ipadchart

The iPad isn’t just a gadget any more. There’s now enough of an app ecosystem that investing in an iPad is investing in a creative platform that turns into lots of other things. That is, it really is like another computer.

For music, that means a lot. An iPad is a drum machine, or a vocal processor. It’s a practice aid, a simulated guitar amp. It’s an extension of your desktop music software, too, whether controlling instruments and transport in Logic or live sets in Ableton. It’s a DJ tool.

Of course, the same is true of a computer. And with computers and hardware (keyboards, stompboxes, Eurorack) competing for your wallet’s attention, the iPad has to justify itself. What it isn’t – which it is for a lot of the general public – is just a window through which you watch Orange is the New Black on Netflix. And so, if the tablet is plateauing for the general public, there is a reason to think the iPad means something different to a creative person.

Apple must think so, too, given it just unveiled a top-of-range iPad called “Pro.” But here’s the trick to it: the iPad Pro is turning out to be really an iPad Big. The introduction of fancy exclusive accessories (Pencil and a keyboard cover) disguise the fact that you can get similar accessories from third parties for less.

No, Apple has really evened out the iPad line. And that means what you’re really buying is two things: size and speed. I’ve put together some rough charts (in Apple Numbers, natch) to demonstrate just that.

ipads_pro

What the lineup has in common…

Each iPad in the current line has a Retina Display. (The iPad Pro bumps the resolution to 2732×2048, which developers will have to support, but screen density stays the same.) Each has the same Lightning port. Each has the same basic underlying 64-bit architecture. Each has the same aspect ratio (cough, Android).

There’s one generational difference. The iPad Air 2, iPad mini 4, and iPad Pro all have a new laminated, antireflective display that should look a bit better, a fingerprint reader that’s a whole lot more secure and convenient, and newer-generation processors. They also have true, side-by-side multitasking – what Apple calls Split View. Not even all developers I’ve talked to agree, but I think that’ll be a big boon to productivity in music production. (The other current models do support a Slide Over mode.)

So, which should you get?

That depends on what you want. I’ve made some handy charts.

I had to cheat a little. I think no one should buy a 16GB iPad – you won’t even have enough room for your apps, and if you’re a musician, you’re also likely to need some audio. 32GB for most applications is fine, because at some point, you’re probably tethering to a computer. Depending on model, either a 32GB or 64GB model is what’s available as what I think ought to be the entry level. (If you intend to DJ with an iPad, or record a lot of audio, then maybe a 128GB model makes sense – just be ready to pay for it).

In the first chart, you see screen size versus cost (relative speed is represented by circle size). And you see that screen size is what you really pay for. The trend line – and that’s a real power-based trend line – also clearly delineates the generational gap I mentioned earlier.

If speed is your main priority, well – you’ll get the iPad Pro. It’s an order of magnitude faster than the others, which in music could have big implications for people who want their whole workflow on the iPad. It means you can multitask and use Audiobus and not run out of steam. On the other hand, budgeting a little extra for the new generation in the smaller sizes also gives you more computing room, if you can’t stomach the Pro (or can’t wait until November):

speedversuscost

What I think is most interesting is how much you pay for screen size. Personally, I love the mini. It has the highest screen density of any iPad, so it looks terrific. Basically, any app will run on it. It’s all down to the size of your hands – but that ultra-compact size means it’s easier to carry and easier to fit into a stage rig and easier to hold in your hand. And it unquestionably delivers the most performance for money.

In fact, to me, the sweet spot right now is the new 64GB iPad mini 4. It does multitasking, it’s really reasonably fast with an A8 processor, and it’s not so hard to afford. But… I have small hands and I like things to be small, so I expect that iPad Air (the original) will also look like a good entry point to a lot of people.

Here’s how the three stack up visually (photo courtesy Apple):

ipadsize

Enter the Pro

On the other hand, you also see that the iPad Pro could be a great lasting investment. And I think it’s going to wind up being a hit with musicians for an unexpected reason.

A lot of musicians still have older iPads banging around. That means they’ve been saving up. A single machine gives them everything – a vastly-faster processor that keeps up with laptops, a huge screen, true multitasking (and a screen where it makes sense), and all the latest hardware enhancements Apple has gradually worked out over the years. Update: RAM – I should also observe that it almost certainly has 4GB of RAM, which is more typical in Androidland but new to iOS, and very useful. It’s brutally expensive for a tablet, of course, but the reality is that a lot of laptops are doing just fine, so I could see people investing in this and delaying the laptop purchase. I have no doubt this is going to cannibalize sales of Mac (and PC) laptops, not as a replacement, but because those machines are doing just fine.

And all of this means the iPad line is starting to look more appealing to app developers. Unlike other markets, musicians have been happy to spend $40 or $50 for an app if they really want it. And they’ve also been willing to use apps that do less but focus more on iOS than the feature-overloaded desktop counterparts.

Will developers immediately start investing huge amounts of resources in this? Of course not.

But two things will happen: one, developers are all going to be buying iPads Pro for themselves, and trying them out, and two, since it isn’t much work to port existing iOS apps to a new screen resolution, you’ll see some app updates. And beyond that, who knows.

surfacepro

And the competition…

While I’m breaking down iPad value, don’t think for a second that I think this diminishes the PC as we traditionally know it.

I wonder if Microsoft’s Surface and the PC touch ilk will see some new attention. The main problem there is a lack of touch-driven apps. But now that it’s clear Apple sees iPads as things with touch and MacBooks as things without, maybe more developers will experiment on the PC. I also think touch machines on the PC side are reaching a critical mass to support an ecosystem – though it needs a lot more support from Microsoft, and supporting developers and pros is clearly an area where Apple has an edge.

With Microsoft set to make some big announcements at the beginning of October, any Windows fans there should definitely wait. (I have to admit, I love the idea of a machine that’s a tablet that runs vvvv and FL Studio and SONAR on it, too.)

Apple did its own MacBook line a huge favor by failing to add a new port to the Pro (like the expected USB-C port). The iPad Pro simply can’t stand on its own – literally or figuratively (cough, kickstand). Even in the new big size, it’s still going to be a satellite to a laptop for most people. Laptops remain faster for the money, they still have more storage and expandability and configurability, and they’re still necessary for our most essential apps.

It just might be that you squeeze life out of your desktop PCs and laptops a little longer and see if you can budget for that iPad Pro. Though… wait, look at this synthesizer…

Data courtesy Apple; find more comparisons on their new site (just without my graphical aids):

http://www.apple.com/ipad/compare/

  • Pierre Fontaine

    Excellent timing for this article. I’m now contemplating purchasing a newer iPad to replace my iPad 2. I also do most of my work on PCs (rather than Macs) and have been curious about the Surface line as well (not that the RT line has been discontinued). I never could take advantage of AudioBus on my iPad 2 and was always a bit frustrated by how much work it was to get this app to communicate with another. On the other hand, a Surface (or any higher-end PC laptop) would run my existing software. Decisions, decisions, decisions….

  • Pierre Fontaine

    Excellent timing for this article. I’m now contemplating purchasing a newer iPad to replace my iPad 2. I also do most of my work on PCs (rather than Macs) and have been curious about the Surface line as well (not that the RT line has been discontinued). I never could take advantage of AudioBus on my iPad 2 and was always a bit frustrated by how much work it was to get this app to communicate with another. On the other hand, a Surface (or any higher-end PC laptop) would run my existing software. Decisions, decisions, decisions….

