let alone holding tickets to sold-out panels – you can join online as female:pressure takes over Frission Radio. Every two weeks, you can listen to a new show by one of their members; all the past shows can be found on Mixcloud. On September 18th, Leah King will play a live show there.

    Last but not least, female:pressure will also organize a second edition of their PERSPECTIVES Festival this month. It returns to Berlin nightclub about blank where organizers say it “continues to examine the challenges faced by women in a male-dominated scene, explore important gender and music-related issues, and stage showcases of outstanding female DJs, VJs, and live performers.” In contrast to lineups that average 10% female composition (by their statistics), PERSPECTIVES is of course 100% female-identified artists, featuring bold personalities from their network:

    Aschka (ca) ✭ Borusiade (ro) ✭ Clara Moto (at) ✭ Donna Maya (de) ✭ Dorit Chrysler (us) ✭ hiT͟Hərˈto͞o (cz) + aikia (it) ✭ Kaltès (be) ✭ Kate Miller (au) ✭ Magda El Bayoumi (de) ✭ Monya (de) ✭ Perera Elsewhere (uk) ✭ Reka (es) ✭ female:pressure visualpulse ✭ Special Guest tba ✭

    Here’s the extraordinarily active female:pressure SoundCloud group:

    For more info about the festival, go to femalepressure-perspectives.net or
    check out the Facebook event.

    • Dntbwhk

      Sorry but there just not that many good female electronic artists out there. Maybe 5?

      • Kaltès Nfriends

        You are sooo wrong, there is actually 6 but you probably don’t know them all…
        Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz…and…Nina Kravitz.

        • Pablo

          Monika Kruse Gayle San Misstress Barbara Nina Kravitz Ellen Allien Magda Miss Kittin Annie Mac Sandra Collins etc

          • Pablo

            Paris Hilton Nope.

          • DjAlexia Tippell

            There are also many other names that aren’t pushed in mainstream but in the underground scene they can be as equal,if not better then the names mentioned above. Like in any business is also who you know and have that pinch-of-luck so you can be exposed to main stream as well… Sandra was sitting on a bench with other posse at UCI college CA. while I was spinning a set for a radio show. She became the girlfriend of a popular dj (I forgot his name.) He had a super successful night with Doc Martin in OC every Thursday and one night her formerly boyfriend put Sandra as opener for the night train wrecking but yet in a matter of short time she became really successful and mind you learned how to mix…Especially in the Trans communities at time Trans was just like EDM today big crowd. Honestly always loved the underground scene and niche with special clubs sure less lucrative and kept in the “underground” sort of speak but I think … stick with ya Heart the rest will follow…

          • akkamiau

            Pablo, we were just sarcastic 🙂 we could go on… Paula Temple, Jana Sleep, Mary Velo, Electric Indigo, Rebekah, Adriana Lopez, Helena Hauff, rRoxymore, Holy Herndon, Planning to Rock, Peaches…. if you wanna listen my last mix with all female:pressure artists, here:
            https://www.mixcloud.com/akkamiauprivate/fp-indefinitely/

        • DjAlexia Tippell

          Get over yourself… Grow UP!

          • Kaltès Nfriends

            Do we know each other Alexia? I am not sure you have seen my comment was a cynical answer to someone thinking there is only 5 good female artists because all he knows is the mainstream trend and have no knowledge, whatsoever of how rich and diverse the scene truly is.

      • DjAlexia Tippell

        Sure, I study sound engineer and dj over 18 years owned a studio and I mean a RECORDING STUDIO in L.A. and then Rome,Italy. So You might wanna reconsider your mathematical assumption? Suggest to do some research and instead focus on these chicks -showing “twins” or already millionaires celebs, ladies from music bands, ( I did a rmx for Macy Gray 2010 soon after she started computerised-djing.) While you “Guys” are flanging,delaying,stuttering your preset with PC’s and toys that I do like to explore myself and learn the new trend and techniques at time I used 3 turntables to create flange, delay and keep 3 records going while mastering the craft …Using my Craft I worked sweated for spending hours everyday… Salut! 😉

      • Friday

        The problem that you troll like this is that even thought there are plenty of great female producers, DJs and music professionals, they get less recognition because electronic music, as almost every other field of arts, is still male-dominated. Often, female artists are overlooked or ignored, not taken seriously or they have to prove their skills ten times more for one reason – simply ‘cos they aren’t men. female:pressure’s activities raise awareness about these issues and even their own database of artists will prove you’re wrong.

        • Pablo

          No one wants to be DJ these days technology is killing art you buy this thing traktor you count 1234 next press the button congratulations you are DJ

    • Dntbwhk

      Yuptrue

    • Dntbwhk

      Yes I agree!

    • Dntbwhk

      Sorry but there just not that many good female electronic artists out there. Maybe 5?

      • Kaltès Nfriends

        You are sooo wrong, there is actually 6 but you probably don’t know them all…
        Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz, Nina Kravitz…and…Nina Kravitz.

        • Pablo

          Monika Kruse Gayle San Misstress Barbara Nina Kravitz Ellen Allien Magda Miss Kittin Annie Mac Sandra Collins etc

          • Pablo

            Paris Hilton Nope.

          • There are also many other names that aren’t pushed in mainstream but in the underground scene they can be as equal,if not better then the names mentioned above. Like in any business is also who you know and have that pinch-of-luck so you can be exposed to main stream as well… Sandra was sitting on a bench with other posse at UCI college CA. while I was spinning a set for a radio show. She became the girlfriend of a popular dj (I forgot his name.) He had a super successful night with Doc Martin in OC every Thursday and one night her formerly boyfriend put Sandra as opener for the night train wrecking but yet in a matter of short time she became really successful and mind you learned how to mix…Especially in the Trans communities at time Trans was just like EDM today big crowd. Honestly always loved the underground scene and niche with special clubs sure less lucrative and kept in the “underground” sort of speak but I think … stick with ya Heart the rest will follow…

          • akkamiau

            Pablo, we were just sarcastic 🙂 we could go on… Paula Temple, Jana Sleep, Mary Velo, Electric Indigo, Rebekah, Adriana Lopez, Helena Hauff, rRoxymore, Holy Herndon, Planning to Rock, Peaches…. if you wanna listen my last mix with all female:pressure artists, here:
            https://www.mixcloud.com/akkamiauprivate/fp-indefinitely/

        • Get over yourself… Grow UP!

          • Kaltès Nfriends

            Do we know each other Alexia? I am not sure you have seen my comment was a cynical answer to someone thinking there is only 5 good female artists because all he knows is the mainstream trend and have no knowledge (and interest) whatsoever of how rich and diverse the scene truly is.

