mother-32

Moog Music was already there for you with modular products if you wanted to live out a Keith Emerson fantasy and had thousands of dollars burning a hole in your pocket. For some, that may read like learning the Learjet company is happy to indulge your dream of flying — so long as you’ve got a few million dollars and time for pilot lessons.

Okay, so what about everyone else? Hot on the heels of the discontinuation of the Minimoog Voyager, the Mother-32 might just be Moog’s new answer to what synthesis lovers everywhere might crave. It’s a desktop (but also rack-able) semi-modular synth, and at just US$599.

The Moog Mother-32 isn’t massively expensive. It doesn’t need other modules to go with it. (This is Moog’s long-awaited entry into Eurorack, in case you were wondering – but it also stands happily on its own.) It doesn’t even insist that you connect a single patch cord: it’s a very sensible semi-modular design, with loads of patching options when you like them, but also the ability to start making sound right away.

So, if you have caught Eurorack fever, this will fit right in. But if you haven’t, it’s finally an instrument that brings back some of the appeal of semi-modular design.

mother-32-frontpanel

In fact, while it’s semi-modular, it approximates a lot of starter modular rigs. What’s onboard:

  • 10-octave analog oscillator with variable pulse width
  • Analog white noise generator
  • Voltage-controlled mixer
  • Moog Ladder Filter (low/high-pass types) – of course, it’s a Moog (accept no substitutes and whatnot)
  • 32-step sequencer, with 64 pattern recall. (Weirdly, that looks a bit Elektron-like because of the buttons!)
  • External MIDI control

You combine that with a 32-point analog patchbay.

Patchable, all the synth stuff you need, and the big surprise to me is that clever-looking step sequencer.

It also looks beautiful, with black, laser-etched extruded aluminum and (it’s a Moog!) wooden sidepieces.

Moog is also fully accessorizing this, with 2- or 3-tier rack kits and a nice soft carry case. If you do want to use this as the beginning of a slow descent into the wallet-draining, life-destroying power of Eurorack – uh, I mean the “joys of modular synthesis” – there’s a 60 HP Eurorack case – power supply not included.

mother-32-rack

Actually, if I had any kneejerk concern about this, it’s that I would look hard at what the Eurorack community can offer, since part of the appeal of modular is customizability. This is by contrast a very Moog-y offering, the vanilla stuff. If you fancy vanilla, this is, well, premium vanilla. If you fancy rum raisin, you might look at other builders. That’s keeping in mind there are plenty of oddball modules out there. And I don’t just mean the ones that are literally full of dirt – consider also very different animals like the Mutable Instruments modules. (Full disclosure: yes, I eat ice cream in the long Berlin winter. So sue me. It’s delicious. Love both those flavors. I… lost track of what I was writing about.)

There’s some worthy direct competition, too. For $899, you can pick up a Pittsburgh Modular system – and have free space to grow.

On the other hand, it’s tough to beat Moog’s $599 price – and some will find the Moog character (in aesthetics, build, and sound) a big draw. And the combination of the Moog with that full spectrum of Eurorack will also clearly appeal to a lot of people.

Updated: To better understand where this has come from, CDM asked Moog to tell us about its lineage and design. Our friend Cyril Lance, Chief Engineer, responds in detail:

The MOTHER-32 is a semi-modular analog subtractive synthesizer very much inspired by the traditional Moog modular and the instruments we’ve developed over the last 50 (15) years.

At it’s essence is a voltage-controlled, 1V/octave sawtooth analog oscillator with control-voltage summing and both linear and FM modulation inputs followed by a PWM comparator with voltage-controlled inputs. The oscillator and PWM engine is very much in the traditional of the Voyager and Little Phatty lineage.

The Noise and LFO sections are both purely analog and again are very much in the vocabulary of our synthesizers. Analog mixers, analog envelope generator, VCA, MULTS, and as you mentioned a classic Moog 4-Pole Ladder filter with a very good sounding High-Pass configuration are all in the Moog vocabulary.

The MOTHER-32 combines this powerful traditional modular sound-engine with both analog interconnectivity (including sync’ing multiple units through analog clock) and MIDI to control one or more MOTHER-32’s from external controllers / DAW’s

Additionally, a very powerful STEP SEQUENCER / One-Octave keyboard is included in the instrument, making this a fantastic tool for creativity and spontaneous composition. As you know, the sequence also heralds directly back to the original modular systems but this modern incarnation, of course, includes MIDI syncing, memory and a much more sophisticated function set.

For a sense of the sound, Moog invited synthesists Erika, Max Ravitz, and Bana Haffer to contribute video. (Erika can absolutely kill it doing techno, too, by the way, with her Ectomorph all-hardware show at Panorama Bar last month – more on that on CDM soon.)

More:
http://www.moogmusic.com/Mother-32

Also, Synthtopia had a look at Knobcon in suburban Chicago, for more detail:

  • heinrich zwahlen

    whoa, this looks like a tremendous deal!

  • heinrich zwahlen

    whoa, this looks like a tremendous deal!

  • heinrich zwahlen

    whoa, this looks like a tremendous deal!

  • Pierre Fontaine

    I can’t say I’ve been terribly interested in modular synthesis or Eurorack but at this price point, these certainly seem incredibly cool and the demos are very lovely. Thanks for the information and I look forward to a more in-depth review at some point.

    • Yeah, and it’s really *both* a standalone semi-modular – even if you don’t want to go the modular direction – and a modular addition to Eurorack if you want. Smart marketing as well as design on their part, I think.

      • …and something we’ve already seen elsewhere: Korg MS-20, MFB Dominion X and Dominion 1… Still a great idea, though. If not just because of integration with modular racks, but it also opens up a lot of other possibilities.
        I have just started connecting my Pro 2’s CV inputs with my Analog Four, so I can use the CV sequencer track to run the P2, even though the A4 does not have Midi notes out. And I can still keep the Midi connection for clock and start/stop sync.
        So, yes, that just opens up for so many more options.

        • Polite Society

          The MS-20 does not play nice with eurorack as far as I know. Different methodology, not to mention you’d need adapters for their 2.5mm jacks.

          • I don’t own an MS 20, so I can’t confirm. But my point was rather about the conceptual idea behind opening up synths to integrate via CV connections in general.

  • Pierre Fontaine

    I can’t say I’ve been terribly interested in modular synthesis or Eurorack but at this price point, these certainly seem incredibly cool and the demos are very lovely. Thanks for the information and I look forward to a more in-depth review at some point.

    • Yeah, and it’s really *both* a standalone semi-modular – even if you don’t want to go the modular direction – and a modular addition to Eurorack if you want. Smart marketing as well as design on their part, I think.

      • …and something we’ve already seen elsewhere: Korg MS-20, MFB Dominion X and Dominion 1… Still a great idea, though. If not just because of integration with modular racks, but it also opens up a lot of other possibilities.
        I have just started connecting my Pro 2’s CV inputs with my Analog Four, so I can use the CV sequencer track to run the P2, even though the A4 does not have Midi notes out. And I can still keep the Midi connection for clock and start/stop sync.
        So, yes, that just opens up for so many more options.

