Novation are promising something new on the 1st of October. Let’s just say whatever [redacted] may be, we’ll cover [redacted] when the time is right. But what I find interesting is the way they’re introducing the message. Just as Ableton did with Push, the message is about “starting something” – about getting past that initial creative impulse.

I think we’re seeing a shift in the way we talk about music technology in general. The old way of selling was to make the process as mysterious as possible. Serious professionals would tell you how they had the killer tool that you didn’t – the thing you’d want.

Now, we’re saying the opposite. After years of those experts resisting the democratization of music, the people making the tools are talking openly about demystifying music making.

On one level, it’s risky. After all, if you demystify music making, who’s to say that any music tool is really so important, anyway?

On another, what are we doing if not making tools for people who love music for people who will love them? And then it’s up to us writing about these tools, and eventually you using them, to see if they’re something you care about.

There are a number of videos, but my favorite comes from FOXTROTT, aka singer-producer Marie-Helene L. Delorme of Montreal. It’s hard to even describe her genre, in the right way, but it’s hip-hop-influenced, internationally-flavored and modern Québécois pop. She’s an independent, unsigned, unlabeled artist.

And I totally agree with the cooking metaphor. Producers can easily get stuck in endless in-the-box tweaking; the key to starting off on the right foot is getting those initial ingredients. Oddly, this makes me flash back to a similar speech about ingredients and making a stew by George Tsontakis, a new music composer who’s about as far as you can get from FOXTROTT as you might imagine. But the metaphor is universal.

You can hear more here:

And then next month we’ll talk about what Novation are doing, and then we’ll talk about what music you make with what you’re using, and that’s how this is all meant to work.

  • Jaybeeg

    The marketing teams at Novation, Yamaha, Roland and Korg should be required to watch each other’s content-free teasers in an endless loop for about 48 hours. They’re wasting our time. All I got out of this particular video was that you can buy sausage at a market in Montreal. Oh, and that vintage Ampex tape reels look great.

    • I’m right with you there :p Was expecting some obscure angle of a new product to show up at the last second to leave us guessing but nothing :p Waste of time >_<

    • At the risk of adding an overly negative comment, I have to agree with you. These teasers are getting too numerous to add anticipation, only frustration at the lack of something definitive to present.

      • I’m not a huge fan of teasers, no. I am a fan of the shift in tone, as I said, but…

        I guess the problem is this — the only people likely to care enough to watch a teaser are the people who just want the actual information already. Now, I don’t see this as content-free — this content *could* be pretty meaningful if the order were reversed, if you talked to the artist but already knew what the [xxxx] was.

        Actually, maybe these companies do it for the same reason I did here. *I’m* keen to tell you what they’re talking about in this video. They of course are; they’ve spent some inordinate amount of time working on [xxx].

        But … imagining a surprise party. The people giving the surprise party are excited before the guest is. But… you don’t start trying to “tease” the guesses. You just have to do the reveal. And then after that, you should throw a really good party and maintain the enthusiasm that way. 😉

        If someone wants to defend teasers, meanwhile, be my guest… 😀

        • freeks

          Apple has best teasers. They just design one flyer for their live event.

          Big up for NI for NOT creating teaser for Reaktor 6. They could have as blocks sound and look good.

        • Roikat

          The purpose of teasers is for folks like Peter to blog about them. Then, we ignore the teaser, but are aware of [redacted] in the pipeline, so we may pay more attention to the actual release. At least that’s what the marketers hope. It’s annoying, but it probably works, hence all the teasers.

  • Jaybeeg

    The marketing teams at Novation, Yamaha, Roland and Korg should be required to watch each other’s content-free teasers in an endless loop for about 48 hours. They’re wasting our time.

    All I got out of this particular video was that you can buy sausage at a market in Montreal. Oh, and that vintage Ampex tape reels look great.

    • I’m right with you there :p Was expecting some obscure angle of a new product to show up at the last second to leave us guessing but nothing :p Waste of time >_<

    • At the risk of adding an overly negative comment, I have to agree with you. These teasers are getting too numerous to add anticipation, only frustration at the lack of something definitive to present.

      • I’m not a huge fan of teasers, no. I am a fan of the shift in tone, as I said, but…

        I guess the problem is this — the only people likely to care enough to watch a teaser are the people who just want the actual information already. Now, I don’t see this as content-free — this content *could* be pretty meaningful if the order were reversed, if you talked to the artist but already knew what the [xxxx] was.

        Actually, maybe these companies do it for the same reason I did here. *I’m* keen to tell you what they’re talking about in this video. They of course are; they’ve spent some inordinate amount of time working on [xxx].

        But … imagining a surprise party. The people giving the surprise party are excited before the guest is. But… you don’t start trying to “tease” the guesses. You just have to do the reveal. And then after that, you should throw a really good party and maintain the enthusiasm that way. 😉

        If someone wants to defend teasers, meanwhile, be my guest… 😀

        • freeks

          Apple has best teasers. They just design one flyer for their live event.