      • Sure, I study sound engineer and dj over 18 years owned a studio and I mean a RECORDING STUDIO in L.A. and then Rome,Italy. So You might wanna reconsider your mathematical assumption? Suggest to do some research and instead focus on these chicks -showing “twins” or already millionaires celebs, ladies from music bands, ( I did a rmx for Macy Gray 2010 soon after she started computerised-djing.) While you “Guys” are flanging,delaying,stuttering your preset with PC’s and toys that I do like to explore myself and learn the new trend and techniques at time I used 3 turntables to create flange, delay and keep 3 records going while mastering the craft …Using my Craft I worked sweated for spending hours everyday… Salut! 😉

      • Friday

        The problem that you troll like this is that even thought there are plenty of great female producers, DJs and music professionals, they get less recognition because electronic music, as almost every other field of arts, is still male-dominated. Often, female artists are overlooked or ignored, not taken seriously or they have to prove their skills ten times more for one reason – simply ‘cos they aren’t men. female:pressure’s activities raise awareness about these issues and even their own database of artists will prove you’re wrong.

        • Pablo

          No one wants to be DJ these days technology is killing art you buy this thing traktor you count 1234 next press the button congratulations you are DJ

    • Dntbwhk

      Yuptrue

    • Dntbwhk

      Yes I agree!

    • akkamiau

      @Dntbwhk 😉 talking to yrself? all.s fine on yr side? 😉

    • akkamiau

      @Dntbwhk 😉 talking to yrself? all.s fine on yr side? 😉

    • Yoyo

      “power of crowds to effect real change” … What change ? What inequalities ?
      The article makes it look like there are as many female in electronic music as there are males, and there’s some sort of prejudice or conspiracy to keep them under-represented. Wich is absurd. Blacks are over-represented in rap music. There is no conspiracy to keep white people under-represented in rap , there is simply more black people doing rap than there are whites ( for all sorts of reasons, historical, sociological, etc..) . Same thing in country music ( more whites than blacks) and not because of some conspiracy to keep blacks out of it. There are more males than females in electronic music. Probably more women violonists than men ( although not sure..) , etc. Maybe the ratio will even out someday, maybe not.
      So what ? Why does it matter ?
      An inequality is when someone is artificially prevented from doing or achieving something. You can’t force people to go into something for the sake of creating some artificial “equality” . All you can ( and should) do is make sure there are no artificial barriers to prevent someone from doing what they love. That’s all.

      • Charlie Lesoine

        It matters because electronic music is the future of music, it’s getting more and more popular. If very few women make electronic music, as electronic music grows, there may be less and less women making music. Which is bad. Music is for everyone.

        • Yoyo

          As the number of people making EM increases, the number of women who do will too, it’s just a numbers game. As long as there are no artificial barriers to prevent someone from doing it, it doesn’t matter if the ratio of men to women is unbalanced.
          To give you an example, i often take dancing classes ( tango, salsa) and they’re overwhelmingly populated by females, the teachers are always complaining they cant get enough guys in ( wich in this case is a problem, since you need a partner to dance ). Yet there are no obscure forces at work to keep guys out of it, men just don’t seem as interested in dance as women are. Same thing in ballet and contemporary dance, it’s overwhelmingly female populated, yet men are perfectly capable dancers. Despite this imbalance, creativity in choreography hasn’t exactly suffered.
          I still think it doesn’t matter. Just make sure that everyone is welcome , and that there are no artificial barriers, then let people choose whatever they want to do. If there’s one gender, race or sexual orientation that ends up outnumbering another, so be it.

          • Friday

            Dear Yoyo. There is a difference between the topic written above and your experience with dance classes. Even though less men are interested in dance classes, I guess the ones who do visit them aren’t put down or made fun of and when a man decides to be a professional dancer, I don’t think he is questioned about his skills and abilities, sexually harassed or not being taken seriously – but these are experiences of almost every female electronic music professional.

            The issue isn’t only about numbers of actual female el. music professionals out there (and there are plenty, but there could be more if they wouldn’t be discouraged cos of the technology – but that’s a topic for another discussion), but about why the ones who *already make music or work in the el. music business* are overlooked or not being taken as seriously and equally as their male peers.

            As you can see when you check out female:pressure activities, it’s about not including female artists in line-ups of parties or festivals, not including them on recording labels, about preferring male music journalists or other professionals, it’s about the behavior towards female music professionals (ridiculing them, overlooking them, assuming they didn’t actually made the music – that happens very often for example) which should be changed. And it’s about encouraging other female-identified beings and actually anybody who wants to, but has doubts or is scared to make electronic music or be somehow involved, to actually do it! It’s about networking, collaborating, supporting, sharing and raising awareness.

            Of course nobody is saying that everybody does that and I am happy for every single positive experience, but I just attended a panel discussion organized by Akkamiau two days ago and it was very interesting to hear all the famous musicians talking about their experiences (positive but often negative), which prove that there is still a lot of work to do here.

      • akkamiau

        dear Yoyo,

        your assumption is based on the simple fact that you are just not informed enough…. you know, and its time to change this….. to inform, to educate, to inspire people, no matter what gender they are….. people like YOU actually make this inequality worst, but reassuring it… (you would actually approve this: just cause you are black, you should do rap, but play classical music? *what the heck, right… how come this could happen, when its not coming out of your cultural roots….)

        So, our change goes to each individual PERSON, no matter of what color, what gender, what belief is into…. (sure from our biologically determined position we say female “first”, but not female only…).

        For us its important to set up the situation for example: no single one “young white boy” will have to feel like Eminem anymore. You know what I mean? There is a LOT of woman, who experienced prejudice, dismissing, denial heir possibilities…. (did you hear about Bjork and Arca case, for example??)

        Only if you would be interested in, you could discover whole ocean, oh no, whole universe of women producers,,,, DID YOU CLICK ON SOME OF THE LINKS actually???????? let me copy paste for you again: http://femalepressure.tumblr.com/

        ….or the title was enough to make you write such a comment…

        And I do not even have to ask, are you white male, around 20/30? right? And if I’m wrong, HOW COME you ask, why does it matter to have equal chances? Seriously, in 2015? When political situation boils around us to GET TO ALL OF US SAME CHANCES?