        • Polite Society

          The MS-20 does not play nice with eurorack as far as I know. Different methodology, not to mention you’d need adapters for their 2.5mm jacks.

          • I don’t own an MS 20, so I can’t confirm. But my point was rather about the conceptual idea behind opening up synths to integrate via CV connections in general.

  • Pierre Fontaine

    I can’t say I’ve been terribly interested in modular synthesis or Eurorack but at this price point, these certainly seem incredibly cool and the demos are very lovely. Thanks for the information and I look forward to a more in-depth review at some point.

    • Yeah, and it’s really *both* a standalone semi-modular – even if you don’t want to go the modular direction – and a modular addition to Eurorack if you want. Smart marketing as well as design on their part, I think.

      • …and something we’ve already seen elsewhere: Korg MS-20, MFB Dominion X and Dominion 1… Still a great idea, though. If not just because of integration with modular racks, but it also opens up a lot of other possibilities.
        I have just started connecting my Pro 2’s CV inputs with my Analog Four, so I can use the CV sequencer track to run the P2, even though the A4 does not have Midi notes out. And I can still keep the Midi connection for clock and start/stop sync.
        So, yes, that just opens up for so many more options.

        • Polite Society

          The MS-20 does not play nice with eurorack as far as I know. Different methodology, not to mention you’d need adapters for their 2.5mm jacks.

          • I don’t own an MS 20, so I can’t confirm. But my point was rather about the conceptual idea behind opening up synths to integrate via CV connections in general.

  • djkm

    so this is werkstatt v2?

  • djkm

    So this is the spiritual successor to the werkstatt?

  • djkm

    So this is the spiritual successor to the werkstatt?

  • FS

    man…. they just did it. unreal. i mean for the filter alone. i want it. i neeed it. 🙂

  • FS

    man…. they just did it. unreal. i mean for the filter alone. i want it. i neeed it. 🙂

  • FS

    man…. they just did it. unreal. i mean for the filter alone. i want it. i neeed it. 🙂

  • Tony Scharf

    ok…one minor bit of confusion: The moog site says its $679. I assume that is for the Mother 32 with case? Any one know if you can get it without the case and just drop it into an existing eurorack case?

    • It’s only available pre-packed with the 60HP case, AFAIK. Of course you could use that case (plus a uZeus or Row Power etc) as a satellite system to house additional modules later on – it’s got sliding M3 nut rails on it so you can put in whatever you can fit into 60HP (minus PSU module). It’s properly set up on ModularGrid now if you want to play around! There aren’t pictures of it yet but there will also be a 104HP case, too! Max Moog case module depth is 1.9″ BTW.

    • Will

      Agreed, it’s a little confusing. Particularly because the case is listed at $99 so $679 can be read as ‘synth+case+bundled discount’. I suspect that it’s just Moog selling it at “retail price” though.

      For instance, Control Voltage [link] has it listed at $599 and it appears to come with the case.

      If that’s really the, er, case, it does seems a little odd to not offer it at $500-$525 without the case.

      @peter, can you clarify?

    • $599 street is what they quoted. So that’s presumably $679 list. The case confused me, too; see Alex below…

      • Spa Ceman

        And for the Euro eurorack users it will be €710,70

  • Tony Scharf

    ok…one minor bit of confusion: The moog site says its $679. I assume that is for the Mother 32 with case? Any one know if you can get it without the case and just drop it into an existing eurorack case?

    • It’s only available pre-packed with the 60HP case, AFAIK. Of course you could use that case (plus a uZeus or Row Power etc) as a satellite system to house additional modules later on – it’s got sliding M3 nut rails on it so you can put in whatever you can fit into 60HP (minus PSU module). It’s properly set up on ModularGrid now if you want to play around! There aren’t pictures of it yet but there will also be a 104HP case, too! Max Moog case module depth is 1.9″ BTW.

    • Will

      Agreed, it’s a little confusing. Particularly because the case is listed at $99 so $679 can be read as ‘synth+case+bundled discount’. I suspect that it’s just Moog selling it at “retail price” though.

      For instance, Control Voltage [link] has it listed at $599 and it appears to come with the case.

      If that’s really the, er, case, it does seems a little odd to not offer it at $500-$525 without the case.

      @peter, can you clarify?

    • $599 street is what they quoted. So that’s presumably $679 list. The case confused me, too; see Alex below…

      • Spa Ceman

        And for the Euro eurorack users it will be €710,70

  • Tony Scharf

    ok…one minor bit of confusion: The moog site says its $679. I assume that is for the Mother 32 with case? Any one know if you can get it without the case and just drop it into an existing eurorack case?

    • It’s only available pre-packed with the 60HP case, AFAIK. Of course you could use that case (plus a uZeus or Row Power etc) as a satellite system to house additional modules later on – it’s got sliding M3 nut rails on it so you can put in whatever you can fit into 60HP (minus PSU module). It’s properly set up on ModularGrid now if you want to play around! There aren’t pictures of it yet but there will also be a 104HP case, too! Max Moog case module depth is 1.9″ BTW.

    • Will

      Agreed, it’s a little confusing. Particularly because the case is listed at $99 so $679 can be read as ‘synth+case+bundled discount’. I suspect that it’s just Moog selling it at “retail price” though.

      For instance, Control Voltage [link] has it listed at $599 and it appears to come with the case.

      If that’s really the, er, case, it does seems a little odd to not offer it at $500-$525 without the case.

      @peter, can you clarify?

    • $599 street is what they quoted. So that’s presumably $679 list. The case confused me, too; see Alex below…

      • Spa Ceman

        And for the Euro eurorack users it will be €710,70

  • mercury

    Before I clicked the video, I already started laughing because I was expecting the typical listen-to-my-fancy-fart-sound-demo, but shit, this modular actually makes non-fart music! If anything comes of this, hopefully, other modular makers will realize when they demo their products, that musical sounds are usually more appealing that fart boxes. This sounds excellent!

    • foljs

      “””hopefully, other modular makers will realize when they demo their products, that musical sounds are usually more appealing that fart boxes”””

      Createdigitalmusic loves fart sounds.

        • foljs

          Heh!

          You know it’s true though, especially if those sounds are produced by any sort of controller, especially gimmicky gloves and such.

          But whatchagonna do, I still read it for the other stuff — like this post here.

          • The sounds of this module filled with dirt… that was a bit painful. Let’s say it wasn’t my aesthetic.

            I think there’s a valid point here about demos. But a lot of engineers just aren’t great at demoing. (There are exceptions. Compare monome and Brian Crabtree – I mean, love it or not, his stuff is clearly his aesthetic, and to me it’s gorgeous. But his hardware is really on some level an outgrowth of his music.)

            Still, I think people are willing to overlook some flaws with demos from small builders that are one-person shops. Their entire revenue for the year might look like the budget for a single Moog video, in some extreme cases.