          Big up for NI for NOT creating teaser for Reaktor 6. They could have as blocks sound and look good.

        • Roikat

          The purpose of teasers is for folks like Peter to blog about them. Then, we ignore the teaser, but are aware of [redacted] in the pipeline, so we may pay more attention to the actual release. At least that’s what the marketers hope. It’s annoying, but it probably works, hence all the teasers.

  • Jaybeeg

    The marketing teams at Novation, Yamaha, Roland and Korg should be required to watch each other’s content-free teasers in an endless loop for about 48 hours. They’re wasting our time.

    All I got out of this particular video was that you can buy sausage at a market in Montreal. Oh, and that vintage Ampex tape reels look great.

    • I’m right with you there :p Was expecting some obscure angle of a new product to show up at the last second to leave us guessing but nothing :p Waste of time >_<

    • At the risk of adding an overly negative comment, I have to agree with you. These teasers are getting too numerous to add anticipation, only frustration at the lack of something definitive to present.

      • I’m not a huge fan of teasers, no. I am a fan of the shift in tone, as I said, but…

        I guess the problem is this — the only people likely to care enough to watch a teaser are the people who just want the actual information already. Now, I don’t see this as content-free — this content *could* be pretty meaningful if the order were reversed, if you talked to the artist but already knew what the [xxxx] was.

        Actually, maybe these companies do it for the same reason I did here. *I’m* keen to tell you what they’re talking about in this video. They of course are; they’ve spent some inordinate amount of time working on [xxx].

        But … imagining a surprise party. The people giving the surprise party are excited before the guest is. But… you don’t start trying to “tease” the guesses. You just have to do the reveal. And then after that, you should throw a really good party and maintain the enthusiasm that way. 😉

        If someone wants to defend teasers, meanwhile, be my guest… 😀

        • freeks

          Apple has best teasers. They just design one flyer for their live event.

          Big up for NI for NOT creating teaser for Reaktor 6. They could have as blocks sound and look good.

        • Roikat

          The purpose of teasers is for folks like Peter to blog about them. Then, we ignore the teaser, but are aware of [redacted] in the pipeline, so we may pay more attention to the actual release. At least that’s what the marketers hope. It’s annoying, but it probably works, hence all the teasers.

  • Polite Society

    I do love the cooking metaphor.

    My problem has never been starting things, my problem is I’m always starting things and never finishing them.

    • I’m also a huge fan of the cooking metaphor – I love to use it to break down sound design with my students and to say why presets are bad! :p

      “Designing sound is like cooking – you’ve got to combine the right ingredients. Sure ice cream and steak might taste great by themselves but an ice cream steak is gonna suck! :p So using presets is like taking 2 foods that might be great by themselves but probably won’t gel well together.”

      • Polite Society

        I’d say using presets is like the equivalent of frozen lasagna (or any pre-made meal). Sure, it tastes okay, and it’ll be ready without much effort, but how much better is it when you make it yourself?

        • At the same time, how far do you want to take that analogy though? Grow all your own vegetables? Travel the world looking for all the spices you need first?

          • Sounds like a metaphor for DIY synth making and scouring eBay for rare components!

          • This thread is classic! 😀 This analogy works beautifully! 🙂

          • Polite Society

            You could take it pretty far, though the same thing could be said for music production.

            Do you build your own patches/sounds rather than using presets/packs? If you do, did you build your own synth/write your own software? If you built your synth, is it your own design, or just a kit? etc etc. it’s a dangerous rabbit hole to explore.

        • As a fan of synth noodling and home made lasagna I can only agree with your sentiment

          • Polite Society

            I also like synth noodles.

          • Will

            I see what you did there.

        • Will

          How would you extend the frozen lasagna analogy to include things with “preset” sounds like guitars, drums, xylophones, trumpets, pianos…?

          I think fundamentally we’re coming from the same place—I much prefer to make my own sounds. Hell, I started playing synthesizers 180 years ago precisely because they afforded me an opportunity to make and musically use sounds unlike sounds I’d heard before. But if someone uses presets to make music and they’re musically happy about it I don’t see that as any sort of shortcut or cheapening of the music. I certainly wouldn’t say that Keith Jarrett is cooking with frozen lasagna!

          • Polite Society

            Hey, I don’t have anything against frozen lasagne. I still eat it from time to time, enjoy it even.

            In regards to sampled sounds in keyboatds, How much better does it sound if they switch out the rompler sounds and use a real instrument? Of course some people can apply virtuosity to playing of such things, and they transcend their baseness. You might use frozen lasagne, but add your own twist to things that make it uniquely your own creation.

            Sometimes the baseness of the sound is the point. I’ve heard casiotone and old general midi sounds used to great effect. Maybe that plays in to a nostalgia aspect. I think I want some frozen lasagne for dinner tonight, now. :/

        • Frank

          I too say that consuming recorded music is like eating food from cans. In our age,the mass production of food,stored in cans is like metaphor for the commercial music (pop/dance..)
          On the other side, there is quite a lot new electronic artists,trying to cook from fresh ingredients,right at the front of the audience, but the meals are really non edible…yet
          I think,combination of the pre cooked recordings (from late night jams…) with live improvisation is the future for clubs

        • foljs

          “””but how much better is it when you make it yourself?”””

