s88

Do you want to buy a keyboard with integrated control for your software? Sure! What if it only controls specific Native Instruments software via pre-defined mappings? Uh… hrm.

Now, that offering changes. Native Instruments’ KOMPLETE KONTROL S-series keyboards later this month get some updates that will be essential to improving the value equation – a piano-friendly keyboard, third-party plug-in support, and custom control mappings.

First, for pianists, there’s the inevitable 88-key hammer-action model. It’s again a Fatar keybed. Actually, to be honest, the affection for 88-keys in the marketplace I find a bit misleading. On an acoustic piano, the extra octaves add resonance and color the sound. On a digital piano, though, you’re left wondering just who is playing advanced repertoire that uses the octaves (most classical literature doesn’t) … on an electronic piano But I digress.

The cost, as before, is premium – $999 / 999 € / £729 / ¥119800. And that means there’s no earthly reason to spend the extra cash unless you want the control features. (In fact, you can get the same keybed for a fraction of the price if you want, just in a different body.)

So, the important part of this announcement is that the control features are expanded.

Third-party plug-in support arrives. NI announced earlier this year that it wanted Komplete Kontrol to be a “standard.” Rather than just blindly assigning those displays and encoders and touch strips to plug-ins, that means working with plug-in developers to make hardware and software feel like an integrated instrument.

With the version 1.5 update shipping on the 27th of October, developers of Kontakt and VST instruments will map the hardware to their software. The obvious advantage is seeing useful parameters on the encoders, but you get some other customization, too – touch strip control, mappings of scales, chords, and the arpeggiator (not to mention those colored lights). With more sophisticated plug-ins and Kontakt instruments, some of that could in fact be more closely tailored to the available hardware.

There’s an impressive list of plug-in makers – some of whom, interestingly, even directly compete with NI in the software market.

• Arturia
• U-He
• Output Audio
• Soundiron
• Heavyocity
• Spitfire
• ProjectSAM
• Softube
• XILS Lab
• Waldorf
• e-Instruments
• Sonokinetic
• Evolution Series

So, which plug-ins do you get? NI provided CDM with some initial clues:

– Arturia: V Collection
– Heavyocity: Gravity, Aeon
– Spitfire: Albion, HZ 01-03 & more
– Waldorf: Nave et al.
– Softube: Heartbeat et al.
– Sonokinetic: Cappricio et al.
– ProjectSAM: Symphobia et al.

You can make your own custom control mappings. This is actually the bigger news from my perspective. Finally, the control panel lets you assign controls to your own patches. This is huge for Reaktor users, I think – and it finally brings back something we had with the now-defunct Kore on the new keyboard.

The screenshot here is pre-release (and exclusive to CDM) but should be close to the final form.

Honestly, this is the part that makes me want to use this update.

control

Maschine integration is coming. NI are mum on details, but they tell CDM more Maschine goodness is on its way: “Maschine will include all new features in an upcoming update which is currently scheduled to be released shortly after October 27th.”

Incidentally, I’m hopeful that Maschine hardware alone is granted some of the functionality above, meaning you could, for instance, make custom mappings on the Maschine hardware for controlling parameters on a bassline. I haven’t yet seen the update.

Native Instruments finally respond to customer demand for a keyboard that spits out rainbow-colored plug-in logos. (Komplete Kontrol 1.5 software update required.)

Native Instruments finally respond to customer demand for a keyboard that spits out rainbow-colored plug-in logos. (Komplete Kontrol 1.5 software update required.)

Now, all together, sing along – obligatory marketing video. OBLIGATORY MARKETING VIDEO! OH – BLI – GAH – TO – REEE MARK – TING VI – DE – OOOOOOHHHHH!

  • Nice! I have the Maschine Studio and the KK49. It’s a good combo bit have been wondering why I spent so much in it. Glad they’re updating this. I’m pretty excited about the user mapping and the new Maschine features

  • Freeks

    NI Kontroll keyboards = Most expensive controllers. Huge 88-Keyboard with 8 knobs is a joke. They could fit 32 knobs in 88-keyboards.

    • foljs

      So? What would you do with 32 knobs? Or just more is better?

      Especially on a 88 keyboard (which is about PLAYING) more knobs make even less sense. This is for people who rock the keyboard, not for people who press a few keys but mostly change params with the knobs.

      Besides, those are not standard knobs as in most keyboards — they have panels that show the parameters they affect.

      • Yeah, I can’t imagine having more knobs. Organ players might like drawbars, of course… but that’s not really the target market here.

        Of course, then the question for some people looking for hammer action keyboards is whether they really need Komplete Kontrol at all.

        But for people playing a mix of piano sounds and synths, this could still make sense.

        • mercury

          Maybe more knobs is not necessary, but a similar keyboard with 8 knobs, 8 sliders, and 8 switches would be exceptional as it would really make it easy to emulate hardware synths if this VST standard becomes widespread. I hope that is the direction they are going in!

          • Will

            The trifecta of 8 knobs, 8 sliders, 8 buttons should just die already. It’s a relic of Mackie’s (brilliant) HUI and has very little practical use on keyboard/synthesizer controllers.

            I can definitely imagine something like this having more knobs/sliders/buttons but not laid out in groups of eight. Make it a real studio master controller and lay the knobs out like a synthesizer FFS (OSC section, filter section, env section…). Make splits absurdly easy and make the controls track which split you’re on by default.

            88 ain’t a terrible idea for a studio master keyboard. That’s 7 one-octave controllers! Can use the fancy lights to let a player know where the splits are. For a grand, go ahead and add a quick toggle button that sets the entire keyboard and the controls to the split you last touched (and toggles back to split mode when touched agian). Or have four buttons that set some default splits (and back to the default again): 1 octave, two octave, half keyboard and full with FYI lights. Don’t make me think about it—just take my thousand dollars and do something good with it.

            The current state of MIDI controllers is mostly a pile of same old same old less thans. Considering how much of the world uses software based synthesizers and how thoroughly controllers have been commoditized I think there’s definitely space on the market for a premium controller.

            This isn’t it though. Not for me anyway.

          • mercury

            8 knobs, 8 sliders, and 8 switches can get a lot accomplished on most VSTs. I do also wish though that the interface was fully resizable, kind of strange that the VST window is so small even at the largest setting.

          • Will

            Indeed. “Very little practical use” was, perhaps, a little too strong. 🙂

            It’s my frustration at having to remember, each time you load a new soft synth, which knob controls what. They’re totally fine for recording filter sweeps but when making music and your brain says “oh, modulate the pulse width” you spend as much time trying to figure out which slider controls PWM as you would just using the damn screen.

            I’ve even tried to make consistent 8/8/8 setups across different soft synths (1 is always cut off, 2= res, 3=filter envelope amt…) but as soon as the topology of the soft synth changes you still wind up scratching your head.

            No generic controller will ever be 1:1 but synth based controllers can go an awfully long way and bring muscle memory and physicality back into it. Zoom in on an image of a Novation X-station. It’s what we need more of (minus the internal synth and audio interface).