          • foljs

            Agree, though I’d take the issue with demos beyond those one-person shops builders.

            There’s two kinds of demos that grind my gears:

            1) Some companies making synths but not showcasing their electronic music potential but BS “fusion” sounds and riffs as if they catter to the Herbie Hancock/Chick Corea circa 80s demographic. I hate it when they cater to that “middle of the road US” sensitivity (as opposed to European electronica).

            2) Others that overemphasise the EDM trends of the day, showcasing endless variations of dubstep wobbly bass, tacky risers and such.

          • Robin Parmar

            The dirt module was one of my favourite things you’ve posted. Even mentioned it to my students. Whereas techno makes me yawn. Which is just to say that I am glad you serve out all types of posts for all types of listeners!

          • Absolutely … hey, it’s important to have fun!

          • Popo Bawa

            I somewhat agree about the criticism of the effectiveness of demonstration videos. But I question their usefulness in a modular context, where there is really no way to know what the module will be connected to, or what its musical application might be. This is much easier for a module/semi-module which can be demonstrated as a standalone unit.

            What I think Eurorack – and the synthesizer marketplace generally – needs more than anything is to publish more actual specifications. This provides a more general indication of whether or not a product might be of use. What are the signal levels? What is the decibel to CV relationship of the VCAs? And for standalone units, what kind of synthesis architecture does it even use? A page or so of specs would help soooo much. More often, I watch and/or hear a demo and say to myself “Sure, that sounded nice. But what IS it, exactly?”

    • Martin Wheeler

      Nothing smells quite as farty as troll fart, and of course feeding the little darlings (unsurprisingly) doesn’t help … let’s just say that if you think that the style of any manufacturer’s demo defines – or even indicates – what “this modular actually makes” then I’m sorry, but out in the real world there are people making synthpop with MakeNoise modules and others making aleatoric experimental music with Casios … or Moogs. East Coast, West Coast, Ivory Coast, bring it on … I like the sound of these demos ( despite a bit too much listen-to-my-fancy reverb) and I like most of the music, but I bet I can make them there modules fart so hard that 32 mothers wouldn’t save you …

      • foljs

        What part of what he said sounds like “trolling”?

        Because it’s a quite valid argument. If you’re OK with the style of a manufacture’s demo not indicating what sounds their product is good at, then that’s not the case for everybody.

        That there are outliers “making aleatoric experimental music with Casios” and “synthpop with MakeNoise modules” doesn’t mean that’s how you should showcase a product too.

        I’d like more comprehensive demos that do showcase a device’s capabilities (this one is excellent btw), as opposed to marketing fluff and gimmicky sounds.

        That’s also a problem with lots of YouTube/web reviews of products, they don’t give a good example of what the machine sounds like and what you stuff you can do with it.

        • Martin Wheeler

          “What part of what he said sounds like “trolling”?”
          Seriously ? To be honest, pretty much all of it :
          “I was expecting the typical listen-to-my-fancy-fart-sound-demo, but shit, this modular actually makes non-fart music!” What part of that _doesn’t_ sound like trolling to you ?
          Damn. Why is it so hard for some people to deal with the fact that people like to make different sorts of music ? And that module makers and their accomplices are going to be making different sorts of demos, including … shudder … some demos that some individuals might not take a shine to ?
          Whatever.
          If you don’t like something that’s fine.
          But if, when one comes upon a series of rather nice, fairly melodic demos of a module, ( thankfully with none of this new-fangled “farting” that them young people do) one feels obliged to start up with ye olde : “I already started laughing shit this sounds good not like your fart you fancy fart box etc etc … ”
          Well, looks like a troll, smells like a troll, and I fed it like a troll. Sorry.

          • foljs

            “””What part of that _doesn’t_ sound like trolling to you ? “””

            You keep using this word, trolling. I don’t think it means what you think it means.

            A troll is someone who says things he doesn’t believe (and aren’t true) mostly to stir up a flame thread. Heck, the guy didn’t even return to answer back for the rest of this thread.

            The guy merely laid out a VALID complaint: a lot of showcase videos have crappy sounds/pressets. If you don’t like his choice of word (“farty sounds”) that’s fine, but it’s still a quite descriptive, err, description.

            He even gave out a possitive side: this particular video is not like that, and shows the kind of sounds he thinks are fine.

            “””Damn. Why is it so hard for some people to deal with the fact that people like to make different sorts of music ?”””

            Perhaps for the same reason that’s hard for other people to understand that the mere existance of different tastes doesn’t mean those tastes shouldn’t be criticized or that individual people will stop criticizing those different sorts of music from their own viewpoint.

            There’s something that’s tangible (if elusive) about aesthetic, beyond mere taste (after all if that wasn’t true, it would make all art as trivial as one’s favorite beer or picking a color).

            Something that makes us feel that not ALL tastes and genres are equally valid.

            It might be a culture-specific thing to think that Bach or Autechre are in some way objectively better than Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus, but then again, we DO operate within a culture.

          • Martin Wheeler

            sorry, feeding time is over 😉

          • foljs

            Yeah, whatever. Are you like 20 years old? Because this is not some 4chan forum, and elaborate discussion is not “trolling”.

            In any case, I’ve laid out my arguments. You can keep hiding behind this “trolling” accusation.

          • Popo Bawa

            Another facet of “trolling” is that it can simply aim to provoke reactions from people, without necessarily being insincere. I consider this more a simple description than a “catch-all” label.

            As for validity – sure, you are of course entitled to your opinion – but it sounds like yet another more soapboxing along the tedious trope of “That’s not music, it’s noise!”

            There are people who buy contemporary instruments without the purpose of replicating melodic and harmonic structures which are hundreds of years old. Suggesting that other musical/sonic relationships are equivalent to bodily waste comes off as being glibly disingenuous.

          • foljs

            “””yet another more soapboxing along the tedious trope of “That’s not music, it’s noise!””””

            Perhaps, and isn’t that par for the course with being an artist and/or music fan? If anything was considered equally valid music by everyone, then there would be no discussion, but not much interest in art either…

          • Popo Bawa

            “isn’t that par for the course with being an artist and/or music fan?”

            No, I don’t think so. I think it gets in the way of real critique. Music seems to suffer from this more than other media. How often do you encounter somebody insisting that WorkX is not really a film, or not really a painting? Saying that a work is not even valid of the same kind of critique is straight-up dismissal. I am all for discussion about why people think that some music “works” for them more than others. But not the attempts to define objectively what is or is not music.

            “If anything was considered equally valid music by everyone, then there
            would be no discussion, but not much interest in art either…”

            This has not been my experience. Critique seems ultimately subjective, and passing off the criteria as being objective benchmarks serves to obscure their personal interpretation. People “owning” their criteria and opinions I think encourages them to be more rather than less discerning.

    • Most of those Eurorack makers are made up of a couple of people… sometimes *one person*. Moog has experienced marketing people and a network of artists.