          Depends. Compared to a good chef (sound designer)? Not much, and can even be worse. The busy-work of “cooking” your own sound of course will make you feel like you accomplished something, but the track in fact might suffer for it.

          Use what’s best. If you can built something better than a preset sound, do it. Don’t just build some ho-hum custom square wavy things to say “It’s my own” though.

          The way I think about it, if the preset sound of a piano was good enough for Bach, then lots of those 1.000.000.000 available synth/rompler presets nowadays are good enough for me.

      • Freeks

        I prefer to spend my “music time” on writing new tracks and actually finish some music than design new sounds. I have never been in to sound design and that’s not something i want to spend too much time on. I do sound design sometimes when too lazy to do music.

        I love synths like new Alchemy and Serum, but i have no intention of learning to design sounds on those. They come with GREAT sounds designed by professionals. To me editing preset is enough.

        Analogy of “pre made food” is quite bad on sound design. Many of the sounds are designed by the best sound designers in the world. I doubt that anyone writing here is better than those guys.

        If i could get fresh meal cooked by Jamie Oliver everyday, i doubt i would cook anymore 😉 And yes, presets are fresh 1:1 copy as the designer had intended. It’s about us how to use them.

        • Polite Society

          🙂

    • That’s an interesting question… and actually, I had the same concern about Push. Great, starting tracks, but…

      Anyway, I’m not sure this even is the right story to tell about this [xxxx] … well, I’ll have my own take on it, anyway. 😉

      • Lee Chaos

        A the amount of money that can be made from ‘finished’ recorded music continues to diminish, and live music continues to grow (if not the revenues generated from it for smaller artists…) then I start to question whether ‘finishing’ tracks is worth bothering with.
        My preferred way of working now has been to take a construction kit to a show and build it in front of, or with input from, an audience so each show is different. If there was never a ‘finished’ version, then the expectations of the audience change; they were never given a definitive version so they can only really judge each performance on its own merit.

        • Polite Society

          I’m trying to work towards this as well. Though I would like to have examples of that work in order to attract shows, show people, and for my own vanity.

          Do you have any recorded sets? My problem with the improv route thus far is that it tends to take quite a while for anything to happen. I guess I’m also pretty bad at transitioning.

          See below for an example from a set a few months ago.
          https://theartifactory.bandcamp.com/track/polite-society

    • Roikat

      I once made my living as a chocolatier, so for me the metaphor is making chocolate/ making music. Works for me because a chocolate factory is more techno than the average kitchen. But yeah, I do have many unfinished batches in the in-process storage tanks.

  • Polite Society

    I do love the cooking metaphor.

    My problem has never been starting things, my problem is I’m always starting things and never finishing them.

    • I’m also a huge fan of the cooking metaphor – I love to use it to break down sound design with my students and to say why presets are bad! :p

      “Designing sound is like cooking – you’ve got to combine the right ingredients. Sure ice cream and steak might taste great by themselves but an ice cream steak is gonna suck! :p So using presets is like taking 2 foods that might be great by themselves but probably won’t gel well together.”

      • Polite Society

        I’d say using presets is like the equivalent of frozen lasagna (or any pre-made meal). Sure, it tastes okay, and it’ll be ready without much effort, but how much better is it when you make it yourself?

        • At the same time, how far do you want to take that analogy though? Grow all your own vegetables? Travel the world looking for all the spices you need first?

          • Sounds like a metaphor for DIY synth making and scouring eBay for rare components!

          • This thread is classic! 😀 This analogy works beautifully! 🙂

          • Polite Society

            You could take it pretty far, though the same thing could be said for music production.

            Do you build your own patches/sounds rather than using presets/packs? If you do, did you build your own synth/write your own software? If you built your synth, is it your own design, or just a kit? etc etc. it’s a dangerous rabbit hole to explore.

        • As a fan of synth noodling and home made lasagna I can only agree with your sentiment

          • Polite Society

            I also like synth noodles.

          • Will

            I see what you did there.

        • Will

          How would you extend the frozen lasagna analogy to include things with “preset” sounds like guitars, drums, xylophones, trumpets, pianos…?

          I think fundamentally we’re coming from the same place—I much prefer to make my own sounds. Hell, I started playing synthesizers 180 years ago precisely because they afforded me an opportunity to make and musically use sounds unlike sounds I’d heard before. But if someone uses presets to make music and they’re musically happy about it I don’t see that as any sort of shortcut or cheapening of the music. I certainly wouldn’t say that Keith Jarrett is cooking with frozen lasagna!

          • Polite Society

            Hey, I don’t have anything against frozen lasagne. I still eat it from time to time, enjoy it even.