  • Pierre Fontaine

    Excellent timing for this article. I’m now contemplating purchasing a newer iPad to replace my iPad 2. I also do most of my work on PCs (rather than Macs) and have been curious about the Surface line as well (not that the RT line has been discontinued). I never could take advantage of AudioBus on my iPad 2 and was always a bit frustrated by how much work it was to get this app to communicate with another. On the other hand, a Surface (or any higher-end PC laptop) would run my existing software. Decisions, decisions, decisions….

  • I would like to raise a question mark about a different workflow approach with the iPad Pro in a music studio setting.

    For some time now, I’ve been dazzled with Stimming’s studio setup using a Wacom Cintiq 13″ on Cubase. Sometimes it’s seems to act a little buggy, and it’s not necessarily the most speed oriented workflow, but Stimming has a point: it’s sexy, and sometimes, we human beings need stupid things like that to feel engaged in the activity.

    I work on a strictly digital environment, and for that matter, I seek ways of turning my workflow more “hands-on”. I do not want to actually buy analog equipment, or have a bunch of dedicated midi controllers mapped for each plugin a use. As a digital musician, I use a lot of different stuff all the time, and I need to see the actual interface of the plugin/DAW to make sense of it since I’ve not necessarily mastered it on a point where I can ignore the screen. I also like to do a lot of automation and micro editing, and knobs don’t add much to that. A touchscreen with a pencil/stylus precise enough would actually help me a lot in that matter. 3D force touch and tilt precision would certainly count on something like that.

    The funny part is, the solution may not even come out as a music focused app. I just received an email from the developers of Air Display, and they said they’re very excited by the iPad Pro and already have planned a update for it, and this is what I needed to hear. I own an iPad Air 2, but still have quite figure it out a way to put it on a decent workflow. I tried everything, really. Even something with a lot potential as the Modstep seems to be still lacking something, and I think the iPad Pro would cover that.

    Anyway, that’s all hopes and dreams. I need to see it how it would work in reality, but something like Air Display looks very promising. What you guys think?

    P.S.: Some videos about Stimming’s workflow:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qCoMYk1NbE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YbNDtEcwKk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgb5sfDyLGA

    • Pierre Fontaine

      The biggest issue using a PC tablet for music is that the interface is always so damn small. I found I had to keep a bluetooth mouse handy just to get around my DAW’s interface. Having to use a mouse when I already have a touch screen is counter-productive. Granted, I could attach a monitor to my tablet PC but I like the idea of having a portable PC that can double as a tablet and as a full-PC if needed.

      I had hoped that by now software developers would have figured out a way to reconfigure the UI to work best within the tablet format (Sonar seems to be getting there). This is one area that Apple and the iPad got right. UI designed for a multi-touch screen is far different than using a UI that’s designed for a large monitor but can also work on a multi-touch screen.

      My ideal PC setup is something along the lines of Stimming’s…a touch screen tablet running my favorite DAW with VSTs that are designed like multi-touch apps found on the iPad. In other words, my VSTs would zoom up to full-screen when needed and minimized when not needed. This sort of environment could be the best of both worlds allowing pen input or multi-touch to be the most useful.

      • Polite Society

        I feel that. I bought a surface pro 1 for this reason, and it’s never really lived up to this potential. I recently gave in and got a 2nd hand ipad air, and it’s quickly becoming part of my live setup due to it’s swiss army knife abilities, form factor and battery life. Also keep being impressed with the music apps for iOS. I spent so long ignoring everything apple, that i had no idea how fertile the ground was.

    • Ashley Scott

      yes I used Tracktion & Maschine in this manner for a project last year (I was at a remote location for weeks with just a 13″ macbook screen) & air display on an ipad air – so it was as much to get a 2nd display as touch. It generally worked ok – but like PK notes in a comment above – it’s pretty disappointing with applications not designed for touch. I put it like that because some things are ‘so close’ to being usable via touch & others totally not. A good example is in Live: the looper effect multibutton is even sized correctly for a fingertip press but the channel faders don’t respond well at all.

      I have played a bit with Maschine & Ableton 9 on a Win7 tablet laptop & similar story – mixed good & bad – although using the stylus would put it on par with that Cintiq setup (plus it’s probably cheaper & more portable).

      – PS. if anyone wants me to try any touch compatibility stuff on this tablet, ask away.

  • I would like to raise a question mark about a different workflow approach with the iPad Pro in a music studio setting.

    For some time now, I’ve been dazzled with Stimming’s studio setup using a Wacom Cintiq 13″ on Cubase. Sometimes it’s seems to act a little buggy, and it’s not necessarily the most speed oriented workflow, but Stimming has a point: it’s sexy, and sometimes, we human beings need stupid things like that to feel engaged in the activity.

    I work on a strictly digital environment, and for that matter, I seek ways of turning my workflow more “hands-on”. I do not want to actually buy analog equipment, or have a bunch of dedicated midi controllers mapped for each plugin a use. As a digital musician, I use a lot of different stuff all the time, and I need to see the actual interface of the plugin/DAW to make sense of it since I’ve not necessarily mastered it on a point where I can ignore the screen. I also like to do a lot of automation and micro editing, and knobs don’t add much to that. A touchscreen with a pencil/stylus precise enough would actually help me a lot in that matter. 3D force touch and tilt precision would certainly count on something like that.

    The funny part is, the solution may not even come out as a music focused app. I just received an email from the developers of Air Display, and they said they’re very excited by the iPad Pro and already have planned a update for it, and this is what I needed to hear. I own an iPad Air 2, but still have quite figure it out a way to put it on a decent workflow. I tried everything, really. Even something with a lot potential as the Modstep seems to be still lacking something, and I think the iPad Pro would cover that.

    Anyway, that’s all hopes and dreams. I need to see it how it would work in reality, but something like Air Display looks very promising. What you guys think?

    P.S.: Some videos about Stimming’s workflow:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qCoMYk1NbE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YbNDtEcwKk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgb5sfDyLGA

    • Pierre Fontaine

      The biggest issue using a PC tablet for music is that the interface is always so damn small. I found I had to keep a bluetooth mouse handy just to get around my DAW’s interface. Having to use a mouse when I already have a touch screen is counter-productive. Granted, I could attach a monitor to my tablet PC but I like the idea of having a portable PC that can double as a tablet and as a full-PC if needed.

      I had hoped that by now software developers would have figured out a way to reconfigure the UI to work best within the tablet format (Sonar seems to be getting there). This is one area that Apple and the iPad got right. UI designed for a multi-touch screen is far different than using a UI that’s designed for a large monitor but can also work on a multi-touch screen.

      My ideal PC setup is something along the lines of Stimming’s…a touch screen tablet running my favorite DAW with VSTs that are designed like multi-touch apps found on the iPad. In other words, my VSTs would zoom up to full-screen when needed and minimized when not needed. This sort of environment could be the best of both worlds allowing pen input or multi-touch to be the most useful.

      • Polite Society

        I feel that. I bought a surface pro 1 for this reason, and it’s never really lived up to this potential. I recently gave in and got a 2nd hand ipad air, and it’s quickly becoming part of my live setup due to it’s swiss army knife abilities, form factor and battery life. Also keep being impressed with the music apps for iOS. I spent so long ignoring everything apple, that i had no idea how fertile the ground was.

    • Ashley Scott

      yes I used Tracktion & Maschine in this manner for a project last year (I was at a remote location for weeks with just a 13″ macbook screen) & air display on an ipad air – so it was as much to get a 2nd display as touch. It generally worked ok – but like PK notes in a comment above – it’s pretty disappointing with applications not designed for touch. I put it like that because some things are ‘so close’ to being usable via touch & others totally not. A good example is in Live: the looper effect multibutton is even sized correctly for a fingertip press but the channel faders don’t respond well at all.

