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Q+A: How the THX Deep Note Creator Remade His Iconic Sound

How do you improve upon a sound that is already shorthand for noises that melt audiences’ faces off? And how do you revisit sound code decades after the machines that ran it are scrapped? We get a chance to find out, as the man behind the THX “Deep Note” sound talks about its history and reissue. Dr. Andy Moorer, the character I called “the most interesting digital audio engineer in the world,” has already been terrifically open in talking about his sonic invention. He’s got more to say – and the audience is listening. (Sorry, I sort of had to …

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Share, a Tool for Sharing Processing Sketches; What’s the Best Way to Share Code?

Share, the thesis project of Yannick Assogba in the MIT Media Lab Sociable Media Group, is an interesting idea in coding: it’s basically a peer-to-peer sketchbook for creative code. All of your sketches are synced to everyone else’s sketches, and Share tracks the connections between users. http://share.media.mit.edu/about You get more from Share than you would from simply, say, sharing a Subversion repository. Share not only syncs code and changes, but also tracks each time you copy and paste code from elsewhere, so that code snippets borrowed from others can be traced through the people using the system. Up to 30 …

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Share, a Tool for Sharing Processing Sketches; What’s the Best Way to Share Code?

Share, the thesis project of Yannick Assogba in the MIT Media Lab Sociable Media Group, is an interesting idea in coding: it’s basically a peer-to-peer sketchbook for creative code. All of your sketches are synced to everyone else’s sketches, and Share tracks the connections between users. http://share.media.mit.edu/about You get more from Share than you would from simply, say, sharing a Subversion repository. Share not only syncs code and changes, but also tracks each time you copy and paste code from elsewhere, so that code snippets borrowed from others can be traced through the people using the system. Up to 30 …

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MostPixelsEver Updates, and Run Lola Run Frames on a Big, Big, Big, Big Screen

Filament @ Tyneside Cinema Launch – The Wall from Steve Holmes on Vimeo. Dan Shiffman’s Run Lola Run creation, built in Processing, appears here at Tyneside Cinema in the UK. This is how to watch a movie: 1400 frames on screen at a time. Cuts cascade across the screen, colors shift as the in-frame palette changes, and Lola’s action turns into sculptural wallpaper. There’s no better time to mention that Dan’s Most Pixels Ever library is getting some fall semester refreshes, with new documentation and other improvements. If you haven’t used it before, this is your ticket to working on …

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