        But surprising enough, you say it yourself in your last comment: “An inequality is when someone is artificially prevented from doing or achieving something…..All you can ( and should) do is make sure there are no artificial barriers to prevent someone from doing what they love. ”

        and this EXACTLY what is happening… and EXACTLY what we are trying to do…

        I think, already by writing your comment, you showed us your interest on this matter, and we thank you for opening a discussion with us! And I mean it, I hope you will find out more, about everything… not just this particular male/female issue! All the best for you! Cheers Lena

        • Yoyo

          Dear Lena,

          As english is not my first language ( not even my second language actually) , I don’t know if it’s me who is not expressing things well enough, or just you who is not getting it at all. You’re putting things in my mouth wich i never said . WHERE DID I EVER SAY THAT YOU HAVE TO DO RAP IF YOU’RE BLACK ???????

          Have you even read my second post below, wich was posted before yours ? There is a difference between saying “There are more women than men in ballet and modern dance” , and saying ” YOU SHOULD not do ballet and modern dance if you’re a man”. The first one is an observation, not an injonction. There are more women than men in dance, more black than whites in rap, more texans than chinese in country music, etc..

          I’m a male. I’m interested in dance. Every class I go to is 80% women. Why am i not getting the feel that there is a conspiracy to keep men out of it ? Am I wrong to think there isn’t ? Should I start thinking that you, Lena, are close-minded and don’t want me to join dance classes ? So when are you going to stop your “prejudice and denial” against me ?

          “And I do not even have to ask, are you white male, around 20/30?”

          Heh 🙂 Your own prejudice at work then. Nope : I’m male, in my mid forties, dark skinned, originally from a region where people are the most villified on earth right now. The kind that will get you a thourough body search at airports, and an almost certain chance to get your job application rejected in some countries ( in Europe where I live), and the police asking you for your papers every 10 meters while walking… Now THAT is a real problem.

          I also do electronic music. There are almost no well known person in EM that’s from the same origin as me. None.
          Bizarrely enough, I don’t think it’s because white western people are intentionaly trying from preventing me or others from doing EM, there are simply very few people like me doing EM, most of them prefer rap, or pop-rock. For various historical socio-demographic reasons. Should I just start screaming prejudice if a record label is not interested in my music for example? What if they’re just not into my music ? Are YOU, Lena ,since you’re a white judeo-christian westerner (I assume ) , actively trying to prevent me from doing EM because of my origin ?

          There ARE areas of life where there is REAL prejudice. And there are areas where there is not, or in very minor amounts. By screaming wolf everytime, everywhere, we weaken the attention where it’s really needed.
          Cheers , Yoyo.

          • akkamiau

            its ok, Yoyo, we probably do not understand each other, and chats are really bad place for any kind of solution, i see it more wait of the time, your and mine too 🙂 i didnt want to leave you without reply, but yes, exactly either we are not expressing things well enough, or both of us are not getting it at all. I didnt meant what i wrote as you have perceived it, therefore further explaining is redundant,
            i liked your dance story though! wish you the best in your music production as well! L.

            • ak

              wait should be “waste” sorry, busy and tired…

          • Will

            With respect…

            I’m a male. I’m interested in dance. Every class I go to is 80% women. Why am i not getting the feel that there is a conspiracy to keep men out of it ?

            … because you’re a man and most of the systems in the world aren’t already conspiring against your gender.

            • NotWill

              “.. because you’re a man and most of the systems in the world aren’t already conspiring against your gender.”
              So you believe the reason there are more men than women doing electronic music is because there is a conspiracy to keep them out of electronic music ?

            • Will

              No. I shouldn’t have used your word, ‘conspiring’. Replace it with the word ‘working’.

              … because you’re a man and most of the systems in the world aren’t already conspiring working against your gender.

            • NotWill

              Have you considered the idea that sometimes , people aren’t attracted to certain things, because , well, they are just not attracted to them, and not because there are systems working against them ? It works for both sexes. Sometimes, men and women really choose to do ( or not to do ) some things willingly . Yeah i know, free will, crazy idea…

            • No, NotWill. 100% of everyone should make electronic music! That’s the CDM perspective. 😉

              Okay, now that I’ve gotten my own personal bias out of the way —

              Of course, people are free to choose not to make electronic music (crazy as that is, and shame that they’re missing out). But the point is, this is a huge network of women who are already making electronic music and feel a) bookings don’t reflect that, b) the portrayal in the media doesn’t represent their involvement and technical savvy, and c) they find there are obstacles to sharing what they love with other women.

              Now, back to the dance class metaphor from much earlier, can this work both ways? Of course – and, actually, I think part of maintaining sexist norms is making guys feel like they have to be overly ‘masculine’ or can’t be ballet dancers or can’t knit, and in fact, there are guys who are strong advocates for things like knitting. (I’m trying to remember, there was a New York Giants player who published a knitting book or something like that … but this is absolutely part of what mainstream feminism gives you the freedom to do.)

              And while I’ve said it before in this thread, this is absolutely the bottom line. If you can become aware of privilege, of obstacles to people’s freedom to choose, what you get is more freedom to choose for everyone. You spend your energy on what you love.

            • Will

              Have you considered the idea that sometimes , people aren’t attracted to certain things, because , well, they are just not attracted to them, and not because there are systems working against them ?

              Yes. Of course.

              Have you considered the idea that sometimes, people aren’t attracted to certain things because they don’t see themselves in it? Maybe that’s a piece of art or maybe it’s a bar or maybe it’s a scene. Or, are attracted to certain things but don’t want to deal with the extra bullshit that comes with being involved with a thing? How many men would like to dance in your class but choose not to because the desire to participate is outweighed but the desire to avoid dealing with the bullshit opinions of others that comes with participation?

              Maybe they don’t want to dance badly enough! Maybe they’re just not attracted to it. Or maybe they should be able to decide to participate in the dance class without any of the associated bullshit and go from there. It’s a barrier to entry. You know, free will.

              Let me put it like this: When a woman shows up at the dance studio asking about ballet class, no one bats an eye. When a man shows up at a music store asking about sequencers, no one bats an eye. Flip the genders and things go sideways. female:pressure is trying to stop that for the latter scenario. What, exactly, is so disagreeable about that?

        • foljs

          “””your assumption is based on the simple fact that you are just not informed enough…. you know, and its time to change this….. to inform, to educate, to inspire people, no matter what gender they are….. people like YOU actually make this inequality worst, but reassuring it…”””

          This sounds quite paternalistic and “hollier-than-thou” to me.

          What makes you “better informed”? Merely the fact that you have this particular position on the matter?

          “””you would actually approve this: just cause you are black, you should do rap, but play classical music? *what the heck, right… how come this could happen, when its not coming out of your cultural roots….”””

          Not sure where you’re getting at. What he said is that blacks tend to opt for certain styles (rnb, hip hop, and previously jazz, blues, soul, etc, etc) more because of historical reasons: they invented them, they represent their culture, etc.

