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The new Push hardware may have been the big, new shiny from Ableton this week. But for Live users, the software changes in 9.5 may have the greatest impact on day-to-day music-making life.

Live 9.5 has arrived as a free upgrade for Live 9 users. The biggest change is the new Simpler, but some other additions and changes are significant, too. Here’s a look at what’s new and how to take advantage of some of 9.5’s less-obvious capabilities.

First, you’ll notice that Tracks are colored by default, and Clips automatically take their Track color. That’s good news for anyone getting lost in sets or wasting time obsessing about what color things should be.

Then, the big new feature is SImpler. You’ll see Ableton talk a lot about Simpler and Push in the same breath, with good reason. The hardware/software combination of 9.5 and Push 2 make working with samples in Live more like working with a dedicated drum machine – and less like working with a laptop.

But whether or not you’ve getting the new Push (or the original, for that matter), the new Simpler could change the way you work with samples in Live. There are three modes, each now tied to Live’s familiar Warp algorithms:

  • Classic mode. Closest to the original Simpler, but now with options for pitch and time stretching.
  • 1-shot mode. Useful with longer samples. Either set to “trigger” to let each 1-shot play in its entirety, or “gate” to restrict to note length.
  • Slice mode. Can I get a hallelujah? Now, you can cut up sounds right in Simpler, without any additional steps, just by dragging and dropping. Adjust sensitivity for more or fewer slices. That’s in stark contrast to the clunky features in past versions.

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Users of other drum machines may roll their eyes at some of this, as it’s obviously familiar, but it’s a pretty big deal to have it integrated in Live. Live doesn’t count as the first DAW to do this, either, but on the other hand, Live pioneered Session View, and it’s unquestionably a different workflow.

I loved the old Simpler, and so love this new Simpler even more – and didn’t look back for a second. Talking to readers, though, not everyone feels that way. It seems some of you do actually want to hot-swap samples without changing in and out points, which I wouldn’t have expected. For now, the way to do that is right-click the sample and choose manage sample, then drag from the browser to the tab. If you drag and drop files directly, you’ll reset those parameters.

You don’t get these same Warp Modes or slicing in Sampler, the multi-sampled Live instrument. But with Simpler capable of so much, I’m willing to wait a while longer for that addition.

Here’s another cool feature you asked about: glide. You can now select “glide” mode and change pitch without re-triggering sounds. (This also works with 1-shots – you can change transposition as a long file plays back, which can produce some creative results.)

CDM’s David Abravanel walks us through that in a video:

Simpler also adds new filters, with models of classics like the Korg MS20 and Moog Prodigy. They’re the result of a collaboration with Cytomic’s Andy Simper, the mind behind the Glue Compressor. And they’re also available in Sampler, Operator, and Auto Filter. For an added twist, there’s a “morph” mode for sweeping through filter shapes, in both Operator and Auto Filter.

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Simpler is the only internal device, but there are three new Max for Live Synths (Multi, Poli, and Bass), and one new Max for Live Arpeggiator (Arp). They’re included in the new Max Essentials Pack.

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Of these, Multi is our favorite. You get six synthesis modes, from additive to feedback FM to karplus-strong physical modeling. Each has four parameters and an easy randomization switch. That means quick inspiration is always at hand, but you can also dive deeper to finesse sounds.

Here’s David showing you how to get the most out of Multi:

It’s a fantastic instrument, with some really counter-intuitive knob labels. For instance, “Split” adjusts between a simultaneous chord and an arpeggiator – not keyboard split in the traditional sense. And “Wet/Dry” even more confusingly means the number of scale degrees added above the root, not effect level or something similar. But once you get the hang of this, it’s loads of fun – and David notes the similarity to Teenage Engineering’s OP-1 (which also seems to have inspired the displays on the Push 2).

Instant Haus has been updated, too. A new breakbeats-style sequencing mode makes for some good times, which we cover separately:
Watch this: Instant Haus + Simpler in Live 9.5 = crazy breaks

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Finally, don’t forget RMS metering. It’s maybe the smallest change in Live 9.5, but it could be the one with the biggest impact on the quality of mixes. The additional light green indicator gives a better picture of average loudness of a track.

I’ve been frankly puzzled by producers complaining about the “mix engine” in Live – even after Ableton made a native 64-bit mix engine and did lab comparisons with other DAWs. My strong suspicion is that people are simply failing to leave enough headroom in their mix, and that’s what they’re hearing in the sound. One easy way to fall in that trap is to try to watch peak meters as an indication of how loud tracks are, which can fail to give a good picture of what’s really going on in the mix. RMS metering was invented for a reason; there’s no substitute for using your ears, but visuals help.