      Give the engineers a break.

      (oh, except that modular made of dirt a few days ago, but… well, I’m sure the Moog engineers got a kick out of that, too. I don’t think that was really intended as a commercial product. And anyway, it weirdly still sold out, so I’m not sure either your or my advice matters 😉 )

      • Will

        Fart mentions aside, I totally agree that this promo is pretty much the best instrument launch promo I’ve seen in a year (ever?). The music is great, the sounds are great, the just-enough-explanation via visuals is great. I would have preferred fewer effects but they were showing end results, music, not sound demos so I get it. That my non-musician synthesizer-agnostic girlfriend enjoyed it and I was able to learn how the sounds were actually being made is really kind of a marvel.

        +1 on the network of artists making a big difference here. It’s a long-form musical demo because they have spent a lot of time building a network of artists to lean on to create the musical part of it. There are definitely great musician+makers out there but I doubt we would have heard a demo half as good were it made by the Moog engineers that created the instrument.

        And +1 to the team of pros comment. Not only do they have experienced marketing people, they have people to do all of the other stuff required to run a business (manufacturing, qa, payroll, shipping…) so that they can focus on this sorta stuff. Not really possible in a 2-10 person module making shop.

        But in additional to all of that stuff, Moog have invested a lot of time, money and creative energy over the last several years into making great looking/sounding videos of people playing their instruments (see: Sound Lab videos. Without that history, they could have hired the best marketing agency on the planet and not come up with this promo; it’s very much a product of a longer term commitment to the value of simply and artistically showing people making interesting music with Moog instruments. Kudos/congratulations to them for that.

        Peter, I’m sure your story log is overflowing but I’d love to get a CDM art+tech look into the how and why and history of the Sound Lab stuff.

  • mercury

    Before I clicked the video, I already started laughing because I was expecting the typical listen-to-my-fancy-fart-sound-demo, but shit, this modular actually makes non-fart music! If anything comes of this, hopefully, other modular makers will realize when they demo their products, that musical sounds are usually more appealing that fart boxes. This sounds excellent!

    • foljs

      “””hopefully, other modular makers will realize when they demo their products, that musical sounds are usually more appealing that fart boxes”””

      Createdigitalmusic loves fart sounds.

        • foljs

          Heh!

          You know it’s true though, especially if those sounds are produced by any sort of controller, especially gimmicky gloves and such.

          But whatchagonna do, I still read it for the other stuff — like this post here.

          • The sounds of this module filled with dirt… that was a bit painful. Let’s say it wasn’t my aesthetic.

            I think there’s a valid point here about demos. But a lot of engineers just aren’t great at demoing. (There are exceptions. Compare monome and Brian Crabtree – I mean, love it or not, his stuff is clearly his aesthetic, and to me it’s gorgeous. But his hardware is really on some level an outgrowth of his music.)

            Still, I think people are willing to overlook some flaws with demos from small builders that are one-person shops. Their entire revenue for the year might look like the budget for a single Moog video, in some extreme cases.

          • foljs

            Agree, though I’d take the issue with demos beyond those one-person shops builders.

            There’s two kinds of demos that grind my gears:

            1) Some companies making synths but not showcasing their electronic music potential but BS “fusion” sounds and riffs as if they catter to the Herbie Hancock/Chick Corea circa 80s demographic. I hate it when they cater to that “middle of the road US” sensitivity (as opposed to European electronica).

            Hah! Just chanced upon another offender in this category, the new Roland boutique synths song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1zdcqoe8qg

            2) Others that overemphasise the EDM trends of the day, showcasing endless variations of dubstep wobbly bass, tacky risers and such.

          • Robin Parmar

            The dirt module was one of my favourite things you’ve posted. Even mentioned it to my students. Whereas techno makes me yawn. Which is just to say that I am glad you serve out all types of posts for all types of listeners!

          • Absolutely … hey, it’s important to have fun!

          • Popo Bawa

            I somewhat agree about the criticism of the effectiveness of demonstration videos. But I question their usefulness in a modular context, where there is really no way to know what the module will be connected to, or what its musical application might be. This is much easier for a module/semi-module which can be demonstrated as a standalone unit.

            What I think Eurorack – and the synthesizer marketplace generally – needs more than anything is to publish more actual specifications. This provides a more general indication of whether or not a product might be of use. What are the signal levels? What is the decibel to CV relationship of the VCAs? And for standalone units, what kind of synthesis architecture does it even use? A page or so of specs would help soooo much. More often, I watch and/or hear a demo and say to myself “Sure, that sounded nice. But what IS it, exactly?”

    • Martin Wheeler

      Nothing smells quite as farty as troll fart, and of course feeding the little darlings (unsurprisingly) doesn’t help … let’s just say that if you think that the style of any manufacturer’s demo defines – or even indicates – what “this modular actually makes” then I’m sorry, but out in the real world there are people making synthpop with MakeNoise modules and others making aleatoric experimental music with Casios … or Moogs. East Coast, West Coast, Ivory Coast, bring it on … I like the sound of these demos ( despite a bit too much listen-to-my-fancy reverb) and I like most of the music, but I bet I can make them there modules fart so hard that 32 mothers wouldn’t save you …

      • foljs

        What part of what he said sounds like “trolling”?

        Because it’s a quite valid argument. If you’re OK with the style of a manufacture’s demo not indicating what sounds their product is good at, then that’s not the case for everybody.

        That there are outliers “making aleatoric experimental music with Casios” and “synthpop with MakeNoise modules” doesn’t mean that’s how you should showcase a product too.

        I’d like more comprehensive demos that do showcase a device’s capabilities (this one is excellent btw), as opposed to marketing fluff and gimmicky sounds.

        That’s also a problem with lots of YouTube/web reviews of products, they don’t give a good example of what the machine sounds like and what you stuff you can do with it.

        • Martin Wheeler

          “What part of what he said sounds like “trolling”?”
          Seriously ? To be honest, pretty much all of it :
          “I was expecting the typical listen-to-my-fancy-fart-sound-demo, but shit, this modular actually makes non-fart music!” What part of that _doesn’t_ sound like trolling to you ?
          Damn. Why is it so hard for some people to deal with the fact that people like to make different sorts of music ? And that module makers and their accomplices are going to be making different sorts of demos, including … shudder … some demos that some individuals might not take a shine to ?
          Whatever.
          If you don’t like something that’s fine.
          But if, when one comes upon a series of rather nice, fairly melodic demos of a module, ( thankfully with none of this new-fangled “farting” that them young people do) one feels obliged to start up with ye olde : “I already started laughing shit this sounds good not like your fart you fancy fart box etc etc … ”
          Well, looks like a troll, smells like a troll, and I fed it like a troll. Sorry.

          • foljs

            “””What part of that _doesn’t_ sound like trolling to you ? “””

            You keep using this word, trolling. I don’t think it means what you think it means.

            A troll is someone who says things he doesn’t believe (and aren’t true) mostly to stir up a flame thread. Heck, the guy didn’t even return to answer back for the rest of this thread.