      I have played a bit with Maschine & Ableton 9 on an HP tablet & similar story – mixed good & bad – although using the stylus would put it on par with that Cintiq setup (plus it’s probably cheaper & more portable).

      – PS. if anyone wants me to try any touch compatibility stuff on a WIn7 tablet, ask away.

  • I would like to raise a question mark about a different workflow approach with the iPad Pro in a music studio setting.

    For some time now, I’ve been dazzled with Stimming’s studio setup using a Wacom Cintiq 13″ on Cubase. Sometimes it’s seems to act a little buggy, and it’s not necessarily the most speed oriented workflow, but Stimming has a point: it’s sexy, and sometimes, we human beings need stupid things like that to feel engaged in the activity.

    I work on a strictly digital environment, and for that matter, I seek ways of turning my workflow more “hands-on”. I do not want to actually buy analog equipment, or have a bunch of dedicated midi controllers mapped for each plugin a use. As a digital musician, I use a lot of different stuff all the time, and I need to see the actual interface of the plugin/DAW to make sense of it since I’ve not necessarily mastered it on a point where I can ignore the screen. I also like to do a lot of automation and micro editing, and knobs don’t add much to that. A touchscreen with a pencil/stylus precise enough would actually help me a lot in that matter. 3D force touch and tilt precision would certainly count on something like that.

    The funny part is, the solution may not even come out as a music focused app. I just received an email from the developers of Air Display, and they said they’re very excited by the iPad Pro and already have planned a update for it, and this is what I needed to hear. I own an iPad Air 2, but still have quite figure it out a way to put it on a decent workflow. I tried everything, really. Even something with a lot potential as the Modstep seems to be still lacking something, and I think the iPad Pro would cover that.

    Anyway, that’s all hopes and dreams. I need to see it how it would work in reality, but something like Air Display looks very promising. What you guys think?

    P.S.: Some videos about Stimming’s workflow:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qCoMYk1NbE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YbNDtEcwKk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgb5sfDyLGA

    • Pierre Fontaine

      The biggest issue using a PC tablet for music is that the interface is always so damn small. I found I had to keep a bluetooth mouse handy just to get around my DAW’s interface. Having to use a mouse when I already have a touch screen is counter-productive. Granted, I could attach a monitor to my tablet PC but I like the idea of having a portable PC that can double as a tablet and as a full-PC if needed.

      I had hoped that by now software developers would have figured out a way to reconfigure the UI to work best within the tablet format (Sonar seems to be getting there). This is one area that Apple and the iPad got right. UI designed for a multi-touch screen is far different than using a UI that’s designed for a large monitor but can also work on a multi-touch screen.

      My ideal PC setup is something along the lines of Stimming’s…a touch screen tablet running my favorite DAW with VSTs that are designed like multi-touch apps found on the iPad. In other words, my VSTs would zoom up to full-screen when needed and minimized when not needed. This sort of environment could be the best of both worlds allowing pen input or multi-touch to be the most useful.

      • Polite Society

        I feel that. I bought a surface pro 1 for this reason, and it’s never really lived up to this potential. I recently gave in and got a 2nd hand ipad air, and it’s quickly becoming part of my live setup due to it’s swiss army knife abilities, form factor and battery life. Also keep being impressed with the music apps for iOS. I spent so long ignoring everything apple, that i had no idea how fertile the ground was.

    • Ashley Scott

      yes I used Tracktion & Maschine in this manner for a project last year (I was at a remote location for weeks with just a 13″ macbook screen) & air display on an ipad air – so it was as much to get a 2nd display as touch. It generally worked ok – but like PK notes in a comment above – it’s pretty disappointing with applications not designed for touch. I put it like that because some things are ‘so close’ to being usable via touch & others totally not. A good example is in Live: the looper effect multibutton is even sized correctly for a fingertip press but the channel faders don’t respond well at all.

      I have played a bit with Maschine & Ableton 9 on an HP tablet & similar story – mixed good & bad – although using the stylus would put it on par with that Cintiq setup (plus it’s probably cheaper & more portable).

      – PS. if anyone wants me to try any touch compatibility stuff on a WIn7 tablet, ask away.

  • Graham Metcalfe

    Nice overview. The larger screen size will definitely be a boon to performers using the iPad to display music. My iPad 3 combined with my present age does not allow me to have the iPad at the proper viewing distance on a music stand. Larger scree=larger notation. I think the workflow on the larger screen (and increased processing power) will also be beneficial for those who want to do everything “in the tablet.” Right now the 9.5″ screen feels really cramped for doing DAW work quickly.

    That being said, my next purchase in this price range is going to be a Sub37.

  • Graham Metcalfe

    Nice overview. The larger screen size will definitely be a boon to performers using the iPad to display music. My iPad 3 combined with my present age does not allow me to have the iPad at the proper viewing distance on a music stand. Larger scree=larger notation. I think the workflow on the larger screen (and increased processing power) will also be beneficial for those who want to do everything “in the tablet.” Right now the 9.5″ screen feels really cramped for doing DAW work quickly.

    That being said, my next purchase in this price range is going to be a Sub37.

  • Graham Metcalfe

    Nice overview. The larger screen size will definitely be a boon to performers using the iPad to display music. My iPad 3 combined with my present age does not allow me to have the iPad at the proper viewing distance on a music stand. Larger scree=larger notation. I think the workflow on the larger screen (and increased processing power) will also be beneficial for those who want to do everything “in the tablet.” Right now the 9.5″ screen feels really cramped for doing DAW work quickly.

    That being said, my next purchase in this price range is going to be a Sub37.

  • FabriciusRex

    I feel that Microsoft is doing a really good thing with its Surface lineup. They have succesfully managed to consolidate two types of devices into one. The Pro 3 made a real spalsh and the hype for the Pro 4 has been doing laps around the web for some time. So, I don’t get why you Apple buyers would settle for less. You should demand a fully specced tablet with OS X for maximum productivity.

    • I don’t think it’s really possible to “demand” anything of Apple. 😉

      I’m still not convinced, anyway. I like the Surface, but you really do design around touch differently than you do trackpad/mouse/keyboard metaphors. So I don’t see that as particularly maximizing my productivity. That’s not a Mac vs. Windows argument, either – I mean, I am still yet to be convinced touch will greatly increase my Windows productivity.

      Now, if that Surface can get some more dedicated touch apps, I’m interested – not because it really consolidates the two devices, but because it means I can get two devices in one.

      • FabriciusRex

        I wouldn’t konw much about using touch tablets. My totaly hours spent on one can be counted on one hand. I actually don’t see me doing much of my music tinker with it. For taking notes and aiding me in my software engineering classes. That I can see it do well.

        As for Apple. I do feel that merging ios and osx will be inevitable at one point. What’s the alternative? Running two parallell OS that for every itiration will be more alike? Micorsoft did the smart move and scrapped thier Windows RT (the smartest would have been not to develop it in the first place! Microsoft under Steve Ballmer was a joke. Finally they are getting things right.). They are making a very smart move with their universal app strategy. And of course unifying all their devices under one OS.

        I don’t care what OS people run. If you like Apple thats fine. Or Microsoft, fine. Or any other for that matter. What I do care about is the big tech companies coming up with new invovations and pushing each other to do better. And thats what I am seeing here. I don’t mind microsoft copying apple as long as I, the user, get a better experience. Or the other way around. It’s a win-win, really.