          Of course they can play classical music, and many do. But there will never be as many as, e.g. white europeans playing classical music, because for African Americans the music of white europeans of the previous centuries is not really their jam.

          And really no reason we should encourage more blacks to play classic music just to get some BS “equality”. If you want equality start with not shooting them in the street, better pay, less legal prejudice, less ignoring their municipal needs by white mayors, and it will grow from there.

          In fact, whites (the government, some cultural groups, etc) pushing blacks to go for “classical music” would be an external attack on their culture, as if to say “hip-hop and such ain’t worth as much”. Kind of like Americans used to put Native Americans in consentration camps to teach them how to forget their culture and behave like whites.

          Tastes and cultures grow organically, and sometimes they meet and exchange ideas, other times more, other times less. That’s how you get cultures with character — as opposed to some post-modern homogeneous BS 24/7, from L.A. to Tokyo.

          • Yes, but the volunteer organization of women run by women activating a network of women isn’t forcing anything on anyone.

            These are people self-organized because they feel they need that network in order to make the music they want to make.

            And, really, that’s all you need to know. All the rest of this discussion can end there.

      • I think it’s always worth asking these questions – not assuming the answers.

        I do feel there are some arguments to be made here, however. The popularity of this network speaks to some way in which people feel they’re not on a level playing field. And, generally, I’d say electronic music is anything but a level playing field to begin with – if you have money, for instance, if you fit the mold of what people expect artists should look like, if your music sounds like what people have heard before, all these things help you advance and none of them are what I think we’d describe as merit or innovation.

        In the case of the reasoning behind the Visibility blog, you know, it’s difficult to go on much more than anecdotal evidence. But anecdotal evidence is pretty overwhelming – I don’t know a single woman working in technology or production who hasn’t encountered some pretty unnerving discrimination about their competence. And we’ve seen pretty big-name producers (Björk!) who have said that even with the privilege fame affords, they still have to make an argument that they’re technically competent.

        And maybe the dance class metaphor is actually apt. I believe we need to live in societies where everyone dances and everyone sings, or it’s not a healthy society. I likewise believe we live in a modern world where everyone needs to engage comfortably with mathematics, science, engineering, and personal expression – and electronic music is a singular combination of all of these things. The reasons women may be marginalized from these areas are complicated, but there is a whole lot of evidence that it’s happening, and if that infects our music sphere, there’s reason for concern.

        I think CDM has some obligation as does the rest of the press to look at all of these issues. And I absolutely agree that shouldn’t be limited to gender.

        In this case, f:p is a participatory network, and it’s a crowd funding campaign. If people find these activities useful, and specifically *this* network, then they can become active in some way or share resources. If they don’t, they can choose another route. So I think people rightfully vote with their own time and treasure. Zuzana I know was enthusiastic as an observer of the network as Akkamiau is enthusiastic about being one of its organizers. I don’t think you have to feel obligated by this call, and I do believe it should be open to criticism.

        • foljs

          “””I do feel there are some arguments to be made here, however. The popularity of this network speaks to some way in which people feel they’re not on a level playing field. “””

          Only as much as the popularity of the KKK speaks to some way in which people feel blacks are a menace.

          That is, arguments by popularity don’t prove much.

          “”” And, generally, I’d say electronic music is anything but a level playing field to begin with – if you have money, for instance, if you fit the mold of what people expect artists should look like, if your music sounds like what people have heard before, all these things help you advance and none of them are what I think we’d describe as merit or innovation.”””

          That’s the same for any other endeavour. And that’s how capitalism (for the first) and society (for the latter) inherently works.

          You could always fight for socialism then — which would cover the “if you have money” thing, and which is not a man vs woman thing.

          As for the seond “if you fit the mold of what people expect artists should look like, if your music sounds like what people have heard before” I don’t think you can bypass that.

          It’s like saying “I’d like the majority of people to dig unheard before styles”, not to mention that the “merit” you see in them is first and foremost a personal judgement.

          • Polite Society

            It’s an easy thing from a point of privilege to say that there isn’t a problem, because the problem is invisible to you.

            http://thehathorlegacy.com/invisible-privilege-a-handy-snappy-definition-2/

            • NotWill

              While I agree that people are often unconscious about advantages they might have, just remember one thing : show me anyone, and I’ll show you how privileged they are compared to another group of people on earth. If you look at the world ony through the lens of oppressor/victim ( what a sad way to go thru life) , then everyone is someone else’s oppressor. And if everyone is surely oppressing ( directly or indirectly ) someone else on earth, then everyone is a victim of someone else too. In fact everyone is encouraged right now to see themselves as victims, it’s becoming the main way to build your identity. You have no free will, and you’re not responsible for anything in your life . What a relief !

              There’s now a pissing contest where everyone fights to prove that their suffering is superior to that of another group of humans and must be given priority. How do you measure suffering ? Is there a scientific objective scale to that ?

              Especially in America , where everyone also automatically assumes that their tropes, priorities and perception of the world is shared by the whole planet . And since we’re in the business of sweeping generalisations, let’s make another one : America is built on confrontation and competition. This has been so much internalised that people have become unable to define themselves as humans first. No, they must be part of a group , a clan, a subdivision, so that another group , clan or subdivision can be proclaimed as the enemy. If there is no enemy, you must create one ( and America is a master at that ). Like I said before, it has become the main way most americans build their personal identity ( and also assumes everyone else on earth should do the same )

            • It’s absolutely true that anyone on this thread has some sort of privilege. And that’s a reason why it’s important to view all these questions as multi-dimensional. And gender can’t be the only dimension, either.

              Not everyone is going to be comfortable identifying with female:pressure as a network; I know some very specific female artists who don’t want to.

              But let’s be clear: this is not female:pressure, the suffering network. They’re celebrating music and musicians, and they’re just one network among many.

    • Yoyo

      “power of crowds to effect real change” … What change ? What inequalities ?
      The article makes it look like there are as many female in electronic music as there are males, and there’s some sort of prejudice or conspiracy to keep them under-represented. Wich is absurd. Blacks are over-represented in rap music. There is no conspiracy to keep white people under-represented in rap , there is simply more black people doing rap than there are whites ( for all sorts of reasons, historical, sociological, etc..) . Same thing in country music ( more whites than blacks) and not because of some conspiracy to keep blacks out of it. There are more males than females in electronic music. Probably more women violonists than men ( although not sure..) , etc. Maybe the ratio will even out someday, maybe not.
      So what ? Why does it matter ?
      An inequality is when someone is artificially prevented from doing or achieving something. You can’t force people to go into something for the sake of creating some artificial “equality” . All you can ( and should) do is make sure there are no artificial barriers to prevent someone from doing what they love. That’s all.