            The guy merely laid out a valid complaint, even if you don’t agree with it: a lot of showcase videos have crappy sounds/pressets. If you don’t like his choice of word (“farty sounds”) that’s fine, but it’s still a quite descriptive, err, description.

            He even gave out a possitive side: this particular video is not like that, and shows the kind of sounds he thinks are fine.

            I think you conflate troll with “person expressing a complaint”.

            IIRC, Peter (the host of this blog) has also expressed his frustration with crappy presets in synth demos in a past post.

            “””Damn. Why is it so hard for some people to deal with the fact that people like to make different sorts of music ?”””

            Perhaps for the same reason that’s hard for other people to understand that the mere existance of different tastes doesn’t mean those tastes shouldn’t be criticized or that individual people will stop criticizing those different sorts of music from their own viewpoint.

            There’s something that feels tangible (if elusive) about aesthetics, beyond mere taste (after all if that wasn’t true, it would make all art as trivial as one’s favorite beer or picking a color). Something that makes us feel that not ALL tastes and genres are equally valid.

            It might be a culture-specific thing to think that Bach or Autechre are in some way objectively better than Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus, but then again, we DO operate within a culture.

          • Martin Wheeler

            sorry, feeding time is over 😉

          • foljs

            If you go out in life labelling anyone you disagree with as a “troll” you’ll miss out on a lot of interesting perspectives. In any case, I’ve laid out my arguments. You could either refute them, agree with me, or say that we’ll have to agree to disagree — instead of hiding behind this catch-all “trolling” accusation.

            PS. What’s funny is I did a search to see whether you’re one of the “farty noodling” types (and hence the offense taken for the OPs comment), and I can say I dig your tracks.

            Stuff like “Floating Point” etc…

          • Popo Bawa

            Another facet of “trolling” is that it can simply aim to provoke reactions from people, without necessarily being insincere. I consider this more a simple description than a “catch-all” label.

            As for validity – sure, you are of course entitled to your opinion – but it sounds like yet another more soapboxing along the tedious trope of “That’s not music, it’s noise!”

            There are people who buy contemporary instruments without the purpose of replicating melodic and harmonic structures which are hundreds of years old. Suggesting that other musical/sonic relationships are equivalent to bodily waste comes off as being glibly disingenuous.

          • foljs

            “””yet another more soapboxing along the tedious trope of “That’s not music, it’s noise!””””

            Perhaps, and isn’t that par for the course with being an artist and/or music fan? If anything was considered equally valid music by everyone, then there would be no discussion, but not much interest in art either…

          • Popo Bawa

            “isn’t that par for the course with being an artist and/or music fan?”

            No, I don’t think so. I think it gets in the way of real critique. Music seems to suffer from this more than other media. How often do you encounter somebody insisting that WorkX is not really a film, or not really a painting? Saying that a work is not even valid of the same kind of critique is straight-up dismissal. I am all for discussion about why people think that some music “works” for them more than others. But not the attempts to define objectively what is or is not music.

            “If anything was considered equally valid music by everyone, then there
            would be no discussion, but not much interest in art either…”

            This has not been my experience. Critique seems ultimately subjective, and passing off the criteria as being objective benchmarks serves to obscure their personal interpretation. People “owning” their criteria and opinions I think encourages them to be more rather than less discerning.

    • Most of those Eurorack makers are made up of a couple of people… sometimes *one person*. Moog has experienced marketing people and a network of artists.

      Give the engineers a break.

      (oh, except that modular made of dirt a few days ago, but… well, I’m sure the Moog engineers got a kick out of that, too. I don’t think that was really intended as a commercial product. And anyway, it weirdly still sold out, so I’m not sure either your or my advice matters 😉 )

      • Will

        Fart mentions aside, I totally agree that this promo is pretty much the best instrument launch promo I’ve seen in a year (ever?). The music is great, the sounds are great, the just-enough-explanation via visuals is great. I would have preferred fewer effects but they were showing end results, music, not sound demos so I get it. That my non-musician synthesizer-agnostic girlfriend enjoyed it and I was able to learn how the sounds were actually being made is really kind of a marvel.

        +1 on the network of artists making a big difference here. It’s a long-form musical demo because they have spent a lot of time building a network of artists to lean on to create the musical part of it. There are definitely great musician+makers out there but I doubt we would have heard a demo half as good were it made by the Moog engineers that created the instrument.

        And +1 to the team of pros comment. Not only do they have experienced marketing people, they have people to do all of the other stuff required to run a business (manufacturing, qa, payroll, shipping…) so that they can focus on this sorta stuff. Not really possible in a 2-10 person module making shop.

        But in additional to all of that stuff, Moog have invested a lot of time, money and creative energy over the last several years into making great looking/sounding videos of people playing their instruments (see: Sound Lab videos. Without that history, they could have hired the best marketing agency on the planet and not come up with this promo; it’s very much a product of a longer term commitment to the value of simply and artistically showing people making interesting music with Moog instruments. Kudos/congratulations to them for that.

        Peter, I’m sure your story log is overflowing but I’d love to get a CDM art+tech look into the how and why and history of the Sound Lab stuff.

  • mercury

    Before I clicked the video, I already started laughing because I was expecting the typical listen-to-my-fancy-fart-sound-demo, but shit, this modular actually makes non-fart music! If anything comes of this, hopefully, other modular makers will realize when they demo their products, that musical sounds are usually more appealing that fart boxes. This sounds excellent!

    • foljs

      “””hopefully, other modular makers will realize when they demo their products, that musical sounds are usually more appealing that fart boxes”””

      Createdigitalmusic loves fart sounds.

        • foljs

          Heh!

          You know it’s true though, especially if those sounds are produced by any sort of controller, especially gimmicky gloves and such.

          But whatchagonna do, I still read it for the other stuff — like this post here.

          • The sounds of this module filled with dirt… that was a bit painful. Let’s say it wasn’t my aesthetic.

            I think there’s a valid point here about demos. But a lot of engineers just aren’t great at demoing. (There are exceptions. Compare monome and Brian Crabtree – I mean, love it or not, his stuff is clearly his aesthetic, and to me it’s gorgeous. But his hardware is really on some level an outgrowth of his music.)

            Still, I think people are willing to overlook some flaws with demos from small builders that are one-person shops. Their entire revenue for the year might look like the budget for a single Moog video, in some extreme cases.

          • foljs

            Agree, though I’d take the issue with demos beyond those one-person shops builders.

            There’s two kinds of demos that grind my gears:

            1) Some companies making synths but not showcasing their electronic music potential but BS “fusion” sounds and riffs as if they catter to the Herbie Hancock/Chick Corea circa 80s demographic. I hate it when they cater to that “middle of the road US” sensitivity (as opposed to European electronica).

            Hah! Just chanced upon another offender in this category, the new Roland boutique synths song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1zdcqoe8qg

            2) Others that overemphasise the EDM trends of the day, showcasing endless variations of dubstep wobbly bass, tacky risers and such.

