Reminder: Noise Toy Making, Alternative Music Software Playing Tonight in Brooklyn!

Make me! Once a month, CDM goes from its virtual state to a sort of augmented reality existence in Brooklyn. (In Williamsburg, no less, which has itself been augmenting itself into neighborhoods formerly known as Bushwick.) Tonight is one of those times. If you’re in Brooklyn, you should come enter our physical dimensions so you can: make your own NoiseToy with Loud Objects’ Tristan Perich, and take it home for the low, low price of ten clams. (Dollars, though I think clams are actually worth more at the moment. I’ll eat the clams.) witness strange, wonderful things happen in the …

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Circuit-Bent Browser: Webcrawlers Make Live Visuals

Hacker extraorindaire Gijs Gieskes has turned your local web browser into an insane, glitched-out audiovisual instrument. He writes: Here is a new project, it involves using webcrawlers to make live visuals with music. <http://gieskes.nl/browserjockey/>. works quite o.k. The music is some of my old recordings on mini disc’s i still had.. mostly 2000 till 2003 i think, its just to show the scripts in action. Some more description is here <http://gieskes.nl/?archive=browser-jockey> Flickr? YouTube? Explode? If you could actually circuit-bend web browser code, the results might look something like this. Think of it as a software short-circuit. (The famous example of …

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Handmade Motion: DIY Visuals Wanted for Brooklyn Event, Too

It’s called “Handmade Music,” but I’m hopeful CDM’s ongoing DIY party in Brooklyn will start to add more visualists. Jay Smith of Livid has made an appearance, and most recently we were able to feature the wonderful, circuit-bent Nintendo console motion art of noteNdo (Jeff Donaldson), pictured above. We have a lovely projector ready to go and lots of interesting spaces on which to project. This month’s edition will also feature great music by Terry Dame and the Electric Junkyard Gamelan; it’d be great to have some live visuals with it. Info on the current Handmade Music: Handmade Music 2/19: …

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On Demand: CDM Winter 2008, with Gift Guide, Bending and Slicing Tutorials, More

“What if, instead of targeting Web content to a single day, you turned it into an object that would last a season? What would you want to save and savor?” That’s the question I ask at the beginning of the Create Digital Music Winter 08 guide. We’ve filled it with good stuff we love, plus good stuff we hear that you love (via our survey of hundreds of readers for the holiday guide). Via Creative Commons-licensed images, you’ve shared your world of music, and so we share the whole guide as fully free work (it’s got a CC Attribution / …

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Sega Master System, NES as Audio Effect; Videos Coming from Blip Fest

8-bit audiovisual party Blip Fest started last night here in New York, so it’s only natural we celebrate game systems used for music through the weekend in its honor. (Reminder: come meet up with me and Boing Boing’s Joel Johnson tonight, 6-8p, if you’re going to Blip. Facebook event / CDM post) Sega Master Bitcrunch The promising new – and music-savvy, I might add – Boing Boing Offworld gaming blog points to a Sega Master System II that’s been turned into a bitcrush/digital overdrive effect. It sounds absolutely terrible. You know – in a good way. Bender / chip artist …

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Create Analog Motion: Stroboscope Creation Animates Sequences, Syncs to Game Boy Music

The stroboscope, dating back to 1832, is likely the earliest animation device. This is motion graphics, 19th Century-style: rotating a series of images and sync the speed of the rotation so the observer sees motion. Modern hacker, bender, chiptune musician, and artist Gijs Gieskes has his own spin on the idea: he’s built an electronic stroboscope that can record sequences of motion and sync the animations to the clock of Game Boy musical app LSDJ. It’s a mind-bending combination of vintage animation techniques, 8-bit music, and VJing. strobovj from Gijs on Vimeo. Gijs’ description: The left knob sets the speed …

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Alternative Theremin: On Your Wrist, in a Mug of Tea

Neither of these items is “news,” but since I missed them, you may have, too — and because they’re so absurd and wonderful, I can’t let that happen. Some things are timeless. Via Chris Cheung’s Hong Kong’s-based Special Interest Group comes the Theremin Watch, “Modified (circuit bend) from 大人之科學 kit set.” I love the idea of a wrist-mounted Theremin. On one hand (ahem), it does mean that you can calibrate relative to your body, because it’s always strapped to your wrist. On the other, I expect that’s still something of a challenge. But it’s not so often you get wearable …

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Today: Circuit Bending in the Netherlands

The Netherlands is already a artistic-technological hotbed, and today (Wed. 29.10) some of their best circuit benders are gathering in one place, including regular favorite of ours Gijs Gieskes. (Gijs made the wonderful, spinning device above, which I missed when it came out — see it on Music thing.) If you can make it, we’d love a report! 29 oktober ‘s-Hertogenbosch (The Netherlands) Nerdlab (initiative of CBK-Digitale workshop) organises topic evenings in the Verkadefabriek with artists who work on the borders between art, science and physics. The topic of the first edition is circuit bending. On this evening the following …

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“Where’s the Party At?” Bendable, Open DIY Sampler Brings 8-bit Back

Todd Bailey’s “Where’s the Party At?” wants to return to a simpler, glitchier era of sampling. When CDM spoke to Hank Shocklee, Public Enemy’s legendary producer, he talked about how those artists really preferred earlier samplers because of, not in spite of, their flaws. And because lo-fi is a little easier to pull off, this makes a great project. WTPA is an open source 8-bit digital sampler kit, designed to be hacker and bender friendly. Inspired by the preponderance of wack samplers proliferating in music today, WTPA brings back the fun, the danger, and the aliasing errors. Todd tells CDM …

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