    • MicHaeL

      I feel the same about Microsoft’s Surface. I mean, I’m by no means for Apple per se, because it has always been too “boutique” for me and the only reason I have an iPad (“3”) is because I won it in a lottery. Even after all the use (AND frustration) I’ve gotten out of it I wouldn’t put the money of the retail-price towards it.
      But the Surface, on the other hand, even though it’s also costly, seems to have been more of a laptop-replacement than any iPad has been (up until the “Pro”, maybe). Because, other than the specifications, it was both designed with a keyboard-attachment and also the Windows-OS in mind. And of course since Apple has been so stubborn to keep their OS closed, it’s not very open to customization and pairing up with other devices such as your PC (unless you also buy an overpriced Mac, maybe).

      It seems that it gets closer and closer to the point that you can just get a trio of a Windows-PC, a Microsoft Surface, and a Microsoft/Windows-phone, and be on your merry way. Especially since (I believe) in Windows 10 there is or will be some sort of “app store” that will be selling software and of course will be pretty much like iTunes or the Apple App Store of course, allowing Microsoft/Windows to tap more into the mobile world.
      Until that happens, I wouldn’t be getting a Surface, but if developers are putting their apps on there I would definitely like to move over to what is basically a Windows-tablet/laptop.

      Again, I like my iPad, it has been quite useful and productive, but the pretentiousness of Apple definitely just seeps out of their hardware and software. And to think that their overdue features, such as multitasking (which I’ve been doing on computers since the ’90s!), won’t come to the iPad 3rd generation. That’s just great! And it would’ve been perfect if I had actually spent the hundreds of Dollars that this thing normally costs. -_- And I sure won’t be spending that on a newer iPad any time soon, I might as well go with a Microsoft/Windows-device for the money, especially if I can use it as a laptop and (again) if there will be the same or similar apps for it.

      Just saying; Apple pretends they’re so ahead of time, but they’ve just been ahead on the market, while now other companies are passing them by.

  • FabriciusRex

    I feel that Microsoft is doing a really good thing with its Surface lineup. They have succesfully managed to consolidate two types of devices into one. The Pro 3 made a real spalsh and the hype for the Pro 4 has been doing laps around the web for some time. So, I don’t get why you Apple buyers would settle for less. You should demand a fully specced tablet with OS X for maximum productivity.

    • I don’t think it’s really possible to “demand” anything of Apple. 😉

      I’m still not convinced, anyway. I like the Surface, but you really do design around touch differently than you do trackpad/mouse/keyboard metaphors. So I don’t see that as particularly maximizing my productivity. That’s not a Mac vs. Windows argument, either – I mean, I am still yet to be convinced touch will greatly increase my Windows productivity.

      Now, if that Surface can get some more dedicated touch apps, I’m interested – not because it really consolidates the two devices, but because it means I can get two devices in one.

      • FabriciusRex

        I wouldn’t konw much about using touch tablets. My totaly hours spent on one can be counted on one hand. I actually don’t see me doing much of my music tinker with it. For taking notes and aiding me in my software engineering classes. That I can see it do well.

        As for Apple. I do feel that merging ios and osx will be inevitable at one point. What’s the alternative? Running two parallell OS that for every itiration will be more alike? Micorsoft did the smart move and scrapped thier Windows RT (the smartest would have been not to develop it in the first place! Microsoft under Steve Ballmer was a joke. Finally they are getting things right.). They are making a very smart move with their universal app strategy. And of course unifying all their devices under one OS.

        I don’t care what OS people run. If you like Apple thats fine. Or Microsoft, fine. Or any other for that matter. What I do care about is the big tech companies coming up with new invovations and pushing each other to do better. And thats what I am seeing here. I don’t mind microsoft copying apple as long as I, the user, get a better experience. Or the other way around. It’s a win-win, really.

    • MicHaeL

      I feel the same about Microsoft’s Surface. I mean, I’m by no means for Apple per se, because it has always been too “boutique” for me and the only reason I have an iPad (“3”) is because I won it in a lottery. Even after all the use (AND frustration) I’ve gotten out of it I wouldn’t put the money of the retail-price towards it.
      But the Surface, on the other hand, even though it’s also costly, seems to have been more of a laptop-replacement than any iPad has been (up until the “Pro”, maybe). Because, other than the specifications, it was both designed with a keyboard-attachment and also the Windows-OS in mind. And of course since Apple has been so stubborn to keep their OS closed, it’s not very open to customization and pairing up with other devices such as your PC (unless you also buy an overpriced Mac, maybe).

      It seems that it gets closer and closer to the point that you can just get a trio of a Windows-PC, a Microsoft Surface, and a Microsoft/Windows-phone, and be on your merry way. Especially since (I believe) in Windows 10 there is or will be some sort of “app store” that will be selling software and of course will be pretty much like iTunes or the Apple App Store of course, allowing Microsoft/Windows to tap more into the mobile world.
      Until that happens, I wouldn’t be getting a Surface, but if developers are putting their apps on there I would definitely like to move over to what is basically a Windows-tablet/laptop.

      Again, I like my iPad, it has been quite useful and productive, but the pretentiousness of Apple definitely just seeps out of their hardware and software. And to think that their overdue features, such as multitasking (which we’ve been doing on computers for decades), won’t come to the iPad 3rd generation. That’s just great! And it would’ve been perfect if I had actually spent the hundreds of Dollars that this thing normally costs. -_- And I sure won’t be spending that on a newer iPad any time soon, I might as well go with a Microsoft/Windows-device for the money, especially if I can use it as a laptop and (again) if there will be the same or similar apps for it.

      Just saying; Apple pretends they’re so ahead of time, but they’ve just been ahead on the market, while now other companies are passing them by.

  • FabriciusRex

    I feel that Microsoft is doing a really good thing with its Surface lineup. They have succesfully managed to consolidate two types of devices into one. The Pro 3 made a real spalsh and the hype for the Pro 4 has been doing laps around the web for some time. So, I don’t get why you Apple buyers would settle for less. You should demand a fully specced tablet with OS X for maximum productivity.

    • I don’t think it’s really possible to “demand” anything of Apple. 😉

      I’m still not convinced, anyway. I like the Surface, but you really do design around touch differently than you do trackpad/mouse/keyboard metaphors. So I don’t see that as particularly maximizing my productivity. That’s not a Mac vs. Windows argument, either – I mean, I am still yet to be convinced touch will greatly increase my Windows productivity.

      Now, if that Surface can get some more dedicated touch apps, I’m interested – not because it really consolidates the two devices, but because it means I can get two devices in one.

      • FabriciusRex

        I wouldn’t konw much about using touch tablets. My totaly hours spent on one can be counted on one hand. I actually don’t see me doing much of my music tinker with it. For taking notes and aiding me in my software engineering classes. That I can see it do well.

        As for Apple. I do feel that merging ios and osx will be inevitable at one point. What’s the alternative? Running two parallell OS that for every itiration will be more alike? Micorsoft did the smart move and scrapped thier Windows RT (the smartest would have been not to develop it in the first place! Microsoft under Steve Ballmer was a joke. Finally they are getting things right.). They are making a very smart move with their universal app strategy. And of course unifying all their devices under one OS.

        I don’t care what OS people run. If you like Apple thats fine. Or Microsoft, fine. Or any other for that matter. What I do care about is the big tech companies coming up with new invovations and pushing each other to do better. And thats what I am seeing here. I don’t mind microsoft copying apple as long as I, the user, get a better experience. Or the other way around. It’s a win-win, really.

