::vtol:: silk from ::vtol:: on Vimeo.

Welcome to the Internet of Sounds.

The latest from our friend vtol, aka prolific Moscow-based sound artist Dmitry Morozov, is an installation of tall, spindly metal towers strung with wire. Standing at two meters, motorized fingers pull on diagonal strings – five of them, for the dollar, Yuan, Euro, Canadian dollar, and Ruble.

The tune, though, is all about data. As Bitcoin and Litecoin cryptocurrencies fluctuate in value against the more traditional currencies, the imagined monetary values generate new melodies and rhythms. Recalling both the controversial recent silk road and its historical analog, these silk strings form a mythological musical song.

vtol_silk0

The whole thing operates robotically in real-time, adding complexity, and high-precision motors create fine-tuned sonic details even if the data changes are minute.

Behind the scenes:

– tuning mechanism with 10 stepper motors
– 10 servo motors
– dimarzio guitar rail pickups
– 2 channel sound system
– arduino

software:

– max/msp
– pure data

vtol_silk2

vtol_silk

More: http://vtol.cc/filter/works/silk
Via Matrixsynth

  • Loowfizzz

    COOL!

  • Loowfizzz

    COOL!

  • Somedude

    I think i’d rather have an instrument that creates bitcoins out of music ( mine preferably)

  • Somedude

    I think i’d rather have an instrument that creates bitcoins out of music ( mine preferably)

  • MicHaeL

    Sounds like the dark side of money. Each vibration is another soul dying. 😉

  • MicHaeL

    Sounds like the dark side of money. Each vibration is another soul dying. 😉

  • Charles

    I was hoping it would make bitcoins go away and replace them with something actually useful.

    • Null

      Bitcoin is the first immutable universal public ledger to ever exist. You clearly have no idea about the technology behind Bitcoin if you think its useless.

      • Charles

        You’re right, it is useful for blackmail and for making libertarians even more tiresome.

        • Thomas Haferlach

          here is an informative video that could help get rid of some of those steterotypes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2CsJ2HMA2I

          • Charles

            Bitcoin is not a currency – it is backed by no commodity, it represents no real work done, and it is guaranteed by no authority or organization. It’s a Ponzi scam dressed up in a lot of pretentious claptrap useful for little more than untrackable extortion and separating libertarians and other fools from their gold hoards.

            Here’s an explanation from a source that is *not* trying to scam you: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonkblog/wp/2015/06/08/bitcoin-isnt-the-future-of-money-its-either-a-ponzi-scheme-or-a-pyramid-scheme/

          • Leo Treasure

            Bitcoin doesn’t need backing just like dollars aren’t backed by anything. There’s only one thing dollars guarantee you and that’s losing value, slowly but surely.

            That you think it’s a Ponzi scam shows how little you understand about it. The same argument could be made about any currency.

          • Charles

            Dollars are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Federal Reserve Bank, which you would know if you understood anything about currency. Did you read the article I posted? The only people who don’t think bitcoin is a scam are suckers and people hoping to make money off of suckers. Which are you?

          • Leo Treasure

            So what exactly do you get with the full faith and credit? Zilch. I skimmed the article you posted, it has a lot of circular reasoning and narrow-mindedness.

            I’m not hoping to make money off of suckers, I already made money buying in a few years ago. The biggest sucker in this world is the established financial system which, to quote from your article:

            “the average transfer fee, according to the World Bank, is 7.5 percent.”

  • Charles

    I was hoping it would make bitcoins go away and replace them with something actually useful.

    • Null

      Bitcoin is the first immutable universal public ledger to ever exist. You clearly have no idea about the technology behind Bitcoin if you think its useless.

      • Charles

        You’re right, it is useful for blackmail and for making libertarians even more tiresome.

        • Thomas Haferlach

          here is an informative video that could help get rid of some of those steterotypes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2CsJ2HMA2I

          • Charles

            Bitcoin is not a currency – it is backed by no commodity, it represents no real work done, and it is guaranteed by no authority or organization. It’s a Ponzi scam dressed up in a lot of pretentious claptrap useful for little more than untrackable extortion and separating libertarians and other fools from their gold hoards.

            Here’s an explanation from a source that is *not* trying to scam you: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonkblog/wp/2015/06/08/bitcoin-isnt-the-future-of-money-its-either-a-ponzi-scheme-or-a-pyramid-scheme/

          • Leo Treasure

            Bitcoin doesn’t need backing just like dollars aren’t backed by anything. There’s only one thing dollars guarantee you and that’s losing value, slowly but surely.

            That you think it’s a Ponzi scam shows how little you understand about it. The same argument could be made about any currency.

          • Charles

            Dollars are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Federal Reserve Bank, which you would know if you understood anything about currency. Did you read the article I posted? The only people who don’t think bitcoin is a scam are suckers and people hoping to make money off of suckers. Which are you?

          • Leo Treasure

            So what exactly do you get with the full faith and credit? Zilch. I skimmed the article you posted, it has a lot of circular reasoning and narrow-mindedness.

            I’m not hoping to make money off of suckers, I already made money buying in a few years ago. The biggest sucker in this world is the established financial system which, to quote from your article:

            “the average transfer fee, according to the World Bank, is 7.5 percent.”