These aren’t the only changes in 9.5. There are also loads of new sounds, many taking advantage of the new Simpler. And while it’s not in the present build, Link wireless sync is coming, which is actually my personal Favorite New Thing in general (and which is relevant to iOS apps immediately, not just Ableton Live). Stay tuned for those.

Now, has Ableton added everything on my wish list, or yours, or anyone else’s? Hardly. For one thing, a UI architecture that debuted before OS X is now starting to look more than a little long in the tooth, and that can slow down editing when you are on-screen (nice as it is to gaze away from the screen with Push). But as a free interim update, Live 9.5 represents a whole lot of work. Combined with the revelatory jamming powers of Link, it shows Ableton have been busy on more than just new hardware. And far from a feature leap-frog, I know these are tools I’ll use in music making right away.

Let us know what you think, and if you have any questions or tips of your own.

David Abravanel contributed to this story.

  • jipumarino

    Being a heavy u-he plugins user, for me the best new feature is better plugin integration, which comes in the form of:
    1. Being able to define a plugin config as default (including its mapped parameters)
    2. Being able to browse plugins directly from Push
    3. Being able to browse plugin presets from Push (AU only)

    I previously had a script which batch converted all u-he’s presets to Live racks (.adg files), which could be browsed and hot-swapped with Push. Now a similar script converts the presets from their proprietary format into .aupreset standard files.

    It all seems to indicate that we will soon get user-definable parameter banks for plugins without resorting to (admittedly awesome) hacks like ubermap.

    • Mt Indigo

      “It all seems to indicate that we will soon get user-definable parameter banks for plugins… ”

      Really hope so. I’m holding off until then. Really nervous about buying another “aaalmost there” piece of music gear. Wish Ableton would state that’s on the roadmap, kind of like how Elektron has done with OverBridge develoment phases.

      • jipumarino

        Agree. I already own Push and the new one is appealing for my usage even in the current state, so I’m happy just with the current set of changes.

  • jipumarino

    Being a heavy u-he plugins user, for me the best new feature is better plugin integration, which comes in the form of:
    1. Being able to define a plugin config as default (including its mapped parameters)
    2. Being able to browse plugins directly from Push
    3. Being able to browse plugin presets from Push (AU only)

    I previously had a script which batch converted all u-he’s presets to Live racks (.adg files), which could be browsed and hot-swapped with Push. Now a similar script converts the presets from their proprietary format into .aupreset standard files.

    It all seems to indicate that we will soon get user-definable parameter banks for plugins without resorting to (admittedly awesome) hacks like ubermap.

    • Mt Indigo

      “It all seems to indicate that we will soon get user-definable parameter banks for plugins… ”

      Really hope so. I’m holding off until then. Really nervous about buying another “aaalmost there” piece of music gear. Wish Ableton would state that’s on the roadmap, kind of like how Elektron has done with OverBridge develoment phases.

      • jipumarino

        Agree. I already own Push and the new one is appealing for my usage even in the current state, so I’m happy just with the current set of changes.

  • jipumarino

    Being a heavy u-he plugins user, for me the best new feature is better plugin integration, which comes in the form of:
    1. Being able to define a plugin config as default (including its mapped parameters)
    2. Being able to browse plugins directly from Push
    3. Being able to browse plugin presets from Push (AU only)

    I previously had a script which batch converted all u-he’s presets to Live racks (.adg files), which could be browsed and hot-swapped with Push. Now a similar script converts the presets from their proprietary format into .aupreset standard files.

    It all seems to indicate that we will soon get user-definable parameter banks for plugins without resorting to (admittedly awesome) hacks like ubermap.

    • Mt Indigo

      “It all seems to indicate that we will soon get user-definable parameter banks for plugins… ”

      Really hope so. I’m holding off until then. Really nervous about buying another “aaalmost there” piece of music gear. Wish Ableton would state that’s on the roadmap, kind of like how Elektron has done with OverBridge develoment phases.

      • jipumarino

        Agree. I already own Push and the new one is appealing for my usage even in the current state, so I’m happy just with the current set of changes.

  • Diggin’ the videos with David, nicely done 🙂
    I think it’s nice you guys covered the Max for Live stuff. It’s pretty awesome to get three new synths in a release. Something about them being Max for Live prevents them from getting the same kind of hype you usually see when a DAW has some new instruments, but that doesn’t mean they are any less fun and useful. I’ve been having a lot of fun with the Multi, and it does remind me of the OP-1 quite a bit, even in its sound.
    Great Stuff!