    • MicHaeL

      I feel the same about Microsoft’s Surface. I mean, I’m by no means for Apple per se, because it has always been too “boutique” for me and the only reason I have an iPad (“3”) is because I won it in a lottery. Even after all the use (AND frustration) I’ve gotten out of it I wouldn’t put the money of the retail-price towards it.
      But the Surface, on the other hand, even though it’s also costly, seems to have been more of a laptop-replacement than any iPad has been (up until the “Pro”, maybe). Because, other than the specifications, it was both designed with a keyboard-attachment and also the Windows-OS in mind. And of course since Apple has been so stubborn to keep their OS closed, it’s not very open to customization and pairing up with other devices such as your PC (unless you also buy an overpriced Mac, maybe).

      It seems that it gets closer and closer to the point that you can just get a trio of a Windows-PC, a Microsoft Surface, and a Microsoft/Windows-phone, and be on your merry way. Especially since (I believe) in Windows 10 there is or will be some sort of “app store” that will be selling software and of course will be pretty much like iTunes or the Apple App Store of course, allowing Microsoft/Windows to tap more into the mobile world.
      Until that happens, I wouldn’t be getting a Surface, but if developers are putting their apps on there I would definitely like to move over to what is basically a Windows-tablet/laptop.

      Again, I like my iPad, it has been quite useful and productive, but the pretentiousness of Apple definitely just seeps out of their hardware and software. And to think that their overdue features, such as multitasking (which we’ve been doing on computers for decades), won’t come to the iPad 3rd generation. That’s just great! And it would’ve been perfect if I had actually spent the hundreds of Dollars that this thing normally costs. -_- And I sure won’t be spending that on a newer iPad any time soon, I might as well go with a Microsoft/Windows-device for the money, especially if I can use it as a laptop and (again) if there will be the same or similar apps for it.

      Just saying; Apple pretends they’re so ahead of time, but they’ve just been ahead on the market, while now other companies are passing them by.

  • Matt Leaf

    Definately not interested. But for those working with an ipad already in a major way, its going to be a no brainer, for say, working on stage.

    But its hard for me not to feel Apple is trailing now. The iPad Pro would have been much more compelling if it ran a hyrbrid iOS / OSX system, giving you the power of both touch and a full blown OS. Perhaps they’ll do it yet, after all, they backtracked on bigger iphones, smaller ipads and now a stylus. So cmon guys backtrack on a hybrid OS. Then it really would eat my Macbook Air for lunch. But theyre smart, Apple. Theyre waiting. Waiting for a product to die. A good product idea is only worth implementing if it doesnt make you less money. It might be a great idea, and sell brilliantly, but it also might make people stop buying the thing it kills.

    Its a tough balance, but i think the iPad Pro had the chance to be that moment, and they didn’t sieze on the opportunity.

    iX OS?

    The MacPad?

    It’ll come soon enough.

    • foljs

      “””But its hard for me not to feel Apple is trailing now. The iPad Pro would have been much more compelling if it ran a hyrbrid iOS / OSX system, giving you the power of both touch and a full blown OS.”””

      The OSX UI is not designed for touch as the primary method of input.

      So running Logic or Word or anything from OS X as is in a tablet would be a subpar experience. MS lets you do that with the Surface, and it’s awful from a usability point of view.

      iOS already is the hybrid iOS/OSX you mention: it’s a version of OS X (same OS, just different facade) made for touch devices.

      So what it needs is just CPUs to reach parity with desktop CPUs (which is near close) and special apps to be designed with touch in mind (Logic Touch, Cubase (not Cubasis) touch, etc).

  • Matt Leaf

    Definately not interested. But for those working with an ipad already in a major way, its going to be a no brainer, for say, working on stage.

    But its hard for me not to feel Apple is trailing now. The iPad Pro would have been much more compelling if it ran a hyrbrid iOS / OSX system, giving you the power of both touch and a full blown OS. Perhaps they’ll do it yet, after all, they backtracked on bigger iphones, smaller ipads and now a stylus. So cmon guys backtrack on a hybrid OS. Then it really would eat my Macbook Air for lunch. But theyre smart, Apple. Theyre waiting. Waiting for a product to die. A good product idea is only worth implementing if it doesnt make you less money. It might be a great idea, and sell brilliantly, but it also might make people stop buying the thing it kills.

    Its a tough balance, but i think the iPad Pro had the chance to be that moment, and they didn’t sieze on the opportunity.

    iX OS?

    The MacPad?

    It’ll come soon enough.

    • foljs

      “””But its hard for me not to feel Apple is trailing now. The iPad Pro would have been much more compelling if it ran a hyrbrid iOS / OSX system, giving you the power of both touch and a full blown OS.”””

      The OSX UI is not designed for touch as the primary method of input.

      So running Logic or Word or anything from OS X as is in a tablet would be a subpar experience. MS lets you do that with the Surface, and it’s awful from a usability point of view.

      iOS already is the hybrid iOS/OSX you mention: it’s a version of OS X (same OS, just different facade) made for touch devices.

      So what it needs is just CPUs to reach parity with desktop CPUs (which is near close) and special apps to be designed with touch in mind (Logic Touch, Cubase (not Cubasis) touch, etc).

  • Matt Leaf

    Definately not interested. But for those working with an ipad already in a major way, its going to be a no brainer, for say, working on stage.

    But its hard for me not to feel Apple is trailing now. The iPad Pro would have been much more compelling if it ran a hyrbrid iOS / OSX system, giving you the power of both touch and a full blown OS. Perhaps they’ll do it yet, after all, they backtracked on bigger iphones, smaller ipads and now a stylus. So cmon guys backtrack on a hybrid OS. Then it really would eat my Macbook Air for lunch. But theyre smart, Apple. Theyre waiting. Waiting for a product to die. A good product idea is only worth implementing if it doesnt make you less money. It might be a great idea, and sell brilliantly, but it also might make people stop buying the thing it kills.

    Its a tough balance, but i think the iPad Pro had the chance to be that moment, and they didn’t sieze on the opportunity.

    iX OS?

    The MacPad?

    It’ll come soon enough.

    • foljs

      “””But its hard for me not to feel Apple is trailing now. The iPad Pro would have been much more compelling if it ran a hyrbrid iOS / OSX system, giving you the power of both touch and a full blown OS.”””

      The OSX UI is not designed for touch as the primary method of input.

      So running Logic or Word or anything from OS X as is in a tablet would be a subpar experience. MS lets you do that with the Surface, and it’s awful from a usability point of view.

      iOS already is the hybrid iOS/OSX you mention: it’s a version of OS X (same OS, just different facade) made for touch devices.

      So what it needs is just CPUs to reach parity with desktop CPUs (which is near close) and special apps to be designed with touch in mind (Logic Touch, Cubase (not Cubasis) touch, etc).

  • heinrichz

    Having a larger screen and fast processing will definitely be the tipping point for me to start integrating the many great synths i already have (and rarely use) for ios into my computer setup. However at this price point i feel like waiting for the next Pro that probaly will integrate the 3D touch feature.
    I also think 64gb would be my only option for professional use in the studio.
    I might get the new Air in the meantime to have less latency with my iconnect midi, the older ipads indeed are not usable with midi and audio io at the same time due to the latency..or am i missing something here ? My iphone 6 plus is really tight in that regard so i assume it must be due to the 64 bit processing.

  • heinrichz

    Having a larger screen and fast processing will definitely be the tipping point for me to start integrating the many great synths i already have (and rarely use) for ios into my computer setup. However at this price point i feel like waiting for the next Pro that probaly will integrate the 3D touch feature.
    I also think 64gb would be my only option for professional use in the studio.
    I might get the new Air in the meantime to have less latency with my iconnect midi, the older ipads indeed are not usable with midi and audio io at the same time due to the latency..or am i missing something here ? My iphone 6 plus is really tight in that regard so i assume it must be due to the 64 bit processing.