          • The dirt module was one of my favourite things you’ve posted. Even mentioned it to my students. Whereas techno makes me yawn. Which is just to say that I am glad you serve out all types of posts for all types of listeners!

          • Absolutely … hey, it’s important to have fun!

          • Popo Bawa

            I somewhat agree about the criticism of the effectiveness of demonstration videos. But I question their usefulness in a modular context, where there is really no way to know what the module will be connected to, or what its musical application might be. This is much easier for a module/semi-module which can be demonstrated as a standalone unit.

            What I think Eurorack – and the synthesizer marketplace generally – needs more than anything is to publish more actual specifications. This provides a more general indication of whether or not a product might be of use. What are the signal levels? What is the decibel to CV relationship of the VCAs? And for standalone units, what kind of synthesis architecture does it even use? A page or so of specs would help soooo much. More often, I watch and/or hear a demo and say to myself “Sure, that sounded nice. But what IS it, exactly?”

    • Martin Wheeler

      Nothing smells quite as farty as troll fart, and of course feeding the little darlings (unsurprisingly) doesn’t help … let’s just say that if you think that the style of any manufacturer’s demo defines – or even indicates – what “this modular actually makes” then I’m sorry, but out in the real world there are people making synthpop with MakeNoise modules and others making aleatoric experimental music with Casios … or Moogs. East Coast, West Coast, Ivory Coast, bring it on … I like the sound of these demos ( despite a bit too much listen-to-my-fancy reverb) and I like most of the music, but I bet I can make them there modules fart so hard that 32 mothers wouldn’t save you …

      • foljs

        What part of what he said sounds like “trolling”?

        Because it’s a quite valid argument. If you’re OK with the style of a manufacture’s demo not indicating what sounds their product is good at, then that’s not the case for everybody.

        That there are outliers “making aleatoric experimental music with Casios” and “synthpop with MakeNoise modules” doesn’t mean that’s how you should showcase a product too.

        I’d like more comprehensive demos that do showcase a device’s capabilities (this one is excellent btw), as opposed to marketing fluff and gimmicky sounds.

        That’s also a problem with lots of YouTube/web reviews of products, they don’t give a good example of what the machine sounds like and what you stuff you can do with it.

        • Martin Wheeler

          “What part of what he said sounds like “trolling”?”
          Seriously ? To be honest, pretty much all of it :
          “I was expecting the typical listen-to-my-fancy-fart-sound-demo, but shit, this modular actually makes non-fart music!” What part of that _doesn’t_ sound like trolling to you ?
          Damn. Why is it so hard for some people to deal with the fact that people like to make different sorts of music ? And that module makers and their accomplices are going to be making different sorts of demos, including … shudder … some demos that some individuals might not take a shine to ?
          Whatever.
          If you don’t like something that’s fine.
          But if, when one comes upon a series of rather nice, fairly melodic demos of a module, ( thankfully with none of this new-fangled “farting” that them young people do) one feels obliged to start up with ye olde : “I already started laughing shit this sounds good not like your fart you fancy fart box etc etc … ”
          Well, looks like a troll, smells like a troll, and I fed it like a troll. Sorry.

          • foljs

            “””What part of that _doesn’t_ sound like trolling to you ? “””

            You keep using this word, trolling. I don’t think it means what you think it means.

            A troll is someone who says things he doesn’t believe (and aren’t true) mostly to stir up a flame thread. Heck, the guy didn’t even return to answer back for the rest of this thread.

            The guy merely laid out a valid complaint, even if you don’t agree with it: a lot of showcase videos have crappy sounds/pressets. If you don’t like his choice of word (“farty sounds”) that’s fine, but it’s still a quite descriptive, err, description.

            He even gave out a possitive side: this particular video is not like that, and shows the kind of sounds he thinks are fine.

            I think you conflate troll with “person expressing a complaint”.

            IIRC, Peter (the host of this blog) has also expressed his frustration with crappy presets in synth demos in a past post.

            “””Damn. Why is it so hard for some people to deal with the fact that people like to make different sorts of music ?”””

            Perhaps for the same reason that’s hard for other people to understand that the mere existance of different tastes doesn’t mean those tastes shouldn’t be criticized or that individual people will stop criticizing those different sorts of music from their own viewpoint.

            There’s something that feels tangible (if elusive) about aesthetics, beyond mere taste (after all if that wasn’t true, it would make all art as trivial as one’s favorite beer or picking a color). Something that makes us feel that not ALL tastes and genres are equally valid.

            It might be a culture-specific thing to think that Bach or Autechre are in some way objectively better than Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus, but then again, we DO operate within a culture.

          • Martin Wheeler

            sorry, feeding time is over 😉

          • foljs

            If you go out in life labelling anyone you disagree with as a “troll” you’ll miss out on a lot of interesting perspectives. In any case, I’ve laid out my arguments. You could either refute them, agree with me, or say that we’ll have to agree to disagree — instead of hiding behind this catch-all “trolling” accusation.

            PS. What’s funny is I did a search to see whether you’re one of the “farty noodling” types (and hence the offense taken for the OPs comment), and I can say I dig your tracks.

            Stuff like “Floating Point” etc…

          • Popo Bawa

            Another facet of “trolling” is that it can simply aim to provoke reactions from people, without necessarily being insincere. I consider this more a simple description than a “catch-all” label.

            As for validity – sure, you are of course entitled to your opinion – but it sounds like yet another more soapboxing along the tedious trope of “That’s not music, it’s noise!”

            There are people who buy contemporary instruments without the purpose of replicating melodic and harmonic structures which are hundreds of years old. Suggesting that other musical/sonic relationships are equivalent to bodily waste comes off as being glibly disingenuous.

          • foljs

            “””yet another more soapboxing along the tedious trope of “That’s not music, it’s noise!””””

            Perhaps, and isn’t that par for the course with being an artist and/or music fan? If anything was considered equally valid music by everyone, then there would be no discussion, but not much interest in art either…

          • Popo Bawa

            “isn’t that par for the course with being an artist and/or music fan?”

            No, I don’t think so. I think it gets in the way of real critique. Music seems to suffer from this more than other media. How often do you encounter somebody insisting that WorkX is not really a film, or not really a painting? Saying that a work is not even valid of the same kind of critique is straight-up dismissal. I am all for discussion about why people think that some music “works” for them more than others. But not the attempts to define objectively what is or is not music.

            “If anything was considered equally valid music by everyone, then there
            would be no discussion, but not much interest in art either…”

            This has not been my experience. Critique seems ultimately subjective, and passing off the criteria as being objective benchmarks serves to obscure their personal interpretation. People “owning” their criteria and opinions I think encourages them to be more rather than less discerning.

    • Most of those Eurorack makers are made up of a couple of people… sometimes *one person*. Moog has experienced marketing people and a network of artists.

      Give the engineers a break.

