From STEIM’s Artistic Director: Why STEIM Matters, and Thanks

From the STEIM Concert Blog, which gives some sense of who has been playing STEIM. Takuro Maizuta Lippit, aka dj sniff, writes in thanks for the international outpouring of support for the STEIM music and art research center in Amsterdam, which faces potentially losing government funding. Some readers raised some questions about why STEIM is asking for support, and what the institution’s significance is — a reasonable question — and Taku provides some background here: What makes STEIM an unique place is that it emphasizes on supporting independent artists with experimental and adventurous ideas in the live electronic art world. …

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Help Save STEIM, Dutch Music Research Center; Monday Deadline

Making new instruments from scrap at a junkyard challenge. Now it’s time to save STEIM from becoming scrap. Photo (CC) by termie. Just a "niche", eh? I can’t think of a time in recent history during which creative technology research was as profoundly relevant to mainstream design as it is now. Tangible interfaces, sensor-rich environments and pervasive computing, multi-touch and gestural interfaces, rich media — virtually all of the trends now leading technology were pioneered by or deeply influenced by research by music and visual artists. So, you’d think one of the world’s leading centers for work in research and …

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Max 5: Max/MSP/Jitter Pricing Updated

Cycling ’74 have updated Max 5’s pricing and streamlined a bit in the new release. (That means Max for MIDI and basic data crunching, MSP for audio, synthesis, and signal processing, and Jitter for video, 3D, and advanced data processing.) Since this impacts a number of our readers, it’s worth going over this. Updated: The story now reflects a clarification from Cycling ’74 over which Jitter objects work in Max/MSP.

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Virtual NIME Conference: Call for Entries!

CDM needs your help. The massive, international, annual New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) Conference is descending on New York City. That’s great. There are only two problems: 1) it’s too huge. 2) Most CDMers are not in New York. That’s where you come in. If you’re traveling to town to attend NIME, to present at NIME, or if you happen to already be here in New York and are going to the NIME events or the concurrent New York Electronic Arts Festival (which seems itself to be perhaps a new creation in itself), let us know what you’re doing. …

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