    • Thomas Piper

      Word Im feeling the vids as well

    • Michael M

      Unfortunately, I find Max for Live to be a bit unstable (even Max 7 with Live 9.5 has crashed on me a couple of times). So I pretty much disregard the new synths that are Max-based. The crashes are rare, but I don’t want to end up with a track that relies on Max to play back.

      I do use Max quite a bit for MIDI effects, though, as that way I can get the sound I want, record it to a new track, then delete the devices and save a Max-free version of the track.

      I know I could do the same with the synths, by rendering them to audio, but it does make them less useful than the built-in and VST synths.

      • maxforcats

        It would be interesting to know which device has crashed on you. If a VST would crash, you wouldn’t say “i find VST’s a bit unstable”, would you?

        • Michael M

          No, but if I had random crashes on a wide variety of different VSTs, and keeping VSTs out of my ensembles kept the crashes away entirely, I would definitely say that. Unfortunately that has been my experience with Max. This might be unique to me or my platform but it’s a fact, and I have not yet found a solution.

          (Since you’re a Max for Live developer I will mention that I haven’t tried any of yours. )

          • James

            I can see both perspectives, but I tend to give everything that goes into my performance and plug-in folders a thorough stress test. The m4l synth that I simply had to delete from the browser was the Katsuhiro Chiba Classics, specifically the TX81Z
            With just about any other case with m4l synths it was a matter of not liking the resulting sound (quality) or not accepting the price I paid in cpu.

  • Diggin’ the videos with David, nicely done 🙂
    I think it’s nice you guys covered the Max for Live stuff. It’s pretty awesome to get three new synths in a release. Something about them being Max for Live prevents them from getting the same kind of hype you usually see when a DAW has some new instruments, but that doesn’t mean they are any less fun and useful. I’ve been having a lot of fun with the Multi, and it does remind me of the OP-1 quite a bit, even in its sound.
    Great Stuff!

    • Thomas Piper

      Word Im feeling the vids as well

    • Michael M

      Unfortunately, I find Max for Live to be a bit unstable (even Max 7 with Live 9.5 has crashed on me a couple of times). So I pretty much disregard the new synths that are Max-based. The crashes are rare, but I don’t want to end up with a track that relies on Max to play back.

      I do use Max quite a bit for MIDI effects, though, as that way I can get the sound I want, record it to a new track, then delete the devices and save a Max-free version of the track.

      I know I could do the same with the synths, by rendering them to audio, but it does make them less useful than the built-in and VST synths.

      • maxforcats

        It would be interesting to know which device has crashed on you. If a VST would crash, you wouldn’t say “i find VST’s a bit unstable”, would you?

        • Michael M

          No, but if I had random crashes on a wide variety of different VSTs, and keeping VSTs out of my ensembles kept the crashes away entirely, I would definitely say that. Unfortunately that has been my experience with Max. This might be unique to me or my platform but it’s a fact, and I have not yet found a solution.

          (Since you’re a Max for Live developer I will mention that I haven’t tried any of yours. )

          • James

            I can see both perspectives, but I tend to give everything that goes into my performance and plug-in folders a thorough stress test. The m4l synth that I simply had to delete from the browser was the Katsuhiro Chiba Classics, specifically the TX81Z
            With just about any other case with m4l synths it was a matter of not liking the resulting sound (quality) or not accepting the price I paid in cpu.

  • Diggin’ the videos with David, nicely done 🙂
    I think it’s nice you guys covered the Max for Live stuff. It’s pretty awesome to get three new synths in a release. Something about them being Max for Live prevents them from getting the same kind of hype you usually see when a DAW has some new instruments, but that doesn’t mean they are any less fun and useful. I’ve been having a lot of fun with the Multi, and it does remind me of the OP-1 quite a bit, even in its sound.
    Great Stuff!

    • Thomas Piper

      Word Im feeling the vids as well

    • Michael M

      Unfortunately, I find Max for Live to be a bit unstable (even Max 7 with Live 9.5 has crashed on me a couple of times). So I pretty much disregard the new synths that are Max-based. The crashes are rare, but I don’t want to end up with a track that relies on Max to play back.

      I do use Max quite a bit for MIDI effects, though, as that way I can get the sound I want, record it to a new track, then delete the devices and save a Max-free version of the track.