          • mercury

            Actually I agree with you on just about everything but the benefit of the Push and the KK is that there is a screen above the knobs and no muscle memory is needed. If KK would create a similar keyboard with 8 knobs, 8 filters, and 8 buttons that had screens underneath each of the control elements, I think we would finally get very close to a true hardware synth-like experience.

          • Will

            Screens definitely help. I think I’d most like a marriage of the two. A nice robust set of fixed controls for those in the “most subtractive synths have these” camp (see x-station or one of the knobby DSI synths) and some set of controls with a dynamic screen.

            The thing I’m reaching for that screens alone don’t solve, particularly when limited to a set of 8 controls, is muscle memory. On a hardware synth with 1:1 controls your body learns where the controls—you just know where “Filter Cutoff” is and are adjusting it faster than you could read the label. Of course, very few synths share the exact same topology so a marriage of the two (fixed + dynamic) seems like it could be the best of both worlds.

          • Will

            Just drooling over images of the DSI Pro 2 and it’s pretty close to the perfect generic MIDI synthesizer controller. Even has the set of 4 dynamic knobs and buttons! Tweak a few knobs and labels, rip out all of the (lovely) synth guts, add an octave and that’d be a dream controller.

            One spendy addition would be to either a) wrap a ring of lights around each knob (ala BCR) so that you can know what the software is set at vs what you’re knob is set at or b) make the knobs touch sensitive and have the screen tell you.

          • mercury

            Would be very difficult to take care of both issues because VSTs are all over the place. You have a ton of non-analog VSTs. Even simple things, such as, does this VST have 1, 2, 3, 4, or more oscillators, for example, could make any type of preset control system a mess. If you have screens designated, each individual could choose to set things up in a way that made sense for their particular muscle memory.

            I have a Launch Control XL and if it had screens for the control elements, I would probably never buy another controller again for a long time.

          • Anton.a1

            This…I also had the idea that I’d like to see full synth style controls mapped to the main parameters of Komplete or your VST synth of choice. In fact, I’d like them to take it even one step further and knock out a Moog form factor midi controller (think Sub 37 or Voyager). The problem would not be about the functionality or form of the hardware side (Moog already did the homework for them). The problem would be that each soft-synth is presented in a unique way, repackaging the various parameter in a myriad of ways. So your brain would have to make the adjustment of having one solid fixed way to tweak on the hardware, but an ever shifting variety of ways on the software(s).

        • foljs

          That said, it could use a number of touchpads, for the rare bread of classicaly trained pianist that also writes electronic music or scores, and wants to be able to program some drums that way.

          But I think what they want is to push Maschine as complementary to this.

        • Freeks

          8 knobs is problem when using synths. Many synths have 30-60 parameters so with 8 knobs you need to use many pages. I have been using Mashcine many years and it’s problem to edit synths.

          I hope that NI Kontroller 2 will have 8 knobs + 8 faders. 8 faders are great as those are two ADRS controllers. 8 Faders also work with Organ drawbars.

      • Martin Wheeler

        Sure, people who are primarily piano players tend to buy 88 note keyboards ( though as has been pointed out elsewhere, that group probably aren’t your typical Komplete Kontrol users) but 88 note keyboards are also heavily used by people who score, who orchestrate, who like to write with multiple instruments under their hands, whether that be a sampled string quartet spread out over the keyboard or multiple synth / sample voices … many of whom work to.picture … and this group are more ‘natural’ KK adopters (for one thing, they tend to be very heavy Kontakt users, and the vegas christmas lights on these keyboards _are_ very useful with Kontakt – but only if the third party Kontakt patches support them, so that Spitfire et al are on board is important) . My guess is that NI will sell many more of the 88’s to people writing to picture, doing orchestral mockups or who just enjoy writing/playing multitimbrally than they will to classically trained piano virtuosos ‘rocking the keyboard’.
        So to say it ‘makes no sense’ to have more KK control knobs … makes no sense … as for people running multitimbral scoring rigs etc etc, having instant access to 16 or 32 parameters instead of just 8 would actually be very useful.
        However, for me the big issue with KK right now is that, although it adds much useful functionality, having that extra KK layer also tends to slow things down. Ni really need to think about optimising the UI of the KK layer so it stays out of your way until you want it.

  • Nice! I have the Maschine Studio and the KK49. It’s a good combo bit have been wondering why I spent so much in it. Glad they’re updating this. I’m pretty excited about the user mapping and the new Maschine features

  • Freeks

    NI Kontroll keyboards = Most expensive controllers. Huge 88-Keyboard with 8 knobs is a joke. They could fit 32 knobs in 88-keyboards.

    • foljs

      So? What would you do with 32 knobs? Or just more is better?

      Especially on a 88 keyboard (which is about PLAYING) more knobs make even less sense. This is for people who rock the keyboard, not for people who press a few keys but mostly change params with the knobs.

      Besides, those are not standard knobs as in most keyboards — they have panels that show the parameters they affect.

      • Yeah, I can’t imagine having more knobs. Organ players might like drawbars, of course… but that’s not really the target market here.

        Of course, then the question for some people looking for hammer action keyboards is whether they really need Komplete Kontrol at all.

        But for people playing a mix of piano sounds and synths, this could still make sense.

        • mercury

          Maybe more knobs is not necessary, but a similar keyboard with 8 knobs, 8 sliders, and 8 switches would be exceptional as it would really make it easy to emulate hardware synths if this VST standard becomes widespread. I hope that is the direction they are going in!

          • Will

            The trifecta of 8 knobs, 8 sliders, 8 buttons should just die already. It’s a relic of Mackie’s (brilliant) HUI and has very little practical use on keyboard/synthesizer controllers.

            I can definitely imagine something like this having more knobs/sliders/buttons but not laid out in groups of eight. Make it a real studio master controller and lay the knobs out like a synthesizer FFS (OSC section, filter section, env section…). Make splits absurdly easy and make the controls track which split you’re on by default.

            88 ain’t a terrible idea for a studio master keyboard. That’s 7 one-octave controllers! Can use the fancy lights to let a player know where the splits are. For a grand, go ahead and add a quick toggle button that sets the entire keyboard and the controls to the split you last touched (and toggles back to split mode when touched agian). Or have four buttons that set some default splits (and back to the default again): 1 octave, two octave, half keyboard and full with FYI lights. Don’t make me think about it—just take my thousand dollars and do something good with it.

            The current state of MIDI controllers is mostly a pile of same old same old less thans. Considering how much of the world uses software based synthesizers and how thoroughly controllers have been commoditized I think there’s definitely space on the market for a premium controller.

            This isn’t it though. Not for me anyway.

          • mercury

            8 knobs, 8 sliders, and 8 switches can get a lot accomplished on most VSTs. I do also wish though that the interface was fully resizable, kind of strange that the VST window is so small even at the largest setting.

          • Will

            Indeed. “Very little practical use” was, perhaps, a little too strong. 🙂

            It’s my frustration at having to remember, each time you load a new soft synth, which knob controls what. They’re totally fine for recording filter sweeps but when making music and your brain says “oh, modulate the pulse width” you spend as much time trying to figure out which slider controls PWM as you would just using the damn screen.