            In regards to sampled sounds in keyboatds, How much better does it sound if they switch out the rompler sounds and use a real instrument? Of course some people can apply virtuosity to playing of such things, and they transcend their baseness. You might use frozen lasagne, but add your own twist to things that make it uniquely your own creation.

            Sometimes the baseness of the sound is the point. I’ve heard casiotone and old general midi sounds used to great effect. Maybe that plays in to a nostalgia aspect. I think I want some frozen lasagne for dinner tonight, now. :/

        • Frank

          I too say that consuming recorded music is like eating food from cans. In our age,the mass production of food,stored in cans is like metaphor for the commercial music (pop/dance..)
          On the other side, there is quite a lot new electronic artists,trying to cook from fresh ingredients,right at the front of the audience, but the meals are really non edible…yet
          I think,combination of the pre cooked recordings (from late night jams…) with live improvisation is the future for clubs

        • foljs

          “””but how much better is it when you make it yourself?”””

          Depends. Compared to a good chef (sound designer)? Not much, and can even be worse. The busy-work of “cooking” your own sound of course will make you feel like you accomplished something, but the track in fact might suffer for it.

          Use what’s best. If you can built something better than a preset sound, do it. Don’t just build some ho-hum custom square wavy things to say “It’s my own” though.

          The way I think about it, if the preset sound of a piano was good enough for Bach, then lots of those 1.000.000.000 available synth/rompler presets nowadays are good enough for me.

      • Freeks

        I prefer to spend my “music time” on writing new tracks and actually finish some music than design new sounds. I have never been in to sound design and that’s not something i want to spend too much time on. I do sound design sometimes when too lazy to do music.

        I love synths like new Alchemy and Serum, but i have no intention of learning to design sounds on those. They come with GREAT sounds designed by professionals. To me editing preset is enough.

        Analogy of “pre made food” is quite bad on sound design. Many of the sounds are designed by the best sound designers in the world. I doubt that anyone writing here is better than those guys.

        If i could get fresh meal cooked by Jamie Oliver everyday, i doubt i would cook anymore 😉 And yes, presets are fresh 1:1 copy as the designer had intended. It’s about us how to use them.

        • Polite Society

          🙂

    • That’s an interesting question… and actually, I had the same concern about Push. Great, starting tracks, but…

      Anyway, I’m not sure this even is the right story to tell about this [xxxx] … well, I’ll have my own take on it, anyway. 😉

      • Lee Chaos

        A the amount of money that can be made from ‘finished’ recorded music continues to diminish, and live music continues to grow (if not the revenues generated from it for smaller artists…) then I start to question whether ‘finishing’ tracks is worth bothering with.
        My preferred way of working now has been to take a construction kit to a show and build it in front of, or with input from, an audience so each show is different. If there was never a ‘finished’ version, then the expectations of the audience change; they were never given a definitive version so they can only really judge each performance on its own merit.

        • Polite Society

          I’m trying to work towards this as well. Though I would like to have examples of that work in order to attract shows, show people, and for my own vanity.

          Do you have any recorded sets? My problem with the improv route thus far is that it tends to take quite a while for anything to happen. I guess I’m also pretty bad at transitioning.

          See below for an example from a set a few months ago.
          https://theartifactory.bandcamp.com/track/polite-society

    • Roikat

      I once made my living as a chocolatier, so for me the metaphor is making chocolate/ making music. Works for me because a chocolate factory is more techno than the average kitchen. But yeah, I do have many unfinished batches in the in-process storage tanks.

  • Polite Society

    I do love the cooking metaphor.

    My problem has never been starting things, my problem is I’m always starting things and never finishing them.

    • I’m also a huge fan of the cooking metaphor – I love to use it to break down sound design with my students and to say why presets are bad! :p

      “Designing sound is like cooking – you’ve got to combine the right ingredients. Sure ice cream and steak might taste great by themselves but an ice cream steak is gonna suck! :p So using presets is like taking 2 foods that might be great by themselves but probably won’t gel well together.”

      • Polite Society

        I’d say using presets is like the equivalent of frozen lasagna (or any pre-made meal). Sure, it tastes okay, and it’ll be ready without much effort, but how much better is it when you make it yourself?

        • At the same time, how far do you want to take that analogy though? Grow all your own vegetables? Travel the world looking for all the spices you need first?

          • Sounds like a metaphor for DIY synth making and scouring eBay for rare components!

          • This thread is classic! 😀 This analogy works beautifully! 🙂

          • Polite Society

            You could take it pretty far, though the same thing could be said for music production.

            Do you build your own patches/sounds rather than using presets/packs? If you do, did you build your own synth/write your own software? If you built your synth, is it your own design, or just a kit? etc etc. it’s a dangerous rabbit hole to explore.

        • As a fan of synth noodling and home made lasagna I can only agree with your sentiment

          • Polite Society

            I also like synth noodles.

          • Will

            I see what you did there.

        • Will

          How would you extend the frozen lasagna analogy to include things with “preset” sounds like guitars, drums, xylophones, trumpets, pianos…?