      I know I could do the same with the synths, by rendering them to audio, but it does make them less useful than the built-in and VST synths.

      • maxforcats

        It would be interesting to know which device has crashed on you. If a VST would crash, you wouldn’t say “i find VST’s a bit unstable”, would you?

        • Michael M

          No, but if I had random crashes on a wide variety of different VSTs, and keeping VSTs out of my ensembles kept the crashes away entirely, I would definitely say that. Unfortunately that has been my experience with Max. This might be unique to me or my platform but it’s a fact, and I have not yet found a solution.

          (Since you’re a Max for Live developer I will mention that I haven’t tried any of yours. )

          • James

            I can see both perspectives, but I tend to give everything that goes into my performance and plug-in folders a thorough stress test. The m4l synth that I simply had to delete from the browser was the Katsuhiro Chiba Classics, specifically the TX81Z
            With just about any other case with m4l synths it was a matter of not liking the resulting sound (quality) or not accepting the price I paid in cpu.

  • Stew Day

    Hanging to see how VST plugins are now better managed by Push. Push 1 gets this too right?

  • papernoise

    Thanks a lot for the great overview! I initially didn’t pay much attention to Multi, since when you open it it feels more like a preset player than an actual synth, but after seeing the video above I think I was wrong.

    Not sure I agree about what you say about the UI. Sure it looks very different from OSX, but I always felt that Ableton was light years ahead of everybody else when it came to the GUI, there’s no useless eye candy distracting you from focusing on the music, and it also doesn’t suck up all your processing power, which is much better spent on grinding numbers for the sound. How does that slow down your editing work?
    Sure, there’s a lot they could improve when it comes to zooming, dragging, moving panes and all that. For instance I still find it a bit annoying that you have to click-drag the time ruler to zoom in and out. Maybe you meant things like that?

    • Yeah, exactly. The interface design itself I think shouldn’t change – and can’t change. But the architecture of that UI is in need of some work, no doubt. Even without considering what’s happening with touch displays and higher resolution densities, I’m not sure the engineering here keeps up with what I imagine even the Abletons might like to do with the software.

      • papernoise

        Well then I totally agree with you! It’s still the good ol’Ableton Live, but times have changed a lot since v1.

    • James

      Yeah the Multi has plenty potential as the controls are all splayed out without digging into the push or whatever you like to lock macros on. Not sure if they’re the final sounds I’d work with, but they’d be good for low-profile performance and bookmarking parts.

  • papernoise

    Thanks a lot for the great overview! I initially didn’t pay much attention to Multi, since when you open it it feels more like a preset player than an actual synth, but after seeing the video above I think I was wrong.

    Not sure I agree about what you say about the UI. Sure it looks very different from OSX, but I always felt that Ableton was light years ahead of everybody else when it came to the GUI, there’s no useless eye candy distracting you from focusing on the music, and it also doesn’t suck up all your processing power, which is much better spent on grinding numbers for the sound. How does that slow down your editing work?
    Sure, there’s a lot they could improve when it comes to zooming, dragging, moving panes and all that. For instance I still find it a bit annoying that you have to click-drag the time ruler to zoom in and out. Maybe you meant things like that?

    • Yeah, exactly. The interface design itself I think shouldn’t change – and can’t change. But the architecture of that UI is in need of some work, no doubt. Even without considering what’s happening with touch displays and higher resolution densities, I’m not sure the engineering here keeps up with what I imagine even the Abletons might like to do with the software.

      • papernoise

        Well then I totally agree with you! It’s still the good ol’Ableton Live, but times have changed a lot since v1.

    • James

      Yeah the Multi has plenty potential as the controls are all splayed out without digging into the push or whatever you like to lock macros on. Not sure if they’re the final sounds I’d work with, but they’d be good for low-profile performance and place-saving parts.

  • papernoise

    Thanks a lot for the great overview! I initially didn’t pay much attention to Multi, since when you open it it feels more like a preset player than an actual synth, but after seeing the video above I think I was wrong.

    Not sure I agree about what you say about the UI. Sure it looks very different from OSX, but I always felt that Ableton was light years ahead of everybody else when it came to the GUI, there’s no useless eye candy distracting you from focusing on the music, and it also doesn’t suck up all your processing power, which is much better spent on grinding numbers for the sound. How does that slow down your editing work?
    Sure, there’s a lot they could improve when it comes to zooming, dragging, moving panes and all that. For instance I still find it a bit annoying that you have to click-drag the time ruler to zoom in and out. Maybe you meant things like that?