  • heinrichz

    Having a larger screen and fast processing will definitely be the tipping point for me to start integrating the many great synths i already have (and rarely use) for ios into my computer setup. However at this price point i feel like waiting for the next Pro that probaly will integrate the 3D touch feature.
    I also think 64gb would be my only option for professional use in the studio.
    I might get the new Air in the meantime to have less latency with my iconnect midi, the older ipads indeed are not usable with midi and audio io at the same time due to the latency..or am i missing something here ? My iphone 6 plus is really tight in that regard so i assume it must be due to the 64 bit processing.

  • Polite Society

    Do you really need more than 16gig to use an iPad for music? Assuming you don’t need a music collection on the device for DJing (actually, speaking of that, is there a way to use usb sticks with iOS?) surely a majority of music apps don’t require that much space (bare with me, i’m a newbie to the ios universe).

    • Roikat

      If you’re an app junkie like me, you’ve got more than 64 GB of apps and have to delete them all the time to make room for data. Many audio apps have a gigabyte or two of sample library coming along for the ride.

      I can see a use to the 16 GB models for kiosks or dedicated single-use applications, but there are so many interesting iOS music apps (even for free) that one is likely to feel constrained by the smaller memory capacities. I bet Apple sells many more iPad Pros in the maximum memory configuration than the entry unit.

      • Polite Society

        Typically after getting home, I checked the usage on my 16gig iPad and realised I’ve already almost maxed it out. sigh 😛 Those apps are like crack.

    • Joe Belknap Wall

      16 GB is fine for me. In my case, having mountains of apps just means have a shallow understanding of a whole bunch of apps instead of expert control over a core collection.

      • Polite Society

        I think it’s a pokemon kind of situation, even though you have a core team of effective tools, which you occasionally swap in or out, you must have them all. *shakes with need*

  • Polite Society

    Do you really need more than 16gig to use an iPad for music? Assuming you don’t need a music collection on the device for DJing (actually, speaking of that, is there a way to use usb sticks with iOS?) surely a majority of music apps don’t require that much space (bare with me, i’m a newbie to the ios universe).

    • Roikat

      If you’re an app junkie like me, you’ve got more than 64 GB of apps and have to delete them all the time to make room for data. Many audio apps have a gigabyte or two of sample library coming along for the ride.

      I can see a use to the 16 GB models for kiosks or dedicated single-use applications, but there are so many interesting iOS music apps (even for free) that one is likely to feel constrained by the smaller memory capacities. I bet Apple sells many more iPad Pros in the maximum memory configuration than the entry unit.

      • Polite Society

        Typically after getting home, I checked the usage on my 16gig iPad and realised I’ve already almost maxed it out. sigh 😛 Those apps are like crack.

    • Joe Belknap Wall

      16 GB is fine for me. In my case, having mountains of apps just means have a shallow understanding of a whole bunch of apps instead of expert control over a core collection.

      • Polite Society

        I think it’s a pokemon kind of situation, even though you have a core team of effective tools, which you occasionally swap in or out, you must have them all. *shakes with need*

  • Polite Society

    Do you really need more than 16gig to use an iPad for music? Assuming you don’t need a music collection on the device for DJing (actually, speaking of that, is there a way to use usb sticks with iOS?) surely a majority of music apps don’t require that much space (bare with me, i’m a newbie to the ios universe).

    • Roikat

      If you’re an app junkie like me, you’ve got more than 64 GB of apps and have to delete them all the time to make room for data. Many audio apps have a gigabyte or two of sample library coming along for the ride.

      I can see a use to the 16 GB models for kiosks or dedicated single-use applications, but there are so many interesting iOS music apps (even for free) that one is likely to feel constrained by the smaller memory capacities. I bet Apple sells many more iPad Pros in the maximum memory configuration than the entry unit.

      • Polite Society

        Typically after getting home, I checked the usage on my 16gig iPad and realised I’ve already almost maxed it out. sigh 😛 Those apps are like crack.

    • Joe Belknap Wall

      16 GB is fine for me. In my case, having mountains of apps just means have a shallow understanding of a whole bunch of apps instead of expert control over a core collection.

      • Polite Society

        I think it’s a pokemon kind of situation, even though you have a core team of effective tools, which you occasionally swap in or out, you must have them all. *shakes with need*

  • robleks

    The Ipad Pro looks kinda cool, but it all comes down to the number of good apps that will support it in a useful way. I’m not buying this thing to run bigger versions of the same apps we already have on the other ipads.

    As for the “pro” in the name. I don’t think this device is made for real pros. It runs none of the applications pros uses on a daily basis – like full photoshop (not the limited ios version). IOS still seems way too sandboxed to work in a professional situation (no file browser for instance). I see this more as a hobbyist device.

  • robleks

    The Ipad Pro looks kinda cool, but it all comes down to the number of good apps that will support it in a useful way. I’m not buying this thing to run scaled up versions of the same apps we already have on the other ipads.

    As for the “pro” in the name. I don’t think this device is made for real pros. IOS still seems way too sandboxed to work in a professional situation (no file browser for instance). I see this more as a hobbyist device.

    But things will change. Perhaps what Apple is really doing is, little by little, scaling IOS up so as to eventually replace OS X (going in the opposite direction compared to Microsoft, but ending up in basically the same place).

  • robleks

    The Ipad Pro looks kinda cool, but it all comes down to the number of good apps that will support it in a useful way. I’m not buying this thing to run scaled up versions of the same apps we already have on the other ipads.

    As for the “pro” in the name. I don’t think this device is made for real pros. IOS still seems way too sandboxed to work in a professional situation (no file browser for instance). I see this more as a hobbyist device.

    But things will change. Perhaps what Apple is really doing is, little by little, scaling IOS up so as to eventually replace OS X (going in the opposite direction compared to Microsoft, but ending up in basically the same place).

  • Phil

    I jumped into iOS music app since 8 month now. I work on iPad air 2, Live & Logic on Mac os also. I love the work flow. I spend about 5 hours on tablet each day (I’m producing House Music). My number one app is Korg Gadget (not perfect, but I love it), doing some raw track that I transfer to Ableton (free live jam) and logic (from Live, I do edit and pre-mastering).

    Then, I will do the iPad pro switch, but probably wait for the version 2.

    I don’t care about OsX on iPad, the only missing capability is the file management … I’m using audiocopy and Dropbox for that, but it’s not very easy and confortable.

    As I spend some hours on the apple tablet, there are another pain in the ass problems.
    When I put the iPad on the desk, it is going to hurt my neck quickly because the curve position of my body. If I put the tablet vertically on the desk … it’s the same trouble. And it’s not possible to stand up it on high dock, because my hand is going to be tired after some hours … believe me, 5 hours or more each day … sometimes it’s hard and it’s necessary to continu the job on the mac.

    And the number one trouble about the iPad with professional production is the 16bit export file. I’m need 24 bit export or more… :/

    And the other annoying things is about the capability to charge the device while some controller or sound card are connected (the music app are killing the battery very quickly).

    But I continu on it and love it 🙂

  • Phil

    I jumped into iOS music app since 8 month now. I work on iPad air 2, Live & Logic on Mac os also. I love the work flow. I spend about 5 hours on tablet each day (I’m producing House Music). My number one app is Korg Gadget (not perfect, but I love it), doing some raw track that I transfer to Ableton (free live jam) and logic (from Live, I do edit and pre-mastering).

    Then, I will do the iPad pro switch, but probably wait for the version 2.

    I don’t care about OsX on iPad, the only missing capability is the file management … I’m using audiocopy and Dropbox for that, but it’s not very easy and confortable.