            I’ve even tried to make consistent 8/8/8 setups across different soft synths (1 is always cut off, 2= res, 3=filter envelope amt…) but as soon as the topology of the soft synth changes you still wind up scratching your head.

            No generic controller will ever be 1:1 but synth based controllers can go an awfully long way and bring muscle memory and physicality back into it. Zoom in on an image of a Novation X-station. It’s what we need more of (minus the internal synth and audio interface).

          • mercury

            Actually I agree with you on just about everything but the benefit of the Push and the KK is that there is a screen above the knobs and no muscle memory is needed. If KK would create a similar keyboard with 8 knobs, 8 filters, and 8 buttons that had screens underneath each of the control elements, I think we would finally get very close to a true hardware synth-like experience.

          • Will

            Screens definitely help. I think I’d most like a marriage of the two. A nice robust set of fixed controls for those in the “most subtractive synths have these” camp (see x-station or one of the knobby DSI synths) and some set of controls with a dynamic screen.

            The thing I’m reaching for that screens alone don’t solve, particularly when limited to a set of 8 controls, is muscle memory. On a hardware synth with 1:1 controls your body learns where the controls—you just know where “Filter Cutoff” is and are adjusting it faster than you could read the label. Of course, very few synths share the exact same topology so a marriage of the two (fixed + dynamic) seems like it could be the best of both worlds.

          • Will

            Just drooling over images of the DSI Pro 2 and it’s pretty close to the perfect generic MIDI synthesizer controller. Even has the set of 4 dynamic knobs and buttons! Tweak a few knobs and labels, rip out all of the (lovely) synth guts, add an octave and that’d be a dream controller.

            One spendy addition would be to either a) wrap a ring of lights around each knob (ala BCR) so that you can know what the software is set at vs what you’re knob is set at or b) make the knobs touch sensitive and have the screen tell you.

          • mercury

            Would be very difficult to take care of both issues because VSTs are all over the place. You have a ton of non-analog VSTs. Even simple things, such as, does this VST have 1, 2, 3, 4, or more oscillators, for example, could make any type of preset control system a mess. If you have screens designated, each individual could choose to set things up in a way that made sense for their particular muscle memory.

            I have a Launch Control XL and if it had screens for the control elements, I would probably never buy another controller again for a long time.

          • Anton.a1

            This…I also had the idea that I’d like to see full synth style controls mapped to the main parameters of Komplete or your VST synth of choice. In fact, I’d like them to take it even one step further and knock out a Moog form factor midi controller (think Sub 37 or Voyager).

            The problem would not be about the functionality or form of the hardware side (Moog already did the homework for them). The problem would be that each soft-synth is presented in a unique way, repackaging the various parameter in a myriad of ways. So your brain would have to make the adjustment of having one solid fixed way to tweak on the hardware, but an ever shifting variety of ways on the software(s).

            That challenge could be mitigated if the hardware buttons were touch and bi-directional. That is, the software recognized which parameter was being touched and automatically presented it to you on the computer screen (or hardware screen if they go that route).

            Furthermore, the way the market is going with onboard touchscreen would make it even easier. You’d touch the hardware knob and could make fine tweaks to the parameters directly on the hardware touch screen.

        • foljs

          That said, it could use a number of touchpads, for the rare bread of classicaly trained pianist that also writes electronic music or scores, and wants to be able to program some drums that way.

          But I think what they want is to push Maschine as complementary to this.

        • Freeks

          8 knobs is problem when using synths. Many synths have 30-60 parameters so with 8 knobs you need to use many pages. I have been using Mashcine many years and it’s problem to edit synths.

          I hope that NI Kontroller 2 will have 8 knobs + 8 faders. 8 faders are great as those are two ADRS controllers. 8 Faders also work with Organ drawbars.

      • Martin Wheeler

        Sure, people who are primarily piano players tend to buy 88 note keyboards ( though as has been pointed out elsewhere, that group probably aren’t your typical Komplete Kontrol users) but 88 note keyboards are also heavily used by people who score, who orchestrate, who like to write with multiple instruments under their hands, whether that be a sampled string quartet spread out over the keyboard or multiple synth / sample voices … many of whom work to.picture … and this group are more ‘natural’ KK adopters (for one thing, they tend to be very heavy Kontakt users, and the vegas christmas lights on these keyboards _are_ very useful with Kontakt – but only if the third party Kontakt patches support them, so that Spitfire et al are on board is important) . My guess is that NI will sell many more of the 88’s to people writing to picture, doing orchestral mockups or who just enjoy writing/playing multitimbrally than they will to classically trained piano virtuosos ‘rocking the keyboard’.
        So to say it ‘makes no sense’ to have more KK control knobs … makes no sense … as for people running multitimbral scoring rigs etc etc, having instant access to 16 or 32 parameters instead of just 8 would actually be very useful.
        However, for me the big issue with KK right now is that, although it adds much useful functionality, having that extra KK layer also tends to slow things down. Ni really need to think about optimising the UI of the KK layer so it stays out of your way until you want it.

  • Nice! I have the Maschine Studio and the KK49. It’s a good combo bit have been wondering why I spent so much in it. Glad they’re updating this. I’m pretty excited about the user mapping and the new Maschine features

  • Freeks

    NI Kontroll keyboards = Most expensive controllers. Huge 88-Keyboard with 8 knobs is a joke. They could fit 32 knobs in 88-keyboards.

    • foljs

      So? What would you do with 32 knobs? Or just more is better?

      Especially on a 88 keyboard (which is about PLAYING) more knobs make even less sense. This is for people who rock the keyboard, not for people who press a few keys but mostly change params with the knobs.

      Besides, those are not standard knobs as in most keyboards — they have panels that show the parameters they affect.

      • Yeah, I can’t imagine having more knobs. Organ players might like drawbars, of course… but that’s not really the target market here.

        Of course, then the question for some people looking for hammer action keyboards is whether they really need Komplete Kontrol at all.

        But for people playing a mix of piano sounds and synths, this could still make sense.

        • mercury

          Maybe more knobs is not necessary, but a similar keyboard with 8 knobs, 8 sliders, and 8 switches would be exceptional as it would really make it easy to emulate hardware synths if this VST standard becomes widespread. I hope that is the direction they are going in!

          • Will

            The trifecta of 8 knobs, 8 sliders, 8 buttons should just die already. It’s a relic of Mackie’s (brilliant) HUI and has very little practical use on keyboard/synthesizer controllers.

            I can definitely imagine something like this having more knobs/sliders/buttons but not laid out in groups of eight. Make it a real studio master controller and lay the knobs out like a synthesizer FFS (OSC section, filter section, env section…). Make splits absurdly easy and make the controls track which split you’re on by default.

            88 ain’t a terrible idea for a studio master keyboard. That’s 7 one-octave controllers! Can use the fancy lights to let a player know where the splits are. For a grand, go ahead and add a quick toggle button that sets the entire keyboard and the controls to the split you last touched (and toggles back to split mode when touched agian). Or have four buttons that set some default splits (and back to the default again): 1 octave, two octave, half keyboard and full with FYI lights. Don’t make me think about it—just take my thousand dollars and do something good with it.