      (oh, except that modular made of dirt a few days ago, but… well, I’m sure the Moog engineers got a kick out of that, too. I don’t think that was really intended as a commercial product. And anyway, it weirdly still sold out, so I’m not sure either your or my advice matters 😉 )

      • Will

        Fart mentions aside, I totally agree that this promo is pretty much the best instrument launch promo I’ve seen in a year (ever?). The music is great, the sounds are great, the just-enough-explanation via visuals is great. I would have preferred fewer effects but they were showing end results, music, not sound demos so I get it. That my non-musician synthesizer-agnostic girlfriend enjoyed it and I was able to learn how the sounds were actually being made is really kind of a marvel.

        +1 on the network of artists making a big difference here. It’s a long-form musical demo because they have spent a lot of time building a network of artists to lean on to create the musical part of it. There are definitely great musician+makers out there but I doubt we would have heard a demo half as good were it made by the Moog engineers that created the instrument.

        And +1 to the team of pros comment. Not only do they have experienced marketing people, they have people to do all of the other stuff required to run a business (manufacturing, qa, payroll, shipping…) so that they can focus on this sorta stuff. Not really possible in a 2-10 person module making shop.

        But in additional to all of that stuff, Moog have invested a lot of time, money and creative energy over the last several years into making great looking/sounding videos of people playing their instruments (see: Sound Lab videos. Without that history, they could have hired the best marketing agency on the planet and not come up with this promo; it’s very much a product of a longer term commitment to the value of simply and artistically showing people making interesting music with Moog instruments. Kudos/congratulations to them for that.

        Peter, I’m sure your story log is overflowing but I’d love to get a CDM art+tech look into the how and why and history of the Sound Lab stuff.

  • Will

    That’s a hell of a lot more synth than I thought it was going to be. Plus a sequencer?

    It might be vanilla as compared to the world of modules available today but module makers and retailers should be partying today: this is going to be a serious gateway drug for a lot of future customers.

    • Oh, no question — I think either way, small builders should welcome this entry to the market. Even looking at something like the Pittsburgh Modular entry that might be the direct competitor, they’re put together differently; each has selling points.

      I meant only that now that you do have some choice, you can go a very different direction from this …

  • Will

    That’s a hell of a lot more synth than I thought it was going to be. Plus a sequencer?

    It might be vanilla as compared to the world of modules available today but module makers and retailers should be partying today: this is going to be a serious gateway drug for a lot of future customers.

    • Oh, no question — I think either way, small builders should welcome this entry to the market. Even looking at something like the Pittsburgh Modular entry that might be the direct competitor, they’re put together differently; each has selling points.

      I meant only that now that you do have some choice, you can go a very different direction from this …

  • Will

    That’s a hell of a lot more synth than I thought it was going to be. Plus a sequencer?

    It might be vanilla as compared to the world of modules available today but module makers and retailers should be partying today: this is going to be a serious gateway drug for a lot of future customers.

    • Oh, no question — I think either way, small builders should welcome this entry to the market. Even looking at something like the Pittsburgh Modular entry that might be the direct competitor, they’re put together differently; each has selling points.

      I meant only that now that you do have some choice, you can go a very different direction from this …

  • Will

    Hmm, with a bit of creativity to extend their width, the also freshly dropped JP08 and fam would fit into the Moog two and three tier cases.

    • Pat Pending

      Was thinking the exact same thing.

  • Will

    Hmm, with a bit of creativity to extend their width, the also freshly dropped JP08 and fam would fit into the Moog two and three tier cases.

    • Pat Pending

      Was thinking the exact same thing.

  • Will

    Hmm, with a bit of creativity to extend their width, the also freshly dropped JP08 and fam would fit into the Moog two and three tier cases.

    • Pat Pending

      Was thinking the exact same thing.

  • “The oscillator and PWM engine is very much in the traditional of the Voyager and Little Phatty lineage”
    So, that’s why both synth lines have been discontinued recently? Because they need the parts for their new product?

    • Ha – uh, expect that’s not why. Well, I still want to see if they come up with a replacement for the Voyager. Both products were clearly ready for a new generation, but the Voyager is the one that seems not to have a successor yet.

    • Probably because all the people who wanted a Voyager or Lil’ Phatty have bought one, but more likely to reduce the workload on their production staff.

      • Nagasaki Nightrider

        Maybe so in the case of the Lil’ Phatty, but I can guarantee you that everyone who wants a Voyager has not bought one. Not even close. I also have a hard time imagining that Moog’s small staff will be taking much of a breather anytime soon whatever they release next.

        • Well if they are stopping production of Voyagers and starting on Mother32s then it ought to be a zero sum game for their production team.

          I know what you mean about the Voyager, but i never felt that attracted to that synth. The DSI Polyevolver however…that I am upset that there arent any new ones.

          Product refreshes are always good, keeps things moving and new ideas coming out.

  • “The oscillator and PWM engine is very much in the traditional of the Voyager and Little Phatty lineage”
    So, that’s why both synth lines have been discontinued recently? Because they need the parts for their new product?

    • Ha – uh, expect that’s not why. Well, I still want to see if they come up with a replacement for the Voyager. Both products were clearly ready for a new generation, but the Voyager is the one that seems not to have a successor yet.

    • Probably because all the people who wanted a Voyager or Lil’ Phatty have bought one, but more likely to reduce the workload on their production staff.

      • Nagasaki Nightrider

        Maybe so in the case of the Lil’ Phatty, but I can guarantee you that everyone who wants a Voyager has not bought one. Not even close. I also have a hard time imagining that Moog’s small staff will be taking much of a breather anytime soon whatever they release next.

        • Well if they are stopping production of Voyagers and starting on Mother32s then it ought to be a zero sum game for their production team.

          I know what you mean about the Voyager, but i never felt that attracted to that synth. The DSI Polyevolver however…that I am upset that there arent any new ones.

          Product refreshes are always good, keeps things moving and new ideas coming out.

  • “The oscillator and PWM engine is very much in the traditional of the Voyager and Little Phatty lineage”
    So, that’s why both synth lines have been discontinued recently? Because they need the parts for their new product?

    • Ha – uh, expect that’s not why. Well, I still want to see if they come up with a replacement for the Voyager. Both products were clearly ready for a new generation, but the Voyager is the one that seems not to have a successor yet.

    • Probably because all the people who wanted a Voyager or Lil’ Phatty have bought one, but more likely to reduce the workload on their production staff.

      • Nagasaki Nightrider

        Maybe so in the case of the Lil’ Phatty, but I can guarantee you that everyone who wants a Voyager has not bought one. Not even close. I also have a hard time imagining that Moog’s small staff will be taking much of a breather anytime soon whatever they release next.

        • Well if they are stopping production of Voyagers and starting on Mother32s then it ought to be a zero sum game for their production team.

          I know what you mean about the Voyager, but i never felt that attracted to that synth. The DSI Polyevolver however…that I am upset that there arent any new ones.

          Product refreshes are always good, keeps things moving and new ideas coming out.