    • Yeah, exactly. The interface design itself I think shouldn’t change – and can’t change. But the architecture of that UI is in need of some work, no doubt. Even without considering what’s happening with touch displays and higher resolution densities, I’m not sure the engineering here keeps up with what I imagine even the Abletons might like to do with the software.

      • papernoise

        Well then I totally agree with you! It’s still the good ol’Ableton Live, but times have changed a lot since v1.

    • James

      Yeah the Multi has plenty potential as the controls are all splayed out without digging into the push or whatever you like to lock macros on. Not sure if they’re the final sounds I’d work with, but they’d be good for low-profile performance and place-saving parts.

  • Timo

    Which skin did you use for the screenshot of the multi and the poly?

    • jblk

      Also want to know this.

    • Just normal Disco Skin, actually 🙂

      • Timo

        I get orange knobs instead of blue when I select Disco :s

        • papernoise

          Max for Live devices from Ableton always have those blue knobs, no matter which skin you have selected

      • Joel Dittrich

        My favorite too.

  • Timo

    Which skin did you use for the screenshot of the multi and the poly?

    • jblk

      Also want to know this.

    • Just normal Disco Skin, actually 🙂

      • Timo

        I get orange knobs instead of blue when I select Disco :s

        • papernoise

          Max for Live devices from Ableton always have those blue knobs, no matter which skin you have selected

      • Joel Dittrich

        My favorite too.

  • Timo

    Which skin did you use for the screenshot of the multi and the poly?

    • jblk

      Also want to know this.

    • Just normal Disco Skin, actually 🙂

      • Timo

        I get orange knobs instead of blue when I select Disco :s

        • papernoise

          Max for Live devices from Ableton always have those blue knobs, no matter which skin you have selected

      • Joel Dittrich

        My favorite too.

  • jblk

    “Slice mode. Can I get a hallelujah?”

    Really missed an “Amen” break joke opportunity here.

  • jblk

    “Slice mode. Can I get a hallelujah?”

    Really missed an “Amen” break joke opportunity here.

  • jblk

    “Slice mode. Can I get a hallelujah?”

    Really missed an “Amen” break joke opportunity here.

  • Jose Barrera Martinez

    One thing i noticed is you can make simplers just from the browser and using push.But you can,t make a simpler on clip mode on session view with push!!! Future request Ableton; Right click ,over a audioclip or selection: make a simpler.Or if you a using a push in clip mode, make a simpler from selection.

    • James

      I’m probably missing the gist of your request, but converting an audio clip in place would change the track type. One thing you can do is warp a clip as you see fit and drag it directly into a simpler on another track, preserving all the decisions you made.

      • Jose Barrera Martinez

        Not in place!!! Make a separate midi track, with a simpler on it !!!
        How it,s working now, if you find a nice selection on your audio clip, or you just right click a sample, the only option Live has it,s chop audio to new track.It creates a drum rack .You only can do this with the mouse and right click!!!!
        I only want right click over a selection of audio ,create a simpler, Live will make a new midi track with a simpler on it.And if i,m using push i want this be avaliable from the controller.

  • Jose Barrera Martinez

    One thing i noticed is you can make simplers just from the browser and using push.But you can,t make a simpler on clip mode on session view with push!!! Future request Ableton; Right click ,over an audioclip or selection: make a simpler.Or if you are using push in clip mode, make a simpler from selection,avaliable from push menu.

    • James

      I’m probably missing the gist of your request, but converting an audio clip in place would change the track type. One thing you can do is warp a clip as you see fit and drag it directly into a simpler on another track, preserving all the decisions you made.

      • Jose Barrera Martinez

        Not in place!!! Make a separate midi track, with a simpler on it !!!
        How it,s working now, if you find a nice selection on your audio clip, or you just right click a sample, the only option Live has it,s chop audio to new track.It creates a drum rack .You only can do this with the mouse and right click!!!!
        I only want right click over a selection of audio ,create a simpler, Live will make a new midi track with a simpler on it.And if i,m using push i want this be avaliable from the controller.

  • Jose Barrera Martinez

    One thing i noticed is you can make simplers just from the browser and using push.But you can,t make a simpler on clip mode on session view with push!!! Future request Ableton; Right click ,over an audioclip or selection: make a simpler.Or if you are using push in clip mode, make a simpler from selection,avaliable from push menu.

    • James

      I’m probably missing the gist of your request, but converting an audio clip in place would change the track type. One thing you can do is warp a clip as you see fit and drag it directly into a simpler on another track, preserving all the decisions you made.