            The current state of MIDI controllers is mostly a pile of same old same old less thans. Considering how much of the world uses software based synthesizers and how thoroughly controllers have been commoditized I think there’s definitely space on the market for a premium controller.

            This isn’t it though. Not for me anyway.

          • mercury

            8 knobs, 8 sliders, and 8 switches can get a lot accomplished on most VSTs. I do also wish though that the interface was fully resizable, kind of strange that the VST window is so small even at the largest setting.

          • Will

            Indeed. “Very little practical use” was, perhaps, a little too strong. 🙂

            It’s my frustration at having to remember, each time you load a new soft synth, which knob controls what. They’re totally fine for recording filter sweeps but when making music and your brain says “oh, modulate the pulse width” you spend as much time trying to figure out which slider controls PWM as you would just using the damn screen.

            I’ve even tried to make consistent 8/8/8 setups across different soft synths (1 is always cut off, 2= res, 3=filter envelope amt…) but as soon as the topology of the soft synth changes you still wind up scratching your head.

            No generic controller will ever be 1:1 but synth based controllers can go an awfully long way and bring muscle memory and physicality back into it. Zoom in on an image of a Novation X-station. It’s what we need more of (minus the internal synth and audio interface).

          • mercury

            Actually I agree with you on just about everything but the benefit of the Push and the KK is that there is a screen above the knobs and no muscle memory is needed. If KK would create a similar keyboard with 8 knobs, 8 filters, and 8 buttons that had screens underneath each of the control elements, I think we would finally get very close to a true hardware synth-like experience.

          • Will

            Screens definitely help. I think I’d most like a marriage of the two. A nice robust set of fixed controls for those in the “most subtractive synths have these” camp (see x-station or one of the knobby DSI synths) and some set of controls with a dynamic screen.

            The thing I’m reaching for that screens alone don’t solve, particularly when limited to a set of 8 controls, is muscle memory. On a hardware synth with 1:1 controls your body learns where the controls—you just know where “Filter Cutoff” is and are adjusting it faster than you could read the label. Of course, very few synths share the exact same topology so a marriage of the two (fixed + dynamic) seems like it could be the best of both worlds.

          • Will

            Just drooling over images of the DSI Pro 2 and it’s pretty close to the perfect generic MIDI synthesizer controller. Even has the set of 4 dynamic knobs and buttons! Tweak a few knobs and labels, rip out all of the (lovely) synth guts, add an octave and that’d be a dream controller.

            One spendy addition would be to either a) wrap a ring of lights around each knob (ala BCR) so that you can know what the software is set at vs what you’re knob is set at or b) make the knobs touch sensitive and have the screen tell you.

          • mercury

            Would be very difficult to take care of both issues because VSTs are all over the place. You have a ton of non-analog VSTs. Even simple things, such as, does this VST have 1, 2, 3, 4, or more oscillators, for example, could make any type of preset control system a mess. If you have screens designated, each individual could choose to set things up in a way that made sense for their particular muscle memory.

            I have a Launch Control XL and if it had screens for the control elements, I would probably never buy another controller again for a long time.

          • Anton.a1

            This…I also had the idea that I’d like to see full synth style controls mapped to the main parameters of Komplete or your VST synth of choice. In fact, I’d like them to take it even one step further and knock out a Moog form factor midi controller (think Sub 37 or Voyager).

            The problem would not be about the functionality or form of the hardware side (Moog already did the homework for them). The problem would be that each soft-synth is presented in a unique way, repackaging the various parameter in a myriad of ways. So your brain would have to make the adjustment of having one solid fixed way to tweak on the hardware, but an ever shifting variety of ways on the software(s).

            That challenge could be mitigated if the hardware buttons were touch and bi-directional. That is, the software recognized which parameter was being touched and automatically presented it to you on the computer screen (or hardware screen if they go that route).

            Furthermore, the way the market is going with onboard touchscreen would make it even easier. You’d touch the hardware knob and could make fine tweaks to the parameters directly on the hardware touch screen.

        • foljs

          That said, it could use a number of touchpads, for the rare bread of classicaly trained pianist that also writes electronic music or scores, and wants to be able to program some drums that way.

          But I think what they want is to push Maschine as complementary to this.

        • Freeks

          8 knobs is problem when using synths. Many synths have 30-60 parameters so with 8 knobs you need to use many pages. I have been using Mashcine many years and it’s problem to edit synths.

          I hope that NI Kontroller 2 will have 8 knobs + 8 faders. 8 faders are great as those are two ADRS controllers. 8 Faders also work with Organ drawbars.

      • Martin Wheeler

        Sure, people who are primarily piano players tend to buy 88 note keyboards ( though as has been pointed out elsewhere, that group probably aren’t your typical Komplete Kontrol users) but 88 note keyboards are also heavily used by people who score, who orchestrate, who like to write with multiple instruments under their hands, whether that be a sampled string quartet spread out over the keyboard or multiple synth / sample voices … many of whom work to.picture … and this group are more ‘natural’ KK adopters (for one thing, they tend to be very heavy Kontakt users, and the vegas christmas lights on these keyboards _are_ very useful with Kontakt – but only if the third party Kontakt patches support them, so that Spitfire et al are on board is important) . My guess is that NI will sell many more of the 88’s to people writing to picture, doing orchestral mockups or who just enjoy writing/playing multitimbrally than they will to classically trained piano virtuosos ‘rocking the keyboard’.
        So to say it ‘makes no sense’ to have more KK control knobs … makes no sense … as for people running multitimbral scoring rigs etc etc, having instant access to 16 or 32 parameters instead of just 8 would actually be very useful.
        However, for me the big issue with KK right now is that, although it adds much useful functionality, having that extra KK layer also tends to slow things down. Ni really need to think about optimising the UI of the KK layer so it stays out of your way until you want it.

  • Will

    At first I thought “So, which plug-ins do you get?” meant that list of software was going to be bundled with the controller and suddenly it seemed like the best deal on the market.

  • Will

    At first I thought “So, which plug-ins do you get?” meant that list of software was going to be bundled with the controller and suddenly it seemed like the best deal on the market.

  • Will

    At first I thought “So, which plug-ins do you get?” meant that list of software was going to be bundled with the controller and suddenly it seemed like the best deal on the market.

  • Evan Arnett

    These keyboards are amazing for Kontakt users. The key lighting allows you to see the range of the instrument you’re playing without having to look at the screen-very useful for orchestral writing in particular. And many Kontakt instruments have the keys color-mapped to indicate sample articulations, kits vs key switches, etc. I could see this weighted 88-note board becoming a new standard for scoring.

  • Evan Arnett

    These keyboards are amazing for Kontakt users. The key lighting allows you to see the range of the instrument you’re playing without having to look at the screen-very useful for orchestral writing in particular. And many Kontakt instruments have the keys color-mapped to indicate sample articulations, kits vs key switches, etc. I could see this weighted 88-note board becoming a new standard for scoring.

    For that price, though, I would have liked to see 16 or more knobs. My Keystation Pro 88 has a huge array of knobs, but without dynamic labels they are mostly useless. This technology could potentially give users intuitive hands-on control of most parameters of their entire soft synth library-finally!

