refunct

Art From Trash, as ReFunct Media Makes a Symphony from Obsolete Gear [Videos]

Obsolescence: it seems inescapable, as generations of old gear are replaced with shiny, new ones. But one person’s discarded electronic trash can be an artist’s electronic treasure. ReFunct Media is a collaborative to make something out of all that used junk. In parades of strange, twitching machines and orchestras of electronic noise, gear goes from landfill fodder to art stars. The collective effort has made its way from Ireland (Imoca, RuaRed) to France (Gaité Lyrique) to, most recently, Berlin and the LEAP gallery, where we catch up with it in the form of some raucous video documentation. The artists themselves …

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In the 70s, You Bought an Apple II to Code Crazy Graphics Yourself, So Why Not in 2012? [TV Ad]

Here’s a terrific vintage Apple II ad – one that might inspire some readers of this site to go eBay an Apple II for their next VJ gig. (Hey, it has analog video out built in, something a modern Apple … doesn’t.) Of course, what’s telling is that when this ad was made, in 1977, buying an Apple II was not about getting an ecosystem of pre-built software. Most of the examples assume you’re coding what you’re seeing yourself. Sure enough, pick up a vintage computer manual, and it more or less skips into coding right away, typically in BASIC. …

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Open Call: Kernel Festival, Your Audiovisuals, in Italy [Deadline April 30]

Just the mention of Italy tickles the art nerves in a lot of us, from its history to its ongoing culture. If that appeals to you, don’t miss this open call for a terrific festival at the beautiful Villa Tittoni Traversi in Desio, Italy (outside Milan). The Kernel Festival will feature digital and visual art, and along with entries like Mapping and LPM, definitely figures as one of the highlights for electronic creativity this summer. Mapping is a big part of the content, but just one part – more or less every medium is covered. (Disclosure: I’m on the audiovisual/mapping …

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The Light Crystal: Mesmerizing Prismatica Couples Geometric Animation, Crystals

For all the growth of three-dimensional mapping techniques, the surfaces are often (quite literally) dull. In Prismatica, an installation piece, the material is part of what makes the work so beautiful. Color and geometric form drip through the crystals like liquid, in a work that revolves like a modern, digital mandala, a kaleidoscopic meditation. The artist, Melbourne, Australia-based Kit Webster, sends this work this way, and writes: Prismatica consists of an arrangement of pyramid-shaped crystals affixed to an LCD screen and illuminated with programmed geometric animation. The animated patterns are precisely mapped to the vertices of the crystals, illuminating them …

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unravel

FOUND Installation Plays Narration, Robotic Music with Vinyl, Unravels Truth

One perhaps unexpected impact of technology has been to change the way we think about ourselves and our experience. Recording equipment – from photography to phonograph – has given us a new sense that memory itself might be fixed, unchanging, an accurate record of an unmoving truth. Except, of course, neither the recorded object nor the thing it is recording ever quite seems to work out that way. (Ask your local theoretical physicist, or for a more localized, humanized, sociological view, any loved one.) UNRAVEL is an installation that uses just those sorts of technologies to construct a narrative, and …

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paperNote1

Voice Messages Become 3D Paper Waveform Sculptures: Paper Note

Instead of writing on paper, a sound executed in paper in three dimensions. All images courtesy the artists. Speaking of making the ephemeral tangible, as artist Andrew Spitz tells us, “it’s a fun process to map something that is so fleeting as a sound to a physical object.” That’s what he does in a new collaboration with Andrew Nip of the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design in Denmark. It’s a simple process – and that’s a good thing, as it means anyone with access to a laser cutter can get in on the fun. Using software written in the open …

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DIY 3D Volumetric Displays + Kinect, Insane GIF Animation Mash-Ups, in Opening at NYC’s Eyebeam

Then: flat, rectangular displays. Now: projection mapping flat images to 3D objects. Next: volumetric displays. From New York’s Chelsea neighborhood come two very inventive visual projects, opening in January. Matt Parker, veteran of New York University’s ITP brain-building program (don’t ask what it stands for), leads research at NYC’s Eyebeam in some seriously-cool volumetric display tech. With the addition of Kinect, it takes on a human element. And an upcoming DIY kit means you’ll soon be able to build one of these yourself. Lumarca is a truly volumetric display which allows viewers to see three dimensional images and motion. The …

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DIY 3D Volumetric Displays + Kinect, Insane GIF Animation Mash-Ups, in Opening at NYC's Eyebeam

Then: flat, rectangular displays. Now: projection mapping flat images to 3D objects. Next: volumetric displays. From New York’s Chelsea neighborhood come two very inventive visual projects, opening in January. Matt Parker, veteran of New York University’s ITP brain-building program (don’t ask what it stands for), leads research at NYC’s Eyebeam in some seriously-cool volumetric display tech. With the addition of Kinect, it takes on a human element. And an upcoming DIY kit means you’ll soon be able to build one of these yourself. Lumarca is a truly volumetric display which allows viewers to see three dimensional images and motion. The …

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Föhnseher Scoops Images from Wireless to Analog TV; in Berlin Saturday, More Julian Oliver

Julian Oliver’s “Föhnseher” spies on images on a wifi network, then “broadcasts” them to that older, less “pull”-based medium, the analog television. Have a look at the demonstration, as made by fellow media artist Servando Barreiro. Föhnseher rises from the scrap heap of analog TV. Unlike other televisions, Föhnseher captures and displays images downloaded by people on surrounding local wireless networks. Other people’s phones, laptops and tablet computers all become broadcast stations for this device, replacing the forgotten television towers of old. The name föhnseher derives from fernseher, the German word for television, and the föhn, a strange warm wind …

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