R is a reactive, emotional robot speaker from Teenage Engineering

What if a portable speaker, the lamp from Pixar, an assembly line robot, and Wall-E had a love child that was also a toy and a synth accessory?

Accusonus explain how they’re using AI to make tools for musicians

First, there was DSP (digital signal processing). Now, there’s AI. But what does that mean? Let’s find out from the people developing it.

Regroover is the AI-powered loop unmixer, now with drag-and-drop clips

You’ve sampled. You’ve sliced. You’ve warped. So what’s left to do with loops? Accusonus have turned to machine learning for a new answer.

Tour the goodies in Universal Audio 9.4 – including an Empirical Distressor

Universal Audio are here with their winter lineup – the latest processing tools for their hardware platform – now including a sought-after compressor.

Two new ways to integrate MeeBlip triode synths with Ableton Live, free

Software control means preset recall and easy automation, on top of all that tactile control. Here’s the latest combination of our MeeBlip and Max for Live.

Real underground: watch a live set in the Copenhagen metro

You’ve seen buskers in your subway, maybe, but odds are a full-on rave is a rarity. That’s what Strøm Festival and Anastasia Kristensen gave Copenhagen’s metro.

Get a terrific Little Plate reverb from Soundtoys, free

Soundtoys are on a short list of the best plug-in developers out there. Now through Nov. 22, you get their model of the classic EMT 140 plate, for free.

Deep knowledge and free sounds for the PO-32 pocket drum machine

Teenage Engineering’s PO-32 is a powerful drum synth, literally in a calculator form factor. Now you can learn more – and update its sounds – from YouTube.

Let’s talk about open tools at Ableton Loop and beyond

From libraries to circuits to hacks to instructions, a lot of you are sharing the stuff you make. We’re using Ableton Loop to bring some of you together.

Two sequenced Max for Live devices go off the usual grid

Will a step sequencer be a tool just for expected repetition? Or can it take you somewhere different? A series called “Out Of Grid” aims for the latter.