  • Evan Arnett

    These keyboards are amazing for Kontakt users. The key lighting allows you to see the range of the instrument you’re playing without having to look at the screen-very useful for orchestral writing in particular. And many Kontakt instruments have the keys color-mapped to indicate sample articulations, kits vs key switches, etc. I could see this weighted 88-note board becoming a new standard for scoring.

    For that price, though, I would have liked to see 16 or more knobs. My Keystation Pro 88 has a huge array of knobs, but without dynamic labels they are mostly useless. This technology could potentially give users intuitive hands-on control of most parameters of their entire soft synth library-finally!

  • Will Copps

    I’m seeing 32 bit for VST plugins on the site, but I’m unclear–is there both a client for 32-bit DAWs and 64-bit DAWs? Does the 64-bit work as a wrapper?

    • Will Copps

      NI was explicit that this did not work for 32 bit last go around, so I’m excited either way…

      • It does indeed work as a wrapper; confirmed that with them last-time. So it can act as a 32-to-64-bit bridge, unless I’m mistaken.

        • Will Copps

          Huge news, thanks Peter!

          • mercury

            The last 32 bit version had a defect (KK 1.2) where it wouldn’t upgrade all of the VSTs properly so Reaktor 6 would not show up. They said they will hopefully have it fixed in the next version.

        • Anton.a1

          B-Righteous (forum Mod for Maschine on the N.I. forums) says:

          “No, not a bit bridge. It can host VST in an AU host like Logic though.”

          • Thanks for this. Yeah, I had confirmed it bridges VST/AU… but then I’m surprised by the 32-bit support if that isn’t the case?

          • Anton.a1

            Guess we’ll find out soon enough…lot’s of stuff in motion and sure to change over the next year or so…interesting times!

          • Will Copps

            I shot their customer service a note to ask about the extent of support. I’ll update if I hear anything.

          • Will Copps

            From NI:

            The KOMPLETE KONTROL software is available in 32 bit and 64 bit versions for PCs
            (VST and AAX format).

            If your DAW is a 64 bit DAW, you´ll have to use the 64 bit KOMPLETE KONTROL
            version – and this version also only works with 64 bit plug in versions.

            If you have a 32 bit DAW, you may use 32 bit plug in versions in the 32 bit
            KOMPLETE KONTROL software.

            KOMPLETE KONTROL software does not double up as a bridge.

          • Anton.a1

            Thanks for clarifying Will.

  • Will Copps

    I’m seeing 32 bit for VST plugins on the site, but I’m unclear–is there both a client for 32-bit DAWs and 64-bit DAWs? Does the 64-bit work as a wrapper?

    • Will Copps

      NI was explicit that this did not work for 32 bit last go around, so I’m excited either way…

      • It does indeed work as a wrapper; confirmed that with them last-time. So it can act as a 32-to-64-bit bridge, unless I’m mistaken.

        • Will Copps

          Huge news, thanks Peter!

          • mercury

            The last 32 bit version had a defect (KK 1.2) where it wouldn’t upgrade all of the VSTs properly so Reaktor 6 would not show up. They said they will hopefully have it fixed in the next version.

        • Anton.a1

          B-Righteous (forum Mod for Maschine on the N.I. forums) says:

          “No, not a bit bridge. It can host VST in an AU host like Logic though.”

          • Thanks for this. Yeah, I had confirmed it bridges VST/AU… but then I’m surprised by the 32-bit support if that isn’t the case?

          • Anton.a1

            Guess we’ll find out soon enough…lot’s of stuff in motion and sure to change over the next year or so…interesting times!

          • Will Copps

            I shot their customer service a note to ask about the extent of support. I’ll update if I hear anything.

          • Will Copps

            From NI:

            The KOMPLETE KONTROL software is available in 32 bit and 64 bit versions for PCs
            (VST and AAX format).

            If your DAW is a 64 bit DAW, you´ll have to use the 64 bit KOMPLETE KONTROL
            version – and this version also only works with 64 bit plug in versions.

            If you have a 32 bit DAW, you may use 32 bit plug in versions in the 32 bit
            KOMPLETE KONTROL software.

            KOMPLETE KONTROL software does not double up as a bridge.

          • Anton.a1

            Thanks for clarifying Will.

  • Will Copps

    I’m seeing 32 bit for VST plugins on the site, but I’m unclear–is there both a client for 32-bit DAWs and 64-bit DAWs? Does the 64-bit work as a wrapper?

    • Will Copps

      NI was explicit that this did not work for 32 bit last go around, so I’m excited either way…

      • It does indeed work as a wrapper; confirmed that with them last-time. So it can act as a 32-to-64-bit bridge, unless I’m mistaken.

        • Will Copps

          Huge news, thanks Peter!

          • mercury

            The last 32 bit version had a defect (KK 1.2) where it wouldn’t upgrade all of the VSTs properly so Reaktor 6 would not show up. They said they will hopefully have it fixed in the next version.

        • Anton.a1

          B-Righteous (forum Mod for Maschine on the N.I. forums) says:

          “No, not a bit bridge. It can host VST in an AU host like Logic though.”

          • Thanks for this. Yeah, I had confirmed it bridges VST/AU… but then I’m surprised by the 32-bit support if that isn’t the case?

          • Anton.a1

            Guess we’ll find out soon enough…lot’s of stuff in motion and sure to change over the next year or so…interesting times!

          • Will Copps

            I shot their customer service a note to ask about the extent of support. I’ll update if I hear anything.

          • Will Copps

            From NI:

            The KOMPLETE KONTROL software is available in 32 bit and 64 bit versions for PCs
            (VST and AAX format).

            If your DAW is a 64 bit DAW, you´ll have to use the 64 bit KOMPLETE KONTROL
            version – and this version also only works with 64 bit plug in versions.

            If you have a 32 bit DAW, you may use 32 bit plug in versions in the 32 bit
            KOMPLETE KONTROL software.

            KOMPLETE KONTROL software does not double up as a bridge.

          • Anton.a1

            Thanks for clarifying Will.

  • narwhale

    Can’t believe they haven’t already approached Spectrasonics so I guess that was a “no” from Eric Persing. Frankly, without them this is going to have limited appeal to the pro – pretty much anyone in the market for an 88 note controller is going to be an Omnisphere user. NI really need to improve the basics of Komplete Kontrol for those of us who haven’t got time to waste trawling through endless patch lists. Implement a randomise function in the browser – in fact, display patches in random order by default instead of alphabetically so that we get beyond a or b before giving up scrolling and ending up using the same old sounds. And for crying out loud SPEED UP THE LOADING TIME! Waiting for each instrument to load whilst simply browsing patches for inspiration is, as it stands, utterly hopeless. And, oh yeah, how about giving us the ability to actually, you know, SAVE patches? I want to love KK but could this be Kore mk2??

    • Andy

      Well Kore 2 had a preview function which made browsing fast. So no, this is Kore 1.5. I still cannot believe we are discussing reinventing the Kore wheel and N.I got away with it! Kore has 8 buttons, morphing and a superior library. Long way to go yet!