          I think fundamentally we’re coming from the same place—I much prefer to make my own sounds. Hell, I started playing synthesizers 180 years ago precisely because they afforded me an opportunity to make and musically use sounds unlike sounds I’d heard before. But if someone uses presets to make music and they’re musically happy about it I don’t see that as any sort of shortcut or cheapening of the music. I certainly wouldn’t say that Keith Jarrett is cooking with frozen lasagna!

          • Polite Society

            Hey, I don’t have anything against frozen lasagne. I still eat it from time to time, enjoy it even.

            In regards to sampled sounds in keyboatds, How much better does it sound if they switch out the rompler sounds and use a real instrument? Of course some people can apply virtuosity to playing of such things, and they transcend their baseness. You might use frozen lasagne, but add your own twist to things that make it uniquely your own creation.

            Sometimes the baseness of the sound is the point. I’ve heard casiotone and old general midi sounds used to great effect. Maybe that plays in to a nostalgia aspect. I think I want some frozen lasagne for dinner tonight, now. :/

        • Frank

          I too say that consuming recorded music is like eating food from cans. In our age,the mass production of food,stored in cans is like metaphor for the commercial music (pop/dance..)
          On the other side, there is quite a lot new electronic artists,trying to cook from fresh ingredients,right at the front of the audience, but the meals are really non edible…yet
          I think,combination of the pre cooked recordings (from late night jams…) with live improvisation is the future for clubs

        • foljs

          “””but how much better is it when you make it yourself?”””

          Depends. Compared to a good chef (sound designer)? Not much, and can even be worse. The busy-work of “cooking” your own sound of course will make you feel like you accomplished something, but the track in fact might suffer for it.

          Use what’s best. If you can built something better than a preset sound, do it. Don’t just build some ho-hum custom square wavy things to say “It’s my own” though.

          The way I think about it, if the preset sound of a piano was good enough for Bach, then lots of those 1.000.000.000 available synth/rompler presets nowadays are good enough for me.

      • Freeks

        I prefer to spend my “music time” on writing new tracks and actually finish some music than design new sounds. I have never been in to sound design and that’s not something i want to spend too much time on. I do sound design sometimes when too lazy to do music.

        I love synths like new Alchemy and Serum, but i have no intention of learning to design sounds on those. They come with GREAT sounds designed by professionals. To me editing preset is enough.

        Analogy of “pre made food” is quite bad on sound design. Many of the sounds are designed by the best sound designers in the world. I doubt that anyone writing here is better than those guys.

        If i could get fresh meal cooked by Jamie Oliver everyday, i doubt i would cook anymore 😉 And yes, presets are fresh 1:1 copy as the designer had intended. It’s about us how to use them.

        • Polite Society

          🙂

    • That’s an interesting question… and actually, I had the same concern about Push. Great, starting tracks, but…

      Anyway, I’m not sure this even is the right story to tell about this [xxxx] … well, I’ll have my own take on it, anyway. 😉

      • Lee Chaos

        A the amount of money that can be made from ‘finished’ recorded music continues to diminish, and live music continues to grow (if not the revenues generated from it for smaller artists…) then I start to question whether ‘finishing’ tracks is worth bothering with.
        My preferred way of working now has been to take a construction kit to a show and build it in front of, or with input from, an audience so each show is different. If there was never a ‘finished’ version, then the expectations of the audience change; they were never given a definitive version so they can only really judge each performance on its own merit.

        • Polite Society

          I’m trying to work towards this as well. Though I would like to have examples of that work in order to attract shows, show people, and for my own vanity.

          Do you have any recorded sets? My problem with the improv route thus far is that it tends to take quite a while for anything to happen. I guess I’m also pretty bad at transitioning.

          See below for an example from a set a few months ago.
          https://theartifactory.bandcamp.com/track/polite-society

    • Roikat

      I once made my living as a chocolatier, so for me the metaphor is making chocolate/ making music. Works for me because a chocolate factory is more techno than the average kitchen. But yeah, I do have many unfinished batches in the in-process storage tanks.

  • Love your blasé tone :p I think its getting a bit ridiculous in the music tech sphere at the moment – seems to be copying the smartphone angle where the tech you bought 2 weeks ago is made obsolete by a new product. Feels almost like we’re in a bit of a ‘Music Tech Bubble’ tbh.

    • Polite Society

      I think it’s a music tech renaissance. We are getting almost every conceivable variation of both hardware and software, and it keeps getting cheaper and more available. The only problem with all these things, there is so much noise and gear lust that it can blind us from the very thing that these devices and software set out to do in the first place, which is make music.

      15 years ago, I never would have been able to go to my music store and buy myself an analog synth, let alone modular. You’d never have been able to do such good productions in such little time, especially not while on the bus, or on software that costs in the range of money that most apps do.

      • You know, i still fall back on Synth1 for most duties just because it is faster and more convenient than hooking up my hardware when I want to build the bones of a track quickly. Then I get so used to the synth1 sounds that I never bother to change them.

