Another Max/MSP 5 Preview, With Some Subtle Goodies Revealed

Vlad Spears, musician, programmer and maker of the Davel.Plugs audio plugins (previously reviewed on CDM) has a write-up about the forthcoming Max/MSP 5. Andrew Benson of Cycling ’74 gave a presentation at the Bay Area Computer Music Technology Meetup and Vlad kindly drew up a report. Most of the features he describes will not be new to those who’ve been awaiting Max 5, with the possible exception of: – Say goodbye to [prepend set] messages! Message boxes have a right inlet specifically for this function. – Multiple live views on the same patch, at different magnification levels. As someone who …

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Radiohead, Max/MSP, a Lost Authorization, and Self-Pricing

It seems even Radiohead sometimes lose their copy protection authorization for Max/MSP. That doesn’t stop our friends at Cycling ’74 support from getting a bit cheeky. But careful what you say: it might wind up as the lead to a New York Times article: SHORTLY after Radiohead released its album “In Rainbows” online in October, the band misplaced its password for Max/MSP, a geek-oriented music software package that the guitarist Jonny Greenwood uses constantly. It wasn’t the first time it had happened, Mr. Greenwood said over a cup of tea at the venerable Randolph Hotel here. As usual Radiohead contacted …

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What's New for Jitter in Max 5

Though most of what’s new in Max 5 is concentrated in Max and MSP, there will be a few treats for Jitter users. First and foremost is the new Matrix Probe: hover your mouse over a green matrix patchcord and you’ll be presented with a floating preview of the matrix passing through it along with information such as dimensions, planecount and other info. This will be a great timesaver — no longer will you have to drop in four jit.pwindows, four jit.fps’s and jit.unpack to find out whether the video you’re sending is the video you think you’re sending. Gregory …

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What’s New for Jitter in Max 5

Though most of what’s new in Max 5 is concentrated in Max and MSP, there will be a few treats for Jitter users. First and foremost is the new Matrix Probe: hover your mouse over a green matrix patchcord and you’ll be presented with a floating preview of the matrix passing through it along with information such as dimensions, planecount and other info. This will be a great timesaver — no longer will you have to drop in four jit.pwindows, four jit.fps’s and jit.unpack to find out whether the video you’re sending is the video you think you’re sending. Gregory …

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First Max 5 Preview: Music Patching, the Next Generation?

Not just skin deep: Changing the Max interface should make it easier and faster to produce patches for beginners and advanced users alike. What’s this new Max about, and why was it such a big deal at the AES trade show? To really understand, let’s turn to gaming for a moment. When Nintendo described their vision for the Wii, they talked about appealing to three groups of customers: The “hard-core” gamer; that is, their existing audience, of course “Lapsed” gamers: people who had done some gaming at some point but lost interest Entirely new gamers, across a variety of demographics …

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First Max 5 Details Are Here (And More to Come)

It’s no secret that a major update to Max/MSP/Jitter is coming from Cycling ’74, with a major overhaul of the underlying code and an entirely new, friendlier interface. What has been secret is just what that upgrade will look like. We still don’t know what it’ll look like visually, but Cycling ’74 today released some new details about what it is and isn’t. In short, it promises to be: Easier to use: Multiple undo, debugging tools for patches, and a visual catalog for perusing objects. Easier to learn: Integrated, rewritten documentation, even including Web links. Easier on the eyes: A …

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Jitter Update for Windows Users

Cycling 74 has updated its Jitter 1.6.3 installer, while there are no new features, they’ve worked hard on optimizing speed for Windows users. I don’t have a Windows machine to benchmark, but if you are a Jitter user on Windows, you might want to give this a once over. Jitter 1.6.3 Ed.: I do have a Windows machine; I’ll try to check it out! Of course, this isn’t necessarily the really big Max news at the moment. It’s interesting, given that Cycling is talking about how different the new codebase is for Max 5 — maybe in fact there are …

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Cycling ’74 Releases Max 5 Details: Bringing Max Out of the 80s, Into the Future

Cycling ’74 hasn’t yet made a screen shot of the next version of Max public, so instead we offer this blurry picture of the current version, courtesy a lovely patch Peter Segerstrom was using with his Monome last night. If you squint really hard… Love it or hate it, there simply is no graphical development environment for musical and multimedia anywhere near as deep as Max. Max remains the most powerful “blank slate”, custom creative software around, and it’s allowed two decades of artists to create their own tools without coding. Today, David Zicarelli, the Big Kahuna at Cycling ’74 …

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New Multi-Touch Visual Hardware, Multi-Touch Tablet PC Coming?

Most of the emphasis on working with multi-touch and alternative controllers has been on our sister site, Create Digital Music. But in a way, visuals are even more demanding of new hardware. After all, musicians have all kinds of hardware that work perfectly for performance (keyboards, knobs, drums, violins, sousaphones, kazoos, and whatnot). But new visual performance media demand something different if they’re to evolve. Oh yeah, that, and most pro visual apps are kind of a b**** to use with a mouse and aren’t all that much better with a tablet. (Unless you’re somehow discovered the secret and find …

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M Interactive Composer: Retro Software, Now Intel Mac Native, Core MIDI-ready

Here’s a blast from the past — an algorithmic compositional blast from the past, that is. M is a unique piece of software for “interactive composition.” With patterns, cycles, and conducting options, you can create algorithmically-generated music, adjusting various parameters for sophisticated results rather than sequencing directly. It’s a totally different approach to working, something that’s easier to experience than to describe. M launched way back in 1987 and eventually support Atari, Amiga, Mac, and Windows; it was a big hit in the years afterward. The creators were David Zicarelli (now with Cycling ’74, and a sort of father to …

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