      • narwhale

        Actually I was referencing Kore as being an over-ambitious failure!

        • Apoclypse

          It was a failure for sure. If only for because NI had no idea what to do with it. They wanted to market it a s a live tool, then a patch organizer and finally they just wanted to sell soundpacks and overloaded the darn thing to the point that it became unwieldy to develop and manage. Kore at it’s core (heh) was a brilliant piece of software and a great idea, it’s just that NI was transitioning and in that transition they have essentially turned into a gadgets company. Who can blame them, the margins are higher there and they can essentially re-sell hardware to their customers over and over again with built in obsolescence.

        • heinrich

          i kind of would have to agree with that, especially since they unfortunately did not see it thru..it sure was to complex for most users already.

    • butt dirt

      omnisphere is the lamest vsti of them all, made for dads who work in the entertainment industry, pumping out Kidz Bop and breakfast cereal jingles at financial-gunpoint, dreaming of someday getting a direct position with the company, instead of having the employment agency standing in the way of their hopeless retirement plan

      if i needed samples of a piano on fire i would set a piano on fire

      • narwhale

        No, actually it’s the greatest synth of them all – hardware or software – made for us dads who write library music, pumping out the two-steps-behind-the-cutting-edge, fabulous-sounding, utterly generic, formula-driven mini-masterpieces you hear everywhere every day, in our tastefully appointed country house studios… only when we feel like it though, because, of course, our Spectrasonics and Native Instruments-funded retirement plans have kicked in early.

        If I needed trolling by some redundant idealist who’s all worked up about artistic integrity and, in all probability, Real Analogue Synthesis, then it would be pertinent for him to possess a level of repartee that is a little (actually a lot) more, you know, devastating.

        • Name User

          naw bruh, all hardware is commodity fetishism, much like your acoustically treated shack that’s itching to get reappropriated by my dialectical materialist posse

          it’s not trolling if it comes from the heart, if a wave editor or tracker isn’t enough for you then Synth1 or Blaukraut’s Charlatan are powerful enough to take on any preset flipping Omnisphere dweeb

          this is butt dirt btw, aka cool nutts

          • narwhale

            Your earnest competitiveness I find vaguely amusing and your wilful anarcho-obscurist-minimalist-fundamentalist taste in musical tools and societal outlook holds absolutely no interest for me whatsoever (what on earth made you think that it would?) but please be in no doubt about this – my studio will NEVER have any form of acoustic treatment – that hideous grey foam would clash disastrously with the Farrow and Ball on the walls and the artfully distressed ceiling beams.

        • heinrich

          sounds like you are more into using presets for quick results than making some sounds…to each one his own my friend.

    • heinrich

      As far as i know Kontakt is pretty much THE industry standard for samplers and very popular among professionals in the movie industry….so i’m not sure what professionals you’re referring to.

      • Martin Wheeler

        Kontakt is certainly _a_ standard in film scoring, because there are so many of the top sample library companies who use the format. But Omnisphere is pretty much a standard in that world too, and ( except for those people doing orchestral music /mockups exclusively ) then I would think that the majority of people working professionally in film music that use Kontakt would tend to have Omnisphere too. At least, in a statistically insignificant sample of myself and the handful of other film music composers that I know, that is certainly the case. Not having Spectrasonics on board will certainly not kill this, but it would be great for the user if that were ever to become the case. But Eric & Cie often do seem to go their own special way …

  • narwhale

    Can’t believe they haven’t already approached Spectrasonics so I guess that was a “no” from Eric Persing. Frankly, without them this is going to have limited appeal to the pro – pretty much anyone in the market for an 88 note controller is going to be an Omnisphere user. NI really need to improve the basics of Komplete Kontrol for those of us who haven’t got time to waste trawling through endless patch lists. Implement a randomise function in the browser – in fact, display patches in random order by default instead of alphabetically so that we get beyond a or b before giving up scrolling and ending up using the same old sounds. And for crying out loud SPEED UP THE LOADING TIME! Waiting for each instrument to load whilst simply browsing patches for inspiration is, as it stands, utterly hopeless. And, oh yeah, how about giving us the ability to actually, you know, SAVE patches? I want to love KK but could this be Kore mk2??

    • Andy

      Well Kore 2 had a preview function which made browsing fast. So no, this is Kore 1.5. I still cannot believe we are discussing reinventing the Kore wheel and N.I got away with it! Kore has 8 buttons, morphing and a superior library. Long way to go yet!

      • narwhale

        Actually I was referencing Kore as being an over-ambitious failure!

        • Apoclypse

          It was a failure for sure. If only for because NI had no idea what to do with it. They wanted to market it a s a live tool, then a patch organizer and finally they just wanted to sell soundpacks and overloaded the darn thing to the point that it became unwieldy to develop and manage. Kore at it’s core (heh) was a brilliant piece of software and a great idea, it’s just that NI was transitioning and in that transition they have essentially turned into a gadgets company. Who can blame them, the margins are higher there and they can essentially re-sell hardware to their customers over and over again with built in obsolescence.

        • heinrich

          i kind of would have to agree with that, especially since they unfortunately did not see it thru..it sure was to complex for most users already.

    • butt dirt

      omnisphere is the lamest vsti of them all, made for dads who work in the entertainment industry, pumping out Kidz Bop and breakfast cereal jingles at financial-gunpoint, dreaming of someday getting a direct position with the company, instead of having the employment agency standing in the way of their hopeless retirement plan

      if i needed samples of a piano on fire i would set a piano on fire

      • narwhale

        No, actually it’s the greatest synth of them all – hardware or software – made for us dads who write library music, pumping out the two-steps-behind-the-cutting-edge, fabulous-sounding, utterly generic, formula-driven mini-masterpieces you hear everywhere every day, in our tastefully appointed country house studios… only when we feel like it though, because, of course, our Spectrasonics and Native Instruments-funded retirement plans have kicked in early.

        If I needed trolling by some redundant idealist who’s all worked up about artistic integrity and, in all probability, Real Analogue Synthesis, then it would be pertinent for him to possess a level of repartee that is a little (actually a lot) more, you know, devastating.

        • Name User

          naw bruh, all hardware is commodity fetishism, much like your acoustically treated shack that’s itching to get reappropriated by my dialectical materialist posse

          it’s not trolling if it comes from the heart, if a wave editor or tracker isn’t enough for you then Synth1 or Blaukraut’s Charlatan are powerful enough to take on any preset flipping Omnisphere dweeb

          this is butt dirt btw, aka cool nutts

          • narwhale

            Your earnest competitiveness I find vaguely amusing and your wilful anarcho-obscurist-minimalist-fundamentalist taste in musical tools and societal outlook holds absolutely no interest for me whatsoever (what on earth made you think that it would?) but please be in no doubt about this – my studio will NEVER have any form of acoustic treatment – that hideous grey foam would clash disastrously with the Farrow and Ball on the walls and the artfully distressed ceiling beams.

        • heinrich

          sounds like you are more into using presets for quick results than making some sounds…to each one his own my friend.