    • You know, I am continually surprised by some of the capabilities of older technology. I have just got my dad’s old Roland CM64 working for example, which despite sounding cheesy as anything can do lots of different sounds and effects, is multitimbral and fits in a small footprint on my desk. It is not so much that newer gear can offer something better, just something different and perhaps at a cheaper price than ever before (as has already been mentioned)

      • That is absolutely true. Was it Keyboard or EM (or both?) regularly doing a feature on vintage gear … sort of reviewing it from the modern perspective.

        An eBay review series sounds like a lot of fun.

        Frankly, it should put a little extra pressure on manufacturers to consider whether there stuff is better. And I think being better – not just cheaper and different, but better – is a worthy goal. 🙂

        “Different” certainly is there. You learn something from what went before.

        • I’d like to say “inspiring” instead of “better”. Of course, for today’s electronic instruments it is also important to have all sorts of connectivity included (both hard- and software, CV/Gate, DAW integration, USB, you name it). But ultimately, an instrument is only worth keeping, when it inspires you to turn it on, play it and write new music with it.

          And that can certainly be done equally well with an 808, a TR-8, some samples in your DAW or with a self-soldered, home made device that knobody knows, because you just built it for yourself.

          That’s why, for me, teasers are somewhat fun to watch, tutorials and demos are important to get an idea about whether or not to purchase something, but in the end, I praise music stores for their return policies. Because playing an instrument in your own, already established environment is where you find out whether or not tha new device is for you.

          • Two things to note, speaking as a manufacturer:

            Online return policies are also a thing. (In fact, they’re required by law in the EU.)

            This is also why manufacturers build large margins into products. They have to, in order to deal with things like returns. Calling them “profit” margins is actually not even accurate – it’s not profit; it usually covers other expenses that aren’t directly represented in the material value of the product.

          • Well, if that is what is required to have an infrastructure in place that allows me to order e.g. a synth, get it delivered to my home studio, try it out and then decide if I want to keep it or not – I am happy to support that.

            In fact, I would of course prefer not to have to do that, but when those synths are not available in your town (or even country – try to find any non-mainstream synth stores even in the main capital Copenhagen!), that’s the only way to do it. I can’t afford flying to Berlin every time when I want to check out any new synth in Schneiders Laden, just because nobody in Denmark has it in store….

          • Polite Society

            I wish I could fly to Berlin just to try out new synths 🙂

          • viess

            Do you know any synth store in Berlin except JustMusic?

          • Schneidersladen.de for example.

          • viess

            Thanks, that seems quite boutique analog-modular oriented. I’m travailing to Berlin next week and would like to check Roli and Elektron in particular and maybe new Casio workstation/synths otherwise unavailable in my location

  • Love your blasé tone :p I think its getting a bit ridiculous in the music tech sphere at the moment – seems to be copying the smartphone angle where the tech you bought 2 weeks ago is made obsolete by a new product. Feels almost like we’re in a bit of a ‘Music Tech Bubble’ tbh.

    • Polite Society

      I think it’s a music tech renaissance. We are getting almost every conceivable variation of both hardware and software, and it keeps getting cheaper and more available. The only problem with all these things, there is so much noise and gear lust that it can blind us from the very thing that these devices and software set out to do in the first place, which is make music.

      15 years ago, I never would have been able to go to my music store and buy myself an analog synth, let alone modular. You’d never have been able to do such good productions in such little time, especially not while on the bus, or on software that costs in the range of money that most apps do.

      • You know, i still fall back on Synth1 for most duties just because it is faster and more convenient than hooking up my hardware when I want to build the bones of a track quickly. Then I get so used to the synth1 sounds that I never bother to change them.

    • You know, I am continually surprised by some of the capabilities of older technology. I have just got my dad’s old Roland CM64 working for example, which despite sounding cheesy as anything can do lots of different sounds and effects, is multitimbral and fits in a small footprint on my desk. It is not so much that newer gear can offer something better, just something different and perhaps at a cheaper price than ever before (as has already been mentioned)

      • That is absolutely true. Was it Keyboard or EM (or both?) regularly doing a feature on vintage gear … sort of reviewing it from the modern perspective.

        An eBay review series sounds like a lot of fun.

        Frankly, it should put a little extra pressure on manufacturers to consider whether there stuff is better. And I think being better – not just cheaper and different, but better – is a worthy goal. 🙂

        “Different” certainly is there. You learn something from what went before.

        • I’d like to say “inspiring” instead of “better”. Of course, for today’s electronic instruments it is also important to have all sorts of connectivity included (both hard- and software, CV/Gate, DAW integration, USB, you name it). But ultimately, an instrument is only worth keeping, when it inspires you to turn it on, play it and write new music with it.

          And that can certainly be done equally well with an 808, a TR-8, some samples in your DAW or with a self-soldered, home made device that knobody knows, because you just built it for yourself.

          That’s why, for me, teasers are somewhat fun to watch, tutorials and demos are important to get an idea about whether or not to purchase something, but in the end, I praise music stores for their return policies. Because playing an instrument in your own, already established environment is where you find out whether or not tha new device is for you.