    As I spend some hours on the apple tablet, there are another pain in the ass problems.
    When I put the iPad on the desk, it is going to hurt my neck quickly because the curve position of my body. If I put the tablet vertically on the desk … it’s the same trouble. And it’s not possible to stand up it on high dock, because my hand is going to be tired after some hours … believe me, 5 hours or more each day … sometimes it’s hard and it’s necessary to continu the job on the mac.

    And the number one trouble about the iPad with professional production is the 16bit export file. I’m need 24 bit export or more… :/

    And the other annoying things is about the capability to charge the device while some controller or sound card are connected (the music app are killing the battery very quickly).

    But I continu on it and love it 🙂

  • Phil

    I jumped into iOS music app since 8 month now. I work on iPad air 2, Live & Logic on Mac os also. I love the work flow. I spend about 5 hours on tablet each day (I’m producing House Music). My number one app is Korg Gadget (not perfect, but I love it), doing some raw track that I transfer to Ableton (free live jam) and logic (from Live, I do edit and pre-mastering).

    Then, I will do the iPad pro switch, but probably wait for the version 2.

    I don’t care about OsX on iPad, the only missing capability is the file management … I’m using audiocopy and Dropbox for that, but it’s not very easy and confortable.

    As I spend some hours on the apple tablet, there are another pain in the ass problems.
    When I put the iPad on the desk, it is going to hurt my neck quickly because the curve position of my body. If I put the tablet vertically on the desk … it’s the same trouble. And it’s not possible to stand up it on high dock, because my hand is going to be tired after some hours … believe me, 5 hours or more each day … sometimes it’s hard and it’s necessary to continu the job on the mac.

    And the number one trouble about the iPad with professional production is the 16bit export file. I’m need 24 bit export or more… :/

    And the other annoying things is about the capability to charge the device while some controller or sound card are connected (the music app are killing the battery very quickly).

    But I continu on it and love it 🙂

  • Mactley

    No mention of 3D touch? Once music apps are able to take advantage of the pressure sensors, this could be huge!

  • Mactley

    No mention of 3D touch? Once music apps are able to take advantage of the pressure sensors, this could be huge!

  • Mactley

    No mention of 3D touch? Once music apps are able to take advantage of the pressure sensors, this could be huge!

  • Roikat

    The “Pro” branding intimates that Logic and Final Cut for iOS may be just around the corner, possibly made to only work at the resolution of the iPad Pro. That’s how Apple rolls, in my experience.

  • Roikat

    The “Pro” branding intimates that Logic and Final Cut for iOS may be just around the corner, possibly made to only work at the resolution of the iPad Pro. That’s how Apple rolls, in my experience.

  • Roikat

    The “Pro” branding intimates that Logic and Final Cut for iOS may be just around the corner, possibly made to only work at the resolution of the iPad Pro. That’s how Apple rolls, in my experience.

  • MikeKSmith

    If your regression line of speed vs cost is right, then it suggests that you might pay *something* for *no* speed. Surely some mistake…

  • MikeKSmith

    If your regression line of speed vs cost is right, then it suggests that you might pay *something* for *no* speed. Surely some mistake…

  • MikeKSmith

    If your regression line of speed vs cost is right, then it suggests that you might pay *something* for *no* speed. Surely some mistake…

  • Freeks

    No idea why they call it iPad Pro. It’s just bigger. Same like they would have called iPhone 6+ iPhone Pro as it’s bigger and faster.

    I’m a happy iPad 1 user. I have been waiting the big screen version before i update. Just faster CPU is not enough. All controller apps run just fine with it and making music with it is PITA with even iPad Air 🙂 It runs all audio apps that i want. No idea why i would need more than 16gb as apps that i use take maybe 6gb in total.

    So not gonna update quite yet. I’m gonna wait iPad Pro Air 2 that will come out next year. It will not run PRO OS, but that’s what we just need to live with. So no Bitwig for iPad 🙁

    I don’t even want full OSX but pro version of iOS. Proper, real multi-tasking where i can choose how i split the screen with the apps. 12.9″ is well enough to display multiple apps or part of the apps at the same time.

  • Freeks

    No idea why they call it iPad Pro. It’s just bigger. Same like they would have called iPhone 6+ iPhone Pro as it’s bigger and faster.

    I’m a happy iPad 1 user. I have been waiting the big screen version before i update. Just faster CPU is not enough. All controller apps run just fine with it and making music with it is PITA with even iPad Air 🙂 It runs all audio apps that i want. No idea why i would need more than 16gb as apps that i use take maybe 6gb in total.

    So not gonna update quite yet. I’m gonna wait iPad Pro Air 2 that will come out next year. It will not run PRO OS, but that’s what we just need to live with. So no Bitwig for iPad 🙁

    I don’t even want full OSX but pro version of iOS. Proper, real multi-tasking where i can choose how i split the screen with the apps. 12.9″ is well enough to display multiple apps or part of the apps at the same time.

  • Freeks

    No idea why they call it iPad Pro. It’s just bigger. Same like they would have called iPhone 6+ iPhone Pro as it’s bigger and faster.

    I’m a happy iPad 1 user. I have been waiting the big screen version before i update. Just faster CPU is not enough. All controller apps run just fine with it and making music with it is PITA with even iPad Air 🙂 It runs all audio apps that i want. No idea why i would need more than 16gb as apps that i use take maybe 6gb in total.

    So not gonna update quite yet. I’m gonna wait iPad Pro Air 2 that will come out next year. It will not run PRO OS, but that’s what we just need to live with. So no Bitwig for iPad 🙁

    I don’t even want full OSX but pro version of iOS. Proper, real multi-tasking where i can choose how i split the screen with the apps. 12.9″ is well enough to display multiple apps or part of the apps at the same time.

  • Joe Belknap Wall

    After doing several successful sets at the Electro-Music 2015 conference/retreat in upstate NY last weekend using an iPad Mini 2 brilliantly running a chain of applications and Lemur running on a 4G iPod Touch and a 1G iPad, I rewarded myself this week with a shiny new iPad Nano, aka the 6G iPod Touch.

    Having a complete rig of synths, effects, and DAW/loopers that fits in a pocket, and which works gloriously well with class-compliant USB MIDI/audio devices on a powered hub, is my killer app for live music. So when I need to pack up a selection of gear that would have filled my trunk in my early days and fly to a gig, I’ve got a rig that doesn’t even take up more than half of my carry-on bag.

    Apple is missing a trick by not rebranding the A8-powered iPod Touch as an iPad Nano, because it’s the same environment, same capabilities, and same expanding, innovative, great-sound musical ecosystem, but more wee.

  • Joe Belknap Wall

    After doing several successful sets at the Electro-Music 2015 conference/retreat in upstate NY last weekend using an iPad Mini 2 brilliantly running a chain of applications and Lemur running on a 4G iPod Touch and a 1G iPad, I rewarded myself this week with a shiny new iPad Nano, aka the 6G iPod Touch.

    Having a complete rig of synths, effects, and DAW/loopers that fits in a pocket, and which works gloriously well with class-compliant USB MIDI/audio devices on a powered hub, is my killer app for live music. So when I need to pack up a selection of gear that would have filled my trunk in my early days and fly to a gig, I’ve got a rig that doesn’t even take up more than half of my carry-on bag.

    Apple is missing a trick by not rebranding the A8-powered iPod Touch as an iPad Nano, because it’s the same environment, same capabilities, and same expanding, innovative, great-sound musical ecosystem, but more wee.