      • It matters because electronic music is the future of music, it’s getting more and more popular. If very few women make electronic music, as electronic music grows, there may be less and less women making music. Which is bad. Music is for everyone.

        • Yoyo

          As the number of people making EM increases, the number of women who do will too, it’s just a numbers game. As long as there are no artificial barriers to prevent someone from doing it, it doesn’t matter if the ratio of men to women is unbalanced.
          To give you an example, i often take dancing classes ( tango, salsa) and they’re overwhelmingly populated by females, the teachers are always complaining they cant get enough guys in ( wich in this case is a problem, since you need a partner to dance ). Yet there are no obscure forces at work to keep guys out of it, men just don’t seem as interested in dance as women are. Same thing in ballet and contemporary dance, it’s overwhelmingly female populated, yet men are perfectly capable dancers. Despite this imbalance, creativity in choreography hasn’t exactly suffered.
          I still think it doesn’t matter. Just make sure that everyone is welcome , and that there are no artificial barriers, then let people choose whatever they want to do. If there’s one gender, race or sexual orientation that ends up outnumbering another, so be it.

          • Friday

            Dear Yoyo. There is a difference between the topic written above and your experience with dance classes. Even though less men are interested in dance classes, I guess the ones who do visit them aren’t put down or made fun of and when a man decides to be a professional dancer, I don’t think he is questioned about his skills and abilities, sexually harassed or not being taken seriously – but these are experiences of almost every female electronic music professional.

            The issue isn’t only about numbers of actual female el. music professionals out there (and there are plenty, but there could be more if they wouldn’t be discouraged cos of the technology – but that’s a topic for another discussion), but about why the ones who *already make music or work in the el. music business* are overlooked or not being taken as seriously and equally as their male peers.

            As you can see when you check out female:pressure activities, it’s about not including female artists in line-ups of parties or festivals, not including them on recording labels, about preferring male music journalists or other professionals, it’s about the behavior towards female music professionals (ridiculing them, overlooking them, assuming they didn’t actually made the music – that happens very often for example) which should be changed. And it’s about encouraging other female-identified beings and actually anybody who wants to, but has doubts or is scared to make electronic music or be somehow involved, to actually do it! It’s about networking, collaborating, supporting, sharing and raising awareness.

            Of course nobody is saying that everybody does that and I am happy for every single positive experience, but I just attended a panel discussion organized by Akkamiau two days ago and it was very interesting to hear all the famous musicians talking about their experiences (positive but often negative), which prove that there is still a lot of work to do here.

      • akkamiau

        dear Yoyo,

        your assumption is based on the simple fact that you are just not informed enough…. you know, and its time to change this….. to inform, to educate, to inspire people, no matter what gender they are….. people like YOU actually make this inequality worst, but reassuring it… (you would actually approve this: just cause you are black, you should do rap, but play classical music? *what the heck, right… how come this could happen, when its not coming out of your cultural roots….)

        So, our change goes to each individual PERSON, no matter of what color, what gender, what belief is into…. (sure from our biologically determined position we say female “first”, but not female only…).

        For us its important to set up the situation for example: no single one “young white boy” will have to feel like Eminem anymore. You know what I mean? There is a LOT of woman, who experienced prejudice, dismissing, denial heir possibilities…. (did you hear about Bjork and Arca case, for example??)

        Only if you would be interested in, you could discover whole ocean, oh no, whole universe of women producers,,,, DID YOU CLICK ON SOME OF THE LINKS actually???????? let me copy paste for you again: http://femalepressure.tumblr.com/

        ….or the title was enough to make you write such a comment…

        And I do not even have to ask, are you white male, around 20/30? right? And if I’m wrong, HOW COME you ask, why does it matter to have equal chances? Seriously, in 2015? When political situation boils around us to GET TO ALL OF US SAME CHANCES?

        But surprising enough, you say it yourself in your last comment: “An inequality is when someone is artificially prevented from doing or achieving something…..All you can ( and should) do is make sure there are no artificial barriers to prevent someone from doing what they love. ”

        and this EXACTLY what is happening… and EXACTLY what we are trying to do…

        I think, already by writing your comment, you showed us your interest on this matter, and we thank you for opening a discussion with us! And I mean it, I hope you will find out more, about everything… not just this particular male/female issue! All the best for you! Cheers Lena

        • Yoyo

          Dear Lena,

          As english is not my first language ( not even my second language actually) , I don’t know if it’s me who is not expressing things well enough, or just you who is not getting it at all. You’re putting things in my mouth wich i never said . WHERE DID I EVER SAY THAT YOU HAVE TO DO RAP IF YOU’RE BLACK ???????

          Have you even read my second post below, wich was posted before yours ? There is a difference between saying “There are more women than men in ballet and modern dance” , and saying ” YOU SHOULD not do ballet and modern dance if you’re a man”. The first one is an observation, not an injonction. There are more women than men in dance, more black than whites in rap, more texans than chinese in country music, etc..

          I’m a male. I’m interested in dance. Every class I go to is 80% women. Why am i not getting the feel that there is a conspiracy to keep men out of it ? Am I wrong to think there isn’t ? Should I start thinking that you, Lena, are close-minded and don’t want me to join dance classes ? So when are you going to stop your “prejudice and denial” against me ?

          “And I do not even have to ask, are you white male, around 20/30?”

          Heh 🙂 Your own prejudice at work then. Nope : I’m male, in my mid forties, dark skinned, originally from a region where people are the most villified on earth right now. The kind that will get you a thourough body search at airports, and an almost certain chance to get your job application rejected in some countries ( in Europe where I live), and the police asking you for your papers every 10 meters while walking… Now THAT is a real problem.

          I also do electronic music. There are almost no well known person in EM that’s from the same origin as me. None.
          Bizarrely enough, I don’t think it’s because white western people are intentionaly trying from preventing me or others from doing EM, there are simply very few people like me doing EM, most of them prefer rap, or pop-rock. For various historical socio-demographic reasons. Should I just start screaming prejudice if a record label is not interested in my music for example? What if they’re just not into my music ? Are YOU, Lena ,since you’re a white judeo-christian westerner (I assume ) , actively trying to prevent me from doing EM because of my origin ?

          There ARE areas of life where there is REAL prejudice. And there are areas where there is not, or in very minor amounts. By screaming wolf everytime, everywhere, we weaken the attention where it’s really needed.
          Cheers , Yoyo.

          • akkamiau

            its ok, Yoyo, we probably do not understand each other, and chats are really bad place for any kind of solution, i see it more wait of the time, your and mine too 🙂 i didnt want to leave you without reply, but yes, exactly either we are not expressing things well enough, or both of us are not getting it at all. I didnt meant what i wrote as you have perceived it, therefore further explaining is redundant,
            i liked your dance story though! wish you the best in your music production as well! L.