          • Two things to note, speaking as a manufacturer:

            Online return policies are also a thing. (In fact, they’re required by law in the EU.)

            This is also why manufacturers build large margins into products. They have to, in order to deal with things like returns. Calling them “profit” margins is actually not even accurate – it’s not profit; it usually covers other expenses that aren’t directly represented in the material value of the product.

          • Well, if that is what is required to have an infrastructure in place that allows me to order e.g. a synth, get it delivered to my home studio, try it out and then decide if I want to keep it or not – I am happy to support that.

            In fact, I would of course prefer not to have to do that, but when those synths are not available in your town (or even country – try to find any non-mainstream synth stores even in the main capital Copenhagen!), that’s the only way to do it. I can’t afford flying to Berlin every time when I want to check out any new synth in Schneiders Laden, just because nobody in Denmark has it in store….

          • Polite Society

            I wish I could fly to Berlin just to try out new synths 🙂

          • viess

            Do you know any synth store in Berlin except JustMusic?

          • Schneidersladen.de for example.

          • viess

            Thanks, that seems quite boutique analog-modular oriented. I’m travailing to Berlin next week and would like to check Roli and Elektron in particular and maybe new Casio workstation/synths otherwise unavailable in my location

  • Love your blasé tone :p I think its getting a bit ridiculous in the music tech sphere at the moment – seems to be copying the smartphone angle where the tech you bought 2 weeks ago is made obsolete by a new product. Feels almost like we’re in a bit of a ‘Music Tech Bubble’ tbh.

    • Polite Society

      I think it’s a music tech renaissance. We are getting almost every conceivable variation of both hardware and software, and it keeps getting cheaper and more available. The only problem with all these things, there is so much noise and gear lust that it can blind us from the very thing that these devices and software set out to do in the first place, which is make music.

      15 years ago, I never would have been able to go to my music store and buy myself an analog synth, let alone modular. You’d never have been able to do such good productions in such little time, especially not while on the bus, or on software that costs in the range of money that most apps do.

      • You know, i still fall back on Synth1 for most duties just because it is faster and more convenient than hooking up my hardware when I want to build the bones of a track quickly. Then I get so used to the synth1 sounds that I never bother to change them.

    • You know, I am continually surprised by some of the capabilities of older technology. I have just got my dad’s old Roland CM64 working for example, which despite sounding cheesy as anything can do lots of different sounds and effects, is multitimbral and fits in a small footprint on my desk. It is not so much that newer gear can offer something better, just something different and perhaps at a cheaper price than ever before (as has already been mentioned)

      • That is absolutely true. Was it Keyboard or EM (or both?) regularly doing a feature on vintage gear … sort of reviewing it from the modern perspective.

        An eBay review series sounds like a lot of fun.

        Frankly, it should put a little extra pressure on manufacturers to consider whether there stuff is better. And I think being better – not just cheaper and different, but better – is a worthy goal. 🙂

        “Different” certainly is there. You learn something from what went before.

        • I’d like to say “inspiring” instead of “better”. Of course, for today’s electronic instruments it is also important to have all sorts of connectivity included (both hard- and software, CV/Gate, DAW integration, USB, you name it). But ultimately, an instrument is only worth keeping, when it inspires you to turn it on, play it and write new music with it.

          And that can certainly be done equally well with an 808, a TR-8, some samples in your DAW or with a self-soldered, home made device that knobody knows, because you just built it for yourself.

          That’s why, for me, teasers are somewhat fun to watch, tutorials and demos are important to get an idea about whether or not to purchase something, but in the end, I praise music stores for their return policies. Because playing an instrument in your own, already established environment is where you find out whether or not tha new device is for you.

          • Two things to note, speaking as a manufacturer:

            Online return policies are also a thing. (In fact, they’re required by law in the EU.)

            This is also why manufacturers build large margins into products. They have to, in order to deal with things like returns. Calling them “profit” margins is actually not even accurate – it’s not profit; it usually covers other expenses that aren’t directly represented in the material value of the product.

          • Well, if that is what is required to have an infrastructure in place that allows me to order e.g. a synth, get it delivered to my home studio, try it out and then decide if I want to keep it or not – I am happy to support that.

            In fact, I would of course prefer not to have to do that, but when those synths are not available in your town (or even country – try to find any non-mainstream synth stores even in the main capital Copenhagen!), that’s the only way to do it. I can’t afford flying to Berlin every time when I want to check out any new synth in Schneiders Laden, just because nobody in Denmark has it in store….

          • Polite Society

            I wish I could fly to Berlin just to try out new synths 🙂

          • viess

            Do you know any synth store in Berlin except JustMusic?

          • Schneidersladen.de for example.

          • viess

            Thanks, that seems quite boutique analog-modular oriented. I’m travailing to Berlin next week and would like to check Roli and Elektron in particular and maybe new Casio workstation/synths otherwise unavailable in my location

  • Loowfizzz

    The killertool is a good idea!