  • Joe Belknap Wall

    After doing several successful sets at the Electro-Music 2015 conference/retreat in upstate NY last weekend using an iPad Mini 2 brilliantly running a chain of applications and Lemur running on a 4G iPod Touch and a 1G iPad, I rewarded myself this week with a shiny new iPad Nano, aka the 6G iPod Touch.

    Having a complete rig of synths, effects, and DAW/loopers that fits in a pocket, and which works gloriously well with class-compliant USB MIDI/audio devices on a powered hub, is my killer app for live music. So when I need to pack up a selection of gear that would have filled my trunk in my early days and fly to a gig, I’ve got a rig that doesn’t even take up more than half of my carry-on bag.

    Apple is missing a trick by not rebranding the A8-powered iPod Touch as an iPad Nano, because it’s the same environment, same capabilities, and same expanding, innovative, great-sound musical ecosystem, but more wee.

  • Mark McKee

    I go quite a ways back with both Apple & MS. I had access to the first Mac delivered to ABQ, as well as the first PC clones from Compaq, and I worked closely with Xerox software that ran off the legendary GUI that Xerox gave to Apple…and MS. Having been there, I’m familiar with the street myths from all the platforms, over the years, and so I thought it might be helpful for you to hear some truths right now. You can simply choose to laugh, I’m quite prepared for that eventuality, as George Harrison would say, but I’ve come to believe the tech press has replaced rock journalism in our society.(see Zappa quote on r.j.) In the days of the mainframes, there were the “high priests”, who became “DOS experts” in the 90s and have today become “Linux fanbois”. It’s all the same guys, regurgitating myths, with impressive sounding authority, but I would like to dispel a few right here. First off, Windows 10 is WAY more stable that Win 7, even in it’s first iteration. The “experts” don’t really know technically how windows works, not because its a big secret, but because it is work to read the MSs voluminous documentation. These same guys kept up the myth that games ran better on DOS than windows for almost a decade. It was never true. Sure, Windows 10 is spying on you, just as NASA is spying on the mars rovers. It’s called telemetry. The experts don’t understand the background processes so they cry spying, and would like to keep us on Win 7 until 2020, which is sad because Active Directory is much easier to connect and maintain on a modern OS. Also, a fully loaded surface pro 3, with all the extras, including a 6TB external, docking station, keyboard cover, etc. comes to around $2500. It is more powerful than the average desktop, and runs Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium. This means that it not only can replace a laptop and table, but also the desktop as well. One final note on Windows that NEVER gets mentioned. Windows is the undisputed King of legacy apps, and Win 10 made it even easier. I have favorite little music apps, really cheesy, but superior to modern apps for that little simple piece of my production chain. One came out under Win 3.1, and 2 are from Win 95 days. They both run better than ever on Win 10. Also, I can run a DAW from 10 years ago, that barely ran when it came out, cough, like EVERY DAW that comes out, and get speed and rock solid performance on newer equipment. I just wanted to clear up those Windows myths, because they persist in academia, much longer. (for some reason). I’m also really liking some of the new directions Apple is taking, and thanks CK, for this great and informative article on the new Apple lineup. No matter the platform, creating digital music is a very worthwhile human endeavor. thx for all you do!!!

  • Mark McKee

    I go quite a ways back with both Apple & MS. I had access to the first Mac delivered to ABQ, as well as the first PC clones from Compaq, and I worked closely with Xerox software that ran off the legendary GUI that Xerox gave to Apple…and MS. Having been there, I’m familiar with the street myths from all the platforms, over the years, and so I thought it might be helpful for you to hear some truths right now. You can simply choose to laugh, I’m quite prepared for that eventuality, as George Harrison would say, but I’ve come to believe the tech press has replaced rock journalism in our society.(see Zappa quote on r.j.) In the days of the mainframes, there were the “high priests”, who became “DOS experts” in the 90s and have today become “Linux fanbois”. It’s all the same guys, regurgitating myths, with impressive sounding authority, but I would like to dispel a few right here. First off, Windows 10 is WAY more stable that Win 7, even in it’s first iteration. The “experts” don’t really know technically how windows works, not because its a big secret, but because it is work to read the MSs voluminous documentation. These same guys kept up the myth that games ran better on DOS than windows for almost a decade. It was never true. Sure, Windows 10 is spying on you, just as NASA is spying on the mars rovers. It’s called telemetry. The experts don’t understand the background processes so they cry spying, and would like to keep us on Win 7 until 2020, which is sad because Active Directory is much easier to connect and maintain on a modern OS. Also, a fully loaded surface pro 3, with all the extras, including a 6TB external, docking station, keyboard cover, etc. comes to around $2500. It is more powerful than the average desktop, and runs Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium. This means that it not only can replace a laptop and table, but also the desktop as well. One final note on Windows that NEVER gets mentioned. Windows is the undisputed King of legacy apps, and Win 10 made it even easier. I have favorite little music apps, really cheesy, but superior to modern apps for that little simple piece of my production chain. One came out under Win 3.1, and 2 are from Win 95 days. They both run better than ever on Win 10. Also, I can run a DAW from 10 years ago, that barely ran when it came out, cough, like EVERY DAW that comes out, and get speed and rock solid performance on newer equipment. I just wanted to clear up those Windows myths, because they persist in academia, much longer. (for some reason). I’m also really liking some of the new directions Apple is taking, and thanks CK, for this great and informative article on the new Apple lineup. No matter the platform, creating digital music is a very worthwhile human endeavor. thx for all you do!!!

  • Mark McKee

    I go quite a ways back with both Apple & MS. I had access to the first Mac delivered to ABQ, as well as the first PC clones from Compaq, and I worked closely with Xerox software that ran off the legendary GUI that Xerox gave to Apple…and MS. Having been there, I’m familiar with the street myths from all the platforms, over the years, and so I thought it might be helpful for you to hear some truths right now. You can simply choose to laugh, I’m quite prepared for that eventuality, as George Harrison would say, but I’ve come to believe the tech press has replaced rock journalism in our society.(see Zappa quote on r.j.) In the days of the mainframes, there were the “high priests”, who became “DOS experts” in the 90s and have today become “Linux fanbois”. It’s all the same guys, regurgitating myths, with impressive sounding authority, but I would like to dispel a few right here. First off, Windows 10 is WAY more stable that Win 7, even in it’s first iteration. The “experts” don’t really know technically how windows works, not because its a big secret, but because it is work to read the MSs voluminous documentation. These same guys kept up the myth that games ran better on DOS than windows for almost a decade. It was never true. Sure, Windows 10 is spying on you, just as NASA is spying on the mars rovers. It’s called telemetry. The experts don’t understand the background processes so they cry spying, and would like to keep us on Win 7 until 2020, which is sad because Active Directory is much easier to connect and maintain on a modern OS. Also, a fully loaded surface pro 3, with all the extras, including a 6TB external, docking station, keyboard cover, etc. comes to around $2500. It is more powerful than the average desktop, and runs Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium. This means that it not only can replace a laptop and table, but also the desktop as well. One final note on Windows that NEVER gets mentioned. Windows is the undisputed King of legacy apps, and Win 10 made it even easier. I have favorite little music apps, really cheesy, but superior to modern apps for that little simple piece of my production chain. One came out under Win 3.1, and 2 are from Win 95 days. They both run better than ever on Win 10. Also, I can run a DAW from 10 years ago, that barely ran when it came out, cough, like EVERY DAW that comes out, and get speed and rock solid performance on newer equipment. I just wanted to clear up those Windows myths, because they persist in academia, much longer. (for some reason). I’m also really liking some of the new directions Apple is taking, and thanks CK, for this great and informative article on the new Apple lineup. No matter the platform, creating digital music is a very worthwhile human endeavor. thx for all you do!!!