            • ak

              wait should be “waste” sorry, busy and tired…

          • Will

            With respect…

            I’m a male. I’m interested in dance. Every class I go to is 80% women. Why am i not getting the feel that there is a conspiracy to keep men out of it ?

            … because you’re a man and most of the systems in the world aren’t already conspiring against your gender.

            • NotWill

              “.. because you’re a man and most of the systems in the world aren’t already conspiring against your gender.”
              So you believe the reason there are more men than women doing electronic music is because there is a conspiracy to keep them out of electronic music ?

            • Will

              No. I shouldn’t have used your word, ‘conspiring’. Replace it with the word ‘working’.

              … because you’re a man and most of the systems in the world aren’t already conspiring working against your gender.

            • NotWill

              Have you considered the idea that sometimes , people aren’t attracted to certain things, because , well, they are just not attracted to them, and not because there are systems working against them ? It works for both sexes. Sometimes, men and women really choose to do ( or not to do ) some things willingly . Yeah i know, free will, crazy idea…

            • No, NotWill. 100% of everyone should make electronic music! That’s the CDM perspective. 😉

              Okay, now that I’ve gotten my own personal bias out of the way —

              Of course, people are free to choose not to make electronic music (crazy as that is, and shame that they’re missing out). But the point is, this is a huge network of women who are already making electronic music and feel a) bookings don’t reflect that, b) the portrayal in the media doesn’t represent their involvement and technical savvy, and c) they find there are obstacles to sharing what they love with other women.

              Now, back to the dance class metaphor from much earlier, can this work both ways? Of course – and, actually, I think part of maintaining sexist norms is making guys feel like they have to be overly ‘masculine’ or can’t be ballet dancers or can’t knit, and in fact, there are guys who are strong advocates for things like knitting. (I’m trying to remember, there was a New York Giants player who published a knitting book or something like that … but this is absolutely part of what mainstream feminism gives you the freedom to do.)

              And while I’ve said it before in this thread, this is absolutely the bottom line. If you can become aware of privilege, of obstacles to people’s freedom to choose, what you get is more freedom to choose for everyone. You spend your energy on what you love.

            • Will

              Have you considered the idea that sometimes , people aren’t attracted to certain things, because , well, they are just not attracted to them, and not because there are systems working against them ?

              Yes. Of course.

              Have you considered the idea that sometimes, people aren’t attracted to certain things because they don’t see themselves in it? Maybe that’s a piece of art or maybe it’s a bar or maybe it’s a scene. Or, are attracted to certain things but don’t want to deal with the extra bullshit that comes with being involved with a thing? How many men would like to dance in your class but choose not to because the desire to participate is outweighed but the desire to avoid dealing with the bullshit opinions of others that comes with participation?

              Maybe they don’t want to dance badly enough! Maybe they’re just not attracted to it. Or maybe they should be able to decide to participate in the dance class without any of the associated bullshit and go from there. It’s a barrier to entry. You know, free will.

              Let me put it like this: When a woman shows up at the dance studio asking about ballet class, no one bats an eye. When a man shows up at a music store asking about sequencers, no one bats an eye. Flip the genders and things go sideways. female:pressure is trying to stop that for the latter scenario. What, exactly, is so disagreeable about that?

        • foljs

          “””your assumption is based on the simple fact that you are just not informed enough…. you know, and its time to change this….. to inform, to educate, to inspire people, no matter what gender they are….. people like YOU actually make this inequality worst, but reassuring it…”””

          This sounds quite paternalistic and “hollier-than-thou” to me.

          What makes you “better informed”? Merely the fact that you have this particular position on the matter?

          “””you would actually approve this: just cause you are black, you should do rap, but play classical music? *what the heck, right… how come this could happen, when its not coming out of your cultural roots….”””

          Not sure where you’re getting at. What he said is that blacks tend to opt for certain styles (rnb, hip hop, and previously jazz, blues, soul, etc, etc) more because of historical reasons: they invented them, they represent their culture, etc.

          Of course they can play classical music, and many do. But there will never be as many as, e.g. white europeans playing classical music, because for African Americans the music of white europeans of the previous centuries is not really their jam.

          And really no reason we should encourage more blacks to play classic music just to get some BS “equality”. If you want equality start with not shooting them in the street, better pay, less legal prejudice, less ignoring their municipal needs by white mayors, and it will grow from there.

          In fact, whites (the government, some cultural groups, etc) pushing blacks to go for “classical music” would be an external attack on their culture, as if to say “hip-hop and such ain’t worth as much”. Kind of like Americans used to put Native Americans in consentration camps to teach them how to forget their culture and behave like whites.

          Tastes and cultures grow organically, and sometimes they meet and exchange ideas, other times more, other times less. That’s how you get cultures with character — as opposed to some post-modern homogeneous BS 24/7, from L.A. to Tokyo.

          • Yes, but the volunteer organization of women run by women activating a network of women isn’t forcing anything on anyone.

            These are people self-organized because they feel they need that network in order to make the music they want to make.

            And, really, that’s all you need to know. All the rest of this discussion can end there.

      • I think it’s always worth asking these questions – not assuming the answers.

        I do feel there are some arguments to be made here, however. The popularity of this network speaks to some way in which people feel they’re not on a level playing field. And, generally, I’d say electronic music is anything but a level playing field to begin with – if you have money, for instance, if you fit the mold of what people expect artists should look like, if your music sounds like what people have heard before, all these things help you advance and none of them are what I think we’d describe as merit or innovation.

        In the case of the reasoning behind the Visibility blog, you know, it’s difficult to go on much more than anecdotal evidence. But anecdotal evidence is pretty overwhelming – I don’t know a single woman working in technology or production who hasn’t encountered some pretty unnerving discrimination about their competence. And we’ve seen pretty big-name producers (Björk!) who have said that even with the privilege fame affords, they still have to make an argument that they’re technically competent.

        And maybe the dance class metaphor is actually apt. I believe we need to live in societies where everyone dances and everyone sings, or it’s not a healthy society. I likewise believe we live in a modern world where everyone needs to engage comfortably with mathematics, science, engineering, and personal expression – and electronic music is a singular combination of all of these things. The reasons women may be marginalized from these areas are complicated, but there is a whole lot of evidence that it’s happening, and if that infects our music sphere, there’s reason for concern.

        I think CDM has some obligation as does the rest of the press to look at all of these issues. And I absolutely agree that shouldn’t be limited to gender.