  • Loowfizzz

    The killertool is a good idea!

  • Loowfizzz

    The killertool is a good idea!

  • iiiivvvv

    The music as food metaphor is really apt – not just as a metaphor for the creation of music, but also for the consumption of it.

    Nobody ever says “well I don’t know anything about food, but I LOVED that meal.” They just say, “I LOVED that meal.” Music can and should elicit that response, too, I think.

    It’s impossible to talk about personal taste in both music and food without acknowledging the huge role that memory plays. We love the foods we love because they remind us of home/loved ones/security — we love the food on which we’ve been raised. Similarly with music, everybody who hears a piece of music brings with them the memories of every song they’ve ever heard.

    I love the cooking as art metaphor because it reminds me that creation and consumption are linked. I’m always going to make some version of something I’ve consumed before. I find this cycle really soothing.

    uh oh, i’m hungry now.

  • iiiivvvv

    The music as food metaphor is really apt – not just as a metaphor for the creation of music, but also for the consumption of it.

    Nobody ever says “well I don’t know anything about food, but I LOVED that meal.” They just say, “I LOVED that meal.” Music can and should elicit that response, too, I think.

    It’s impossible to talk about personal taste in both music and food without acknowledging the huge role that memory plays. We love the foods we love because they remind us of home/loved ones/security — we love the food on which we’ve been raised. Similarly with music, everybody who hears a piece of music brings with them the memories of every song they’ve ever heard.

    I love the cooking as art metaphor because it reminds me that creation and consumption are linked. I’m always going to make some version of something I’ve consumed before. I find this cycle really soothing.

    uh oh, i’m hungry now.

  • iiiivvvv

    The music as food metaphor is really apt – not just as a metaphor for the creation of music, but also for the consumption of it.

    Nobody ever says “well I don’t know anything about food, but I LOVED that meal.” They just say, “I LOVED that meal.” Music can and should elicit that response, too, I think.

    It’s impossible to talk about personal taste in both music and food without acknowledging the huge role that memory plays. We love the foods we love because they remind us of home/loved ones/security — we love the food on which we’ve been raised. Similarly with music, everybody who hears a piece of music brings with them the memories of every song they’ve ever heard.

    I love the cooking as art metaphor because it reminds me that creation and consumption are linked. I’m always going to make some version of something I’ve consumed before. I find this cycle really soothing.

    uh oh, i’m hungry now.

  • jblk

    Was that Markthalle Neun she was at in the video?

  • jblk

    Was that Markthalle Neun she was at in the video?

  • jblk

    Was that Markthalle Neun she was at in the video?

  • Chris Stack

    “Cooking and making music is for me weirdly the same”… got my attention right away because it’s the same for me. The Korg MicroPreset also caught my attention. It was my first synth. Glad those hooks caught me because I’m really enjoying her music now.

  • Chris Stack

    “Cooking and making music is for me weirdly the same”… got my attention right away because it’s the same for me. The Korg MicroPreset also caught my attention. It was my first synth. Glad those hooks caught me because I’m really enjoying her music now.

  • Chris Stack

    “Cooking and making music is for me weirdly the same”… got my attention right away because it’s the same for me. The Korg MicroPreset also caught my attention. It was my first synth. Glad those hooks caught me because I’m really enjoying her music now.

  • Circuit Slave

    I love Novation’s products from owning the original launchpad and bassstation to owning the SL series and now LP Pro and BS2, but yeah, I’m sorry, these marketing campaigns are stupid– just release whatever it is already–let us be the judge! I guess at least there wasn’t a stupid Roland countdown clock. Also another thing– give us what we want! Listen to your consumers! Believe me, if you would FINALLY release a POLYSTATION or new DRUMSTATION with sequencer, you wouldn’t need these stupid cryptic Yamaha Reface video teasers.

  • Circuit Slave

    I love Novation’s products from owning the original launchpad and bassstation to owning the SL series and now LP Pro and BS2, but yeah, I’m sorry, these marketing campaigns are stupid– just release whatever it is already–let us be the judge! I guess at least there wasn’t a stupid Roland countdown clock. Also another thing– give us what we want! Listen to your consumers! Believe me, if you would FINALLY release a POLYSTATION or new DRUMSTATION with sequencer, you wouldn’t need these stupid cryptic Yamaha Reface video teasers.

  • Circuit Slave

    I love Novation’s products from owning the original launchpad and bassstation to owning the SL series and now LP Pro and BS2, but yeah, I’m sorry, these marketing campaigns are stupid– just release whatever it is already–let us be the judge! I guess at least there wasn’t a stupid Roland countdown clock. Also another thing– give us what we want! Listen to your consumers! Believe me, if you would FINALLY release a POLYSTATION or new DRUMSTATION with sequencer, you wouldn’t need these stupid cryptic Yamaha Reface video teasers.

  • Ashley Brown

    thank goodness its not an app. Roll on 4pm

  • Ashley Brown

    thank goodness its not an app. Roll on 4pm

  • thank goodness its not an app. Roll on 4pm