    • heinrich

      As far as i know Kontakt is pretty much THE industry standard for samplers and very popular among professionals in the movie industry….so i’m not sure what professionals you’re referring to.

      • Martin Wheeler

        Kontakt is certainly _a_ standard in film scoring, because there are so many of the top sample library companies who use the format. But Omnisphere is pretty much a standard in that world too, and ( except for those people doing orchestral music /mockups exclusively ) then I would think that the majority of people working professionally in film music that use Kontakt would tend to have Omnisphere too. At least, in a statistically insignificant sample of myself and the handful of other film music composers that I know, that is certainly the case. Not having Spectrasonics on board will certainly not kill this, but it would be great for the user if that were ever to become the case. But Eric & Cie often do seem to go their own special way …

  • narwhale

    Can’t believe they haven’t already approached Spectrasonics so I guess that was a “no” from Eric Persing. Frankly, without them this is going to have limited appeal to the pro – pretty much anyone in the market for an 88 note controller is going to be an Omnisphere user. NI really need to improve the basics of Komplete Kontrol for those of us who haven’t got time to waste trawling through endless patch lists. Implement a randomise function in the browser – in fact, display patches in random order by default instead of alphabetically so that we get beyond a or b before giving up scrolling and ending up using the same old sounds. And for crying out loud SPEED UP THE LOADING TIME! Waiting for each instrument to load whilst simply browsing patches for inspiration is, as it stands, utterly hopeless. And, oh yeah, how about giving us the ability to actually, you know, SAVE patches? I want to love KK but could this be Kore mk2??

    • Andy

      Well Kore 2 had a preview function which made browsing fast. So no, this is Kore 1.5. I still cannot believe we are discussing reinventing the Kore wheel and N.I got away with it! Kore has 8 buttons, morphing and a superior library. Long way to go yet!

      • narwhale

        Actually I was referencing Kore as being an over-ambitious failure!

        • Apoclypse

          It was a failure for sure. If only for because NI had no idea what to do with it. They wanted to market it a s a live tool, then a patch organizer and finally they just wanted to sell soundpacks and overloaded the darn thing to the point that it became unwieldy to develop and manage. Kore at it’s core (heh) was a brilliant piece of software and a great idea, it’s just that NI was transitioning and in that transition they have essentially turned into a gadgets company. Who can blame them, the margins are higher there and they can essentially re-sell hardware to their customers over and over again with built in obsolescence.

        • heinrich

          i kind of would have to agree with that, especially since they unfortunately did not see it thru..it sure was to complex for most users already.

    • butt dirt

      omnisphere is the lamest vsti of them all, made for dads who work in the entertainment industry, pumping out Kidz Bop and breakfast cereal jingles at financial-gunpoint, dreaming of someday getting a direct position with the company, instead of having the employment agency standing in the way of their hopeless retirement plan

      if i needed samples of a piano on fire i would set a piano on fire

      • narwhale

        No, actually it’s the greatest synth of them all – hardware or software – made for us dads who write library music, pumping out the two-steps-behind-the-cutting-edge, fabulous-sounding, utterly generic, formula-driven mini-masterpieces you hear everywhere every day, in our tastefully appointed country house studios… only when we feel like it though, because, of course, our Spectrasonics and Native Instruments-funded retirement plans have kicked in early.

        If I needed trolling by some redundant idealist who’s all worked up about artistic integrity and, in all probability, Real Analogue Synthesis, then it would be pertinent for him to possess a level of repartee that is a little (actually a lot) more, you know, devastating.

        • disqus_nURY1n6kAG

          naw bruh, all hardware is commodity fetishism, much like your acoustically treated shack that’s itching to get reappropriated by my dialectical materialist posse

          it’s not trolling if it comes from the heart, if a wave editor or tracker isn’t enough for you then Synth1 or Blaukraut’s Charlatan are powerful enough to take on any preset flipping Omnisphere dweeb

          this is butt dirt btw, aka cool nutts

          • narwhale

            Your earnest competitiveness I find vaguely amusing and your wilful anarcho-obscurist-minimalist-fundamentalist taste in musical tools and societal outlook holds absolutely no interest for me whatsoever (what on earth made you think that it would?) but please be in no doubt about this – my studio will NEVER have any form of acoustic treatment – that hideous grey foam would clash disastrously with the Farrow and Ball on the walls and the artfully distressed ceiling beams.

        • heinrich

          sounds like you are more into using presets for quick results than making some sounds…to each one his own my friend.

    • heinrich

      As far as i know Kontakt is pretty much THE industry standard for samplers and very popular among professionals in the movie industry….so i’m not sure what professionals you’re referring to.

      • Martin Wheeler

        Kontakt is certainly _a_ standard in film scoring, because there are so many of the top sample library companies who use the format. But Omnisphere is pretty much a standard in that world too, and ( except for those people doing orchestral music /mockups exclusively ) then I would think that the majority of people working professionally in film music that use Kontakt would tend to have Omnisphere too. At least, in a statistically insignificant sample of myself and the handful of other film music composers that I know, that is certainly the case. Not having Spectrasonics on board will certainly not kill this, but it would be great for the user if that were ever to become the case. But Eric & Cie often do seem to go their own special way …

  • Here’s why I bought and sold the S61 that I owned for about a week and went back to my trusty ReMOTE 37SL. A) Couldn’t control my DAW with it – the Novation works seamlessly with Ableton. This is a huge deal with a master ‘kontroller’ – yeah sure control over NI’s armada of software is great, but I want faders and mute-solo buttons to talk to DAWs. All there is right now is a transport control. Is this gonna change? B) couldn’t change the polarity of the damper pedal in either the software or hardware – pretty huge oversight for the be-all end-all of controllers…

    I do TV/ad music for a living and workflow is everything when time is of the essence. The new NI controllers are beautiful and I so wanted to keep mine – the TRON lights are to die for, but not enough to keep me attached to mine. But the reality of it is, it slowed me down. And the fact that everything has to be wrapped in that ‘kontrol’ VST in order to work? Really? Way too much like Kore and all its problems. Meh.

  • Here’s why I bought and sold the S61 that I owned for about a week and went back to my trusty ReMOTE 37SL. A) Couldn’t control my DAW with it – the Novation works seamlessly with Ableton. This is a huge deal with a master ‘kontroller’ – yeah sure control over NI’s armada of software is great, but I want faders and mute-solo buttons to talk to DAWs. All there is right now is a transport control. Is this gonna change? B) couldn’t change the polarity of the damper pedal in either the software or hardware – pretty huge oversight for the be-all end-all of controllers…

    I do TV/ad music for a living and workflow is everything when time is of the essence. The new NI controllers are beautiful and I so wanted to keep mine – the TRON lights are to die for, but not enough to keep me attached to mine. But the reality of it is, it slowed me down. And the fact that everything has to be wrapped in that ‘kontrol’ VST in order to work? Really? Way too much like Kore and all its problems. Meh.