        In this case, f:p is a participatory network, and it’s a crowd funding campaign. If people find these activities useful, and specifically *this* network, then they can become active in some way or share resources. If they don’t, they can choose another route. So I think people rightfully vote with their own time and treasure. Zuzana I know was enthusiastic as an observer of the network as Akkamiau is enthusiastic about being one of its organizers. I don’t think you have to feel obligated by this call, and I do believe it should be open to criticism.

        • foljs

          “””I do feel there are some arguments to be made here, however. The popularity of this network speaks to some way in which people feel they’re not on a level playing field. “””

          Only as much as the popularity of the KKK speaks to some way in which people feel blacks are a menace.

          That is, arguments by popularity don’t prove much.

          “”” And, generally, I’d say electronic music is anything but a level playing field to begin with – if you have money, for instance, if you fit the mold of what people expect artists should look like, if your music sounds like what people have heard before, all these things help you advance and none of them are what I think we’d describe as merit or innovation.”””

          That’s the same for any other endeavour. And that’s how capitalism (for the first) and society (for the latter) inherently works.

          You could always fight for socialism then — which would cover the “if you have money” thing, and which is not a man vs woman thing.

          As for the seond “if you fit the mold of what people expect artists should look like, if your music sounds like what people have heard before” I don’t think you can bypass that.

          It’s like saying “I’d like the majority of people to dig unheard before styles”, not to mention that the “merit” you see in them is first and foremost a personal judgement.

          • Polite Society

            It’s an easy thing from a point of privilege to say that there isn’t a problem, because the problem is invisible to you.

            http://thehathorlegacy.com/invisible-privilege-a-handy-snappy-definition-2/

            • NotWill

              While I agree that people are often unconscious about advantages they might have, just remember one thing : show me anyone, and I’ll show you how privileged they are compared to another group of people on earth. If you look at the world ony through the lens of oppressor/victim ( what a sad way to go thru life) , then everyone is someone else’s oppressor. And if everyone is surely oppressing ( directly or indirectly ) someone else on earth, then everyone is a victim of someone else too. In fact everyone is encouraged right now to see themselves as victims, it’s becoming the main way to build your identity. You have no free will, and you’re not responsible for anything in your life . What a relief !

              There’s now a pissing contest where everyone fights to prove that their suffering is superior to that of another group of humans and must be given priority. How do you measure suffering ? Is there a scientific objective scale to that ?

              Especially in America , where everyone also automatically assumes that their tropes, priorities and perception of the world is shared by the whole planet . And since we’re in the business of sweeping generalisations, let’s make another one : America is built on confrontation and competition. This has been so much internalised that people have become unable to define themselves as humans first. No, they must be part of a group , a clan, a subdivision, so that another group , clan or subdivision can be proclaimed as the enemy. If there is no enemy, you must create one ( and America is a master at that ). Like I said before, it has become the main way most americans build their personal identity ( and also assumes everyone else on earth should do the same )

            • It’s absolutely true that anyone on this thread has some sort of privilege. And that’s a reason why it’s important to view all these questions as multi-dimensional. And gender can’t be the only dimension, either.

              Not everyone is going to be comfortable identifying with female:pressure as a network; I know some very specific female artists who don’t want to.

              But let’s be clear: this is not female:pressure, the suffering network. They’re celebrating music and musicians, and they’re just one network among many.

    • DjAlexia Tippell

      Well is about time….Thanks!

    • Well is about time….Thanks!

    • monkey 8

      irrelevant. there’s only good music or bad music – doesn’t matter if it was made by a man, woman, monkey, computer, transit van. if your beats are on then cool, if they’re not on then not cool – everything else is superfluous.

      • Well, one way to look at these networks is, they’re working to make sure that this remains the case.

      • akkamiau

        if out topica is irrelevant, than you are completely ignorant, sorry… cause its not about the outcome only, it about the process…..

        • akkamiau

          …sorry mistyped… ” if our topic is….. “

      • The point is that even if women are making badass beats, oftentimes they are not being heard because they are being ignored/pushed out/undervalued.

        But of course it’s irrelevant if it doesn’t affect you personally, right? Because you are the only person in the world. *eyeroll*

    • monkey 8

      irrelevant. there’s only good music or bad music – doesn’t matter if it was made by a man, woman, monkey, computer, transit van. if your beats are on then cool, if they’re not on then not cool – everything else is superfluous.

      • Well, one way to look at these networks is, they’re working to make sure that this remains the case.

      • akkamiau

        if out topica is irrelevant, than you are completely ignorant, sorry… cause its not about the outcome only, it about the process…..

        • akkamiau

          …sorry mistyped… ” if our topic is….. “

      • The point is that even if women are making badass beats, oftentimes they are not being heard because they are being ignored/pushed out/undervalued.

        But of course it’s irrelevant if it doesn’t affect you personally, right? Because you are the only person in the world. *eyeroll*

    • I don’t understand the resistance to this idea. If anyone feels they are being undervalued then, yes, they should take action. It doesn’t mean they are trying to slight anyone else. As a friend said about the resistance to the “Black Lives Matter” movement, “if someone says ‘Save the Rainforests,’ it doesn’t mean they are saying ‘fuck all those other forests.'”

    • I don’t understand the resistance to this idea. If anyone feels they are being undervalued then, yes, they should take action. It doesn’t mean they are trying to slight anyone else. As a friend said about the resistance to the “Black Lives Matter” movement, “if someone says ‘Save the Rainforests,’ it doesn’t mean they are saying ‘fuck all those other forests.'”

    • The overwhelming nature of “this is irrelevant” from numerous commenters is alarming and disgusting. I want to say these issues could also apply to LGBT members of the electronic music demographic, but that is an argument for another time and place. As a cis male, I have a privilege that most women will never have no matter their skill level. The same goes for all of you stuffy dudes here too. Where the fuck did all of our inclusion go dudes?!?!

      Sort out your egos and check your privilege.

      • I agree. But actually, it’s a pretty small number of commenters, just extended threads.

        Look at it this way: we’ve gotten more resistance to things like specific software upgrades.

        I still say, let people say these things, and let’s talk about why we disagree.

      • Patrick

        You lost any merit your message had when you said, “check your privilege”.

    • The overwhelming nature of “this is irrelevant” from numerous commenters is alarming and disgusting. I want to say these issues could also apply to LGBT members of the electronic music demographic, but that is an argument for another time and place. As a cis male, I have a privilege that most women will never have no matter their skill level. The same goes for all of you stuffy dudes here too. Where the fuck did all of our inclusion go dudes?!?!

      Sort out your egos and check your privilege.