      • Jose Barrera Martinez

        Not in place!!! Make a separate midi track, with a simpler on it !!!
        How it,s working now, if you find a nice selection on your audio clip, or you just right click a sample, the only option Live has it,s chop audio to new track.It creates a drum rack .You only can do this with the mouse and right click!!!!
        I only want right click over a selection of audio ,create a simpler, Live will make a new midi track with a simpler on it.And if i,m using push i want this be avaliable from the controller.

  • James

    RMS metering might be my favorite as well. And I’ve been waiting to jump into a new mixer to complement my set-up. But now there’s more merit to using the encoders on a push rather than dedicated faders. Short of a motorized board, pick-up still requires some mental juggling as you move from bank to bank. Endless encoders however move the impetus to the meters, not to where the fader was last sitting.

    Although this comment belongs more in the Push 2 review, my 1st implementation critique is that I see no Banking in mixer view. The only intended way to shift 8 tracks over is through session overview (can you even do that in momentary while holding the session button down?) It just seems so obvious to me that if you’re looking at the 1st 8 tracks and there’s a big rectangle around your session grid already and they are so easily within reach, you’d want to move over to the next 8 tracks in order to have the same experience with another set of tracks, not click the cursor over one track at a time.

  • James

    RMS metering might be my favorite as well. And I’ve been waiting to jump into a new mixer to complement my set-up. But now there’s more merit to using the encoders on a push rather than dedicated faders. Short of a motorized board, pick-up still requires some mental juggling as you move from bank to bank. Endless encoders however move the impetus to the meters, not to where the fader was last sitting.

    Although this comment belongs more in the Push 2 review, my 1st implementation critique is that I see no Banking in mixer view. The only intended way to shift 8 tracks over is through session overview (can you even do that momentarily while holding the session button down, or is that shortcut only for clip view?) It just seems so obvious to me that if you’re looking at the 1st 8 tracks and there’s a big rectangle around your session grid already and they are so easily within reach, you’d want to move over to the next 8 tracks in order to have the same experience with another set of tracks, not click the cursor over one track at a time for what could be a 24, 32, 64 track session.

  • James

    RMS metering might be my favorite as well. And I’ve been waiting to jump into a new mixer to complement my set-up. But now there’s more merit to using the encoders on a push rather than dedicated faders. Short of a motorized board, pick-up still requires some mental juggling as you move from bank to bank. Endless encoders however move the impetus to the meters, not to where the fader was last sitting.

    Although this comment belongs more in the Push 2 review, my 1st implementation critique is that I see no Banking in mixer view. The only intended way to shift 8 tracks over is through session overview (can you even do that momentarily while holding the session button down, or is that shortcut only for clip view?) It just seems so obvious to me that if you’re looking at the 1st 8 tracks and there’s a big rectangle around your session grid already and they are so easily within reach, you’d want to move over to the next 8 tracks in order to have the same experience with another set of tracks, not click the cursor over one track at a time for what could be a 24, 32, 64 track session.

  • partofthepuzzle

    A UI makeover for Live might be nice, but I’d be much more enthusiastic about multi-Clip views.

    Even if it was limited to predetermined layout options (ex. 1,2 or 4 clips), it would be breakthrough for performing and DJing with Live. The thing is, this isn’t asking for a total redesign of the underpinnings: since Live already keeps track of multiple Clips, it would be a matter of surfacing it in the UI.

    Attached is a very simple mockup of a 4 Clip Session View that I did a while back.

  • partofthepuzzle

    A UI makeover for Live might be nice, but I’d be much more enthusiastic about multi-Clip views.

    Even if it was limited to predetermined layout options (ex. 1,2 or 4 clips), it would be a breakthrough for performing and DJing with Live. The thing is, this isn’t asking for a total redesign of the underpinnings: since Live already keeps track of multiple Clips, it would be a matter of surfacing it in the UI.

    Attached is a very simple mockup of a 4 Clip Session View that I did a while back.

  • partofthepuzzle

    A UI makeover for Live might be nice, but I’d be much more enthusiastic about multi-Clip views.

    Even if it was limited to predetermined layout options (ex. 1,2 or 4 clips), it would be a breakthrough for performing and DJing with Live. The thing is, this isn’t asking for a total redesign of the underpinnings: since Live already keeps track of multiple Clips, it would be a matter of surfacing it in the UI.

    Attached is a very simple mockup of a 4 Clip Session View that I did a while back.