  • Oh, and here is about a ton of audio examples:
    https://soundcloud.com/moogmusicinc/sets/mother-32-sound-samples

  • Oh, and here is about a ton of audio examples:
    https://soundcloud.com/moogmusicinc/sets/mother-32-sound-samples

  • Oh, and here is about a ton of audio examples:
    https://soundcloud.com/moogmusicinc/sets/mother-32-sound-samples

  • Antonio Leon

    That ice cream mini rant killed me.
    Nice one Peter

  • Antonio Leon

    That ice cream mini rant killed me.
    Nice one Peter

  • David Ashton

    This looks/sounds like a great synth in its own right but… Is it just me or does it really feel like Moog are only entering the eurorack world reluctantly/grudgingly? Like with their full-size modular (only available as complete systems) it really feels like they’d prefer you to use Moog gear on their terms, without other gear, even if they’ve made it possible to cross-patch it with eurorack.

    People have been asking for eurorack equivalents of the Moogerfoogers for years, but instead we get… a stand alone synth. The Mother32 doesn’t work with the standard eurorack power rails, so it (arguably) doesn’t even qualify as a eurorack module. It comes in it’s own case with no room for other modules. You can buy an empty Mother32 case, but it has a closed back with holes where the Mother32 connections go; in other words they’ve made it hard to add eurorack power. Compare this to Roland who include a eurorack power adaptor with their modular gear, and show it being integrated with other manufacturers’ gear in their demos.

    • FS

      this is Eurorack, it goes in any Eurorack case 60hp or larger. i think this is incredibly well thought through. it is an extremely well priced entry into Eurorack and Moog both at the same time. if i wanted to buy noise, osc, lfo, filter, attenuators and a sequencer all as separate Eurorack modules it might be impossible for under $600. this thing is a huge win no matter how you look at it and i applaud Moog for taking the time to think this through and release something awesome on so many levels.

  • David Ashton

    This looks/sounds like a great synth in its own right but… Is it just me or does it really feel like Moog are only entering the eurorack world reluctantly/grudgingly? Like with their full-size modular (only available as complete systems) it really feels like they’d prefer you to use Moog gear on their terms, without other gear, even if they’ve made it possible to cross-patch it with eurorack.

    People have been asking for eurorack equivalents of the Moogerfoogers for years, but instead we get… a stand alone synth. The Mother32 doesn’t work with the standard eurorack power rails, so it (arguably) doesn’t even qualify as a eurorack module. It comes in it’s own case with no room for other modules. You can buy an empty Mother32 case, but it has a closed back with holes where the Mother32 connections go; in other words they’ve made it hard to add eurorack power. Compare this to Roland who include a eurorack power adaptor with their modular gear, and show it being integrated with other manufacturers’ gear in their demos.

    • FS

      this is Eurorack, it goes in any Eurorack case 60hp or larger. i think this is incredibly well thought through. it is an extremely well priced entry into Eurorack and Moog both at the same time. if i wanted to buy noise, osc, lfo, filter, attenuators and a sequencer all as separate Eurorack modules it might be impossible for under $600. this thing is a huge win no matter how you look at it and i applaud Moog for taking the time to think this through and release something awesome on so many levels.

  • David Ashton

    This looks/sounds like a great synth in its own right but… Is it just me or does it really feel like Moog are only entering the eurorack world reluctantly/grudgingly? Like with their full-size modular (only available as complete systems) it really feels like they’d prefer you to use Moog gear on their terms, without other gear, even if they’ve made it possible to cross-patch it with eurorack.

    People have been asking for eurorack equivalents of the Moogerfoogers for years, but instead we get… a stand alone synth. The Mother32 doesn’t work with the standard eurorack power rails, so it (arguably) doesn’t even qualify as a eurorack module. It comes in it’s own case with no room for other modules. You can buy an empty Mother32 case, but it has a closed back with holes where the Mother32 connections go; in other words they’ve made it hard to add eurorack power. Compare this to Roland who include a eurorack power adaptor with their modular gear, and show it being integrated with other manufacturers’ gear in their demos.

    • FS

      this is Eurorack, it goes in any Eurorack case 60hp or larger. i think this is incredibly well thought through. it is an extremely well priced entry into Eurorack and Moog both at the same time. if i wanted to buy noise, osc, lfo, filter, attenuators and a sequencer all as separate Eurorack modules it might be impossible for under $600. this thing is a huge win no matter how you look at it and i applaud Moog for taking the time to think this through and release something awesome on so many levels.

  • Polite Society

    Even as someone who already has a start in modular, getting a moog filter, vco, noise, lfo, amp, envelope, midi to cv and sequencer for that price is a frikking steal. I’m in.

  • Polite Society

    Even as someone who already has a start in modular, getting a moog filter, vco, noise, lfo, amp, envelope, midi to cv and sequencer for that price is a frikking steal. I’m in.

  • Polite Society

    Even as someone who already has a start in modular, getting a moog filter, vco, noise, lfo, amp, envelope, midi to cv and sequencer for that price is a frikking steal. I’m in.

  • fluffy

    not a bad price for an eurostarter pack…and like it or not, it´s a moogy!
    comparing it´s price with a single boutique vco or vcf…i think the moogy wins if you want an all in one mini-euro combo.

  • fluffy

    not a bad price for an eurostarter pack…and like it or not, it´s a moogy!
    comparing it´s price with a single boutique vco or vcf…i think the moogy wins if you want an all in one mini-euro combo.

  • fluffy

    not a bad price for an eurostarter pack…and like it or not, it´s a moogy!
    comparing it´s price with a single boutique vco or vcf…i think the moogy wins if you want an all in one mini-euro combo.

  • Robin Parmar

    If the case is hit by a kobold, does it now have 58 HP?

  • Robin Parmar

    If the case is hit by a kobold, does it now have 58 HP?

  • If the case is hit by a kobold, does it now have 58 HP?

  • FS

    does anyone else feel like they are hearing reverb throughout the official presentation video?? or is it just use of longer decays and / or release times?

  • FS

    does anyone else feel like they are hearing reverb throughout the official presentation video?? or is it just use of longer decays and / or release times?

  • FS

    does anyone else feel like they are hearing reverb throughout the official presentation video?? or is it just use of longer decays and / or release times?

  • Matt Leaf

    looks amazing. I’m one of those those dudes that always been a bit wary of modular. this might be a nice gentle way in

  • Matt Leaf

    looks amazing. I’m one of those those dudes that always been a bit wary of modular. this might be a nice gentle way in

  • Matt Leaf

    looks amazing. I’m one of those those dudes that always been a bit wary of modular. this might be a nice gentle way in

  • Peter Wilson

    Thing is, this thing _sounds_ fantastic! What it lacks in flexibility it makes up for in sheer ladder-filter goodness.
    For some reason I like its sound _better_ than any of the Fattys – what’d they do different??
    One last thing: How much would you pay for a 32 step seq module with 64 pattern memory – _alone_?