  • Here’s why I bought and sold the S61 that I owned for about a week and went back to my trusty ReMOTE 37SL. A) Couldn’t control my DAW with it – the Novation works seamlessly with Ableton. This is a huge deal with a master ‘kontroller’ – yeah sure control over NI’s armada of software is great, but I want faders and mute-solo buttons to talk to DAWs. All there is right now is a transport control. Is this gonna change? B) couldn’t change the polarity of the damper pedal in either the software or hardware – pretty huge oversight for the be-all end-all of controllers…

    I do TV/ad music for a living and workflow is everything when time is of the essence. The new NI controllers are beautiful and I so wanted to keep mine – the TRON lights are to die for, but not enough to keep me attached to mine. But the reality of it is, it slowed me down. And the fact that everything has to be wrapped in that ‘kontrol’ VST in order to work? Really? Way too much like Kore and all its problems. Meh.

  • heinrich zwahlen

    Will this 3rd party mapping only be for the vst format or also au plugins? Definitely excited about being able to save my own mappings along wiht the presets.

  • heinrich zwahlen

    Will this 3rd party mapping only be for the vst format or also au plugins? Definitely excited about being able to save my own mappings along wiht the presets.

  • heinrich zwahlen

    Will this 3rd party mapping only be for the vst format or also au plugins? Definitely excited about being able to save my own mappings along wiht the presets.

  • geoff

    No omnisphere or nexus they are the big ones for me

  • geoff

    No omnisphere or nexus they are the big ones for me

  • geoff

    No omnisphere or nexus they are the big ones for me

  • GuestGuest

    I get a kick looking at NI stuff from a VERY distant place. After the Kore debacle I’ll never send another dollar in their direction, but they do make some pretty stuff.

    • Erik Walker

      yeah, I just, against my better judgement, bought this, and the keyboard is so slow (FATAR) that I am going to return it. The idea that I might have to interact with NI customer support is so far down my list that you can’t see it.

  • GuestGuest

    I get a kick looking at NI stuff from a VERY distant place. After the Kore debacle I’ll never send another dollar in their direction, but they do make some pretty stuff.

    • Erik Walker

      yeah, I just, against my better judgement, bought this, and the keyboard is so slow (FATAR) that I am going to return it. The idea that I might have to interact with NI customer support is so far down my list that you can’t see it.

  • GuestGuest

    I get a kick looking at NI stuff from a VERY distant place. After the Kore debacle I’ll never send another dollar in their direction, but they do make some pretty stuff.

    • Erik Walker

      yeah, I just, against my better judgement, bought this, and the keyboard is so slow (FATAR) that I am going to return it. The idea that I might have to interact with NI customer support is so far down my list that you can’t see it.

  • Polite Society

    Just grab a knob to make it your own.

  • Polite Society

    Just grab a knob to make it your own.

  • Polite Society

    Just grab a knob to make it your own.

  • Prepping Brewwer

    There’s just one BAD hickup. The touch strips for PB and Mod are almost impossible to use – whoever got the original idea of “hey, let’s replace a totally working physical controller set with a mediocre touch thingies causing jigjags in your data” should be kicked in the groin area. I had three of my 61 key Komplete Kontrol keyboards replaced, and finally gave up: it just doesn’t work. And is, honestly, the worst idea in the decade, when it comes to physical controllers. No. Just… don’t.

  • Prepping Brewwer

    There’s just one BAD hickup. The touch strips for PB and Mod are almost impossible to use – whoever got the original idea of “hey, let’s replace a totally working physical controller set with a mediocre touch thingies causing jigjags in your data” should be kicked in the groin area. I had three of my 61 key Komplete Kontrol keyboards replaced, and finally gave up: it just doesn’t work. And is, honestly, the worst idea in the decade, when it comes to physical controllers. No. Just… don’t.

  • Prepping Brewwer

    There’s just one BAD hickup. The touch strips for PB and Mod are almost impossible to use – whoever got the original idea of “hey, let’s replace a totally working physical controller set with a mediocre touch thingies causing jigjags in your data” should be kicked in the groin area. I had three of my 61 key Komplete Kontrol keyboards replaced, and finally gave up: it just doesn’t work. And is, honestly, the worst idea in the decade, when it comes to physical controllers. No. Just… don’t.

  • Prepping Brewwer

    Oh, also: the coloring could be a really nice addition if the damn Kontakt would allow colored keys easily, without scripting.

    Like, SCRIPTING? For colors? Really?

  • Prepping Brewwer

    Oh, also: the coloring could be a really nice addition if the damn Kontakt would allow colored keys easily, without scripting.

    Like, SCRIPTING? For colors? Really?

  • Prepping Brewwer

    Oh, also: the coloring could be a really nice addition if the damn Kontakt would allow colored keys easily, without scripting.

    Like, SCRIPTING? For colors? Really?

  • Erik Walker

    I just bought one of these, and I find the Fatar keyboard to be, again, too heavy and sluggish. I play a Steinway grand model O, so I am not unfamiliar with pretty serious weighted action. My piano has some weight- it is pretty typical. By comparison, I find the S88 slow and heavy- particularly as you go up the keyboard, where on real pianos the action gets lighter and lighter, and you can play really fast. The S88 keyboard does not get faster enough as you go up. I play really fast, and I kind of can’t do that on the S88. I find this love affair with overly weighted ‘hammer-action’ controller keyboards/digital pianos curious, because very people even own grand pianos and this kind of heavier action on the digital controllers is a greater gram-weight than the real thing. You just can’t play fast on them. I think I will be returning the keyboard, which I really don’t want to do. I am contacting FATAR, the maker of the keys, to find out if a technician can adjust the weight. Wish me luck.

  • Erik Walker

    I just bought one of these, and I find the Fatar keyboard to be, again, too heavy and sluggish. I play a Steinway grand model O, so I am not unfamiliar with pretty serious weighted action. My piano has some weight- it is pretty typical. By comparison, I find the S88 slow and heavy- particularly as you go up the keyboard, where on real pianos the action gets lighter and lighter, and you can play really fast. The S88 keyboard does not get faster enough as you go up. I play really fast, and I kind of can’t do that on the S88. I find this love affair with overly weighted ‘hammer-action’ controller keyboards/digital pianos curious, because very people even own grand pianos and this kind of heavier action on the digital controllers is a greater gram-weight than the real thing. You just can’t play fast on them. I think I will be returning the keyboard, which I really don’t want to do. I am contacting FATAR, the maker of the keys, to find out if a technician can adjust the weight. Wish me luck.

  • Erik Walker

    I just bought one of these, and I find the Fatar keyboard to be, again, too heavy and sluggish. I play a Steinway grand model O, so I am not unfamiliar with pretty serious weighted action. My piano has some weight- it is pretty typical. By comparison, I find the S88 slow and heavy- particularly as you go up the keyboard, where on real pianos the action gets lighter and lighter, and you can play really fast. The S88 keyboard does not get faster enough as you go up. I play really fast, and I kind of can’t do that on the S88. I find this love affair with overly weighted ‘hammer-action’ controller keyboards/digital pianos curious, because very people even own grand pianos and this kind of heavier action on the digital controllers is a greater gram-weight than the real thing. You just can’t play fast on them. I think I will be returning the keyboard, which I really don’t want to do. I am contacting FATAR, the maker of the keys, to find out if a technician can adjust the weight. Wish me luck.