      • I agree. But actually, it’s a pretty small number of commenters, just extended threads.

        Look at it this way: we’ve gotten more resistance to things like specific software upgrades.

        I still say, let people say these things, and let’s talk about why we disagree.

      • Patrick

        You lost any merit your message had when you said, “check your privilege”.

    • Ezmyrelda

      Ugh.. I shouldn’t have read the comments..

      • It could have been worse… unfortunately, some illustrated the simple problem that you can’t read irony on the Internet.

        I’m going to leave this one, though. Some people actually did explain what they meant, and that’s important, even if some threads go off track.

    • Ezmyrelda

      Ugh.. I shouldn’t have read the comments..

      • It could have been worse… unfortunately, some illustrated the simple problem that you can’t read irony on the Internet.

        I’m going to leave this one, though. Some people actually did explain what they meant, and that’s important, even if some threads go off track.

    • nothingnatural

      Thanks once again Peter for using your influence to promote orgs and ideas like female:pressure. Much appreciated.

    • nothingnatural

      Thanks once again Peter for using your influence to promote orgs and ideas like female:pressure. Much appreciated.

    • political man

      Once upon a very recent time, Americans were united against the political criminals that are ruining their country. Now Americans are distracted by all these far less significant social/class issues. We have been divided and we are being conquered.

      There is only one way to fight back. We must support all sides….blacks, white, women, transgendered, etc.

    • political man

      Once upon a very recent time, Americans were united against the political criminals that are ruining their country. Now Americans are distracted by all these far less significant social/class issues. We have been divided and we are being conquered.

      There is only one way to fight back. We must support all sides….blacks, white, women, transgendered, etc.

    • paul spades

      that’s bullshit. music has no sexual gender and we’d better keep it that way.

      • I think that’s rather exactly the idea. 😉

        • paul spades

          No, you’re missing the point. Pushing for female-only communities and events only serves to separate and segregate the female artists into a niche and artificially limiting their exposure with the larger crowd and collaboration with male artists.

          There’s only one reason why there are many more male electronic musicians, and that is not misogyny. The reason is that there are more men/guys/lads/boys interested in electronic music. That’s it.

          If anything, female artists already have a huge leg up for being discovered by listeners exactly because they are fewer in number. And that’s fine, I follow quite a few and they kick ass.

          • It isn’t that simple.

            First of all, I can’t begin to agree with the idea that creating a network of women somehow becomes an obstacle to exposure or stops them from working with men. I mean, if you create a network of Ableton Live users or a club for experimental ambient musicians in Des Moines, that hardly shuts you off from the rest of the world. It bands you together with people with a shared interest. In this case, the interest is a feeling of a lack of connections and exposure. And this network specifically has activities like disseminating calls for works and so on.

            In fact, if women have been self-selecting themselves out of, say, a call for open works, that’s all the more reason that creating this sort of network is a necessity. That is, if you believe electronic music is something that should appeal to women as much as men, and I happen to believe that.

            Second – to say that there’s just one reason for this effect is itself I think wildly unrealistic. We know there are all sorts of societal, economic, and cultural reasons people might steer away from music technology.

            And then again, if you believe as I do that understanding technology is essential to being a modern musician, then there’s a huge incentive to try to lower all of those barriers in whatever way you can.

            I don’t represent female:pressure, and neither does Zuzana (the author of this article). This isn’t our solution to these questions; it’s theirs. But I think their solution is worth talking about, and worth considering, as part of the larger electronic music landscape.

    • paul spades

      that’s bullshit. music has no sexual gender and we’d better keep it that way.

      • I think that’s rather exactly the idea. 😉

        • paul spades

          No, you’re missing the point. Pushing for female-only communities and events only serves to separate and segregate the female artists into a niche and artificially limiting their exposure with the larger crowd and collaboration with male artists.

          There’s only one reason why there are many more male electronic musicians, and that is not misogyny. The reason is that there are more men/guys/lads/boys interested in electronic music. That’s it.

          If anything, female artists already have a huge leg up for being discovered by listeners exactly because they are fewer in number. And that’s fine, I follow quite a few and they kick ass.

          • It isn’t that simple.

            First of all, I can’t begin to agree with the idea that creating a network of women somehow becomes an obstacle to exposure or stops them from working with men. I mean, if you create a network of Ableton Live users or a club for experimental ambient musicians in Des Moines, that hardly shuts you off from the rest of the world. It bands you together with people with a shared interest. In this case, the interest is a feeling of a lack of connections and exposure. And this network specifically has activities like disseminating calls for works and so on.

            In fact, if women have been self-selecting themselves out of, say, a call for open works, that’s all the more reason that creating this sort of network is a necessity. That is, if you believe electronic music is something that should appeal to women as much as men, and I happen to believe that.

            Second – to say that there’s just one reason for this effect is itself I think wildly unrealistic. We know there are all sorts of societal, economic, and cultural reasons people might steer away from music technology.

            And then again, if you believe as I do that understanding technology is essential to being a modern musician, then there’s a huge incentive to try to lower all of those barriers in whatever way you can.

            I don’t represent female:pressure, and neither does Zuzana (the author of this article). This isn’t our solution to these questions; it’s theirs. But I think their solution is worth talking about, and worth considering, as part of the larger electronic music landscape.

    • Will

      It’s hard to underestimate the power of representation. For the less adventurous and/or not supremely gifted among us (most of us), seeing someone who looks like us doing something often times opens up the possibility in our own minds. It also opens others up to the benefits of inclusion.

      Ignoring for the moment the social ills represented in professional sports, 50-60 years ago (in the US anyway) professional sports was a whites-only affair. Black children did not aspire to be professional athletes. White stadium visitors would be damned if they’d cheer for one. As representation began, minds began to shift and possibilities expanded (both aspirational and inclusional).

      Even if statements like “electronic music is mostly made by men because men gravitate towards it more” were true, isn’t it at least possible that it’s true precisely because of under-representation? female:pressure is simply promoting representation.

    • Will

      It’s hard to underestimate the power of representation. For the less adventurous and/or not supremely gifted among us (most of us), seeing someone who looks like us doing something often times opens up the possibility in our own minds. It also opens others up to the benefits of inclusion.

      Ignoring for the moment the social ills represented in professional sports, 50-60 years ago (in the US anyway) professional sports was a whites-only affair. Black children did not aspire to be professional athletes. White stadium visitors would be damned if they’d cheer for one. As representation began, minds began to shift and possibilities expanded (both aspirational and inclusional).

      Even if statements like “electronic music is mostly made by men because men gravitate towards it more” were true, isn’t it at least possible that it’s true precisely because of under-representation? female:pressure is simply promoting representation.