acidmachine

Kill Some Time Making Acid in a Browser, And Other Fun Tricks

Error 303, anyone? Computation is everywhere – phones, tablets, watches (apparently), and yes, browsers in all of those places. And that computational power can be harnessed to completely distract you from doing real work in the office — um, I mean, make music. “Acid Machine Beta” is a rather fun implementation of two synths and a drum machine, all running in your browser. The “Randomize” function alone should hook you for a bit. Beyond that, you get a decent complement of synth and percussion controls that could make a reasonable little groove. (Recording isn’t directly possible, but you could route …

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pedalboard

Guitar Stompbox in Your Browser? Web Audio Adds Line In, iPhone Support, More

Watching a skyscraper go up is always fascinating. For a long time, the thing basically looks like a bit pit in the ground. After some time, you get the beginnings of a skeleton. Suddenly, the structure rises at a near-impossible pace, climbing into the clouds faster than you’d imagine. Then, it’s at a point when it looks finished, but isn’t – there’s this final, agonizing push to make it really inhabitable for everyone. Yep, new standards are often the same way. Web audio had, in comparison to conventional native development, looked largely like that gaping hole in the ground for …

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plink

Plink: Play Music with Strangers, In Your Browser; and the Webby Music Goodness Continues

It starts as just another toy to play around with in a few minutes of distraction in your Web browser – as if the Web were short on distraction. But then, something amazing can happen. Like a musical Turing Test, you start to get a feeling for what’s happening on the other side. Someone’s stream of colored dots starts to jam with your stream of colored dots. You get a little rhythm, a little interplay going. And instead of being a barrier, the fact that you’re looking at simple animations and made-up names and playing a pretty little tune with …

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3D Meets Open Video: HTML5 + NVIDIA + WebM + Firefox

Got this hardware? Then watch YouTube go into 3D. All you need is to get a friend to toss some fish from behind your monitor to complete the effect. (See: Muppets Take Manhattan.) The promise of genuinely open video isn’t just making something “open” for the sake of it. Realizing that potential means doing something you might not otherwise. In the midst of all this griping about Flash and codecs, you’d want Web video to actually do something it hadn’t done before. It’s just a step, but here’s one possibility: Mozilla today announced a collaboration with NVIDIA to add stereoscopic …

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More WebGL Fun: Use Shaders in a Browser, Play a Game with Fireflies

If your WebGL appetite still wants more 3D goodness in your browser, here are two additional examples since last week’s story. Via Tiago, Shadertoy is an in-browser renderer that allows you to edit shader code in GLSL (the basic language of an OpenGL GPU) and render it in-browser. The only bad news is that this project from 2009 may not have kept up with rapidly-changing browser specs; for me, 2D shaders worked perfectly on an NVIDIA 320M, but not anything 3D, in either Chrome or Firefox. But some of you know much more about this than I do, so have …

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WebGL in Chrome, Experiments Shows OpenGL in the Browser; What It Is, What It's Not

Mmmmmm … multi-dimensional. Photo (CC-BY) fdecomite Attention, 3D fans: OpenGL in the browser has gradually gotten real. WebGL is a browser-friendly API for OpenGL graphics, and it’s pretty darned close to OpenGL ES 2.0, which in turn will be familiar to anyone doing modern mobile 3D development. WebGL isn’t part of HTML5, but HTML5 makes it possible: the Canvas element is what allows WebGL to work its magic. And WebGL goes nicely with technologies that are part of HTML5 or modern browser experiments, including the web audio API and browser video support. (The superb 20 Things I Learned About Browsers …

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WebGL in Chrome, Experiments Shows OpenGL in the Browser; What It Is, What It’s Not

Mmmmmm … multi-dimensional. Photo (CC-BY) fdecomite Attention, 3D fans: OpenGL in the browser has gradually gotten real. WebGL is a browser-friendly API for OpenGL graphics, and it’s pretty darned close to OpenGL ES 2.0, which in turn will be familiar to anyone doing modern mobile 3D development. WebGL isn’t part of HTML5, but HTML5 makes it possible: the Canvas element is what allows WebGL to work its magic. And WebGL goes nicely with technologies that are part of HTML5 or modern browser experiments, including the web audio API and browser video support. (The superb 20 Things I Learned About Browsers …

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Google Hands Open Video a Huge Win, as Misconceptions Persist

Google ups the ante. H.264, it’s on. Of course, given the entrenchment of existing videos and the Flash plug-in, many are predicting the “die tryin’” scenario is the more likely one. Time will tell. Photo (CC-BY) Linus Bohman. Today, Google announced it is omitting H.264 support from its Chrome browser, in favor of free and patent-unencumbered VP8 (via the WebM container) and OGG Theora codecs. Simply put, it’s the biggest victory the open video camp has gotten in a landscape that has largely seemed tilted against them. The long-term outcome is, fairly, anyone’s guess. But you can at least mark …

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Generative Art in Internet Cafe Browsers; Marius Watz in Processing.js

Tonight, interactive artists are taking over an Internet Cafe and turning it into exhibition space, running artworks that function in regular browsers. Artists: Erik Andersson, Cory Arcangel, Michael Bell-Smith, Charles Broskoski, Jon Cates, Aleksandra Domanovic, Doubble Happiness, Constant Dullaart, JODI, JK Keller, Greg Leuch, Olia Lialina & Dragan Espenschied, Duncan Malashock, Eva & Franco Mattes aka 0100101110101101.ORG, Aaron Meyers, Mark Napier, Katja Novitskova, Paper Rad, Jon Rafman, Ariel Rebel, Ryder Ripps, Evan Roth, Brad Troemel, Marius Watz Aram Bartholl is curating; the event runs tonight on 90 Bowery in New York from 8-11p. http://fffff.at/speed-show-4/ But this is doubly worth mentioning, …

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Apple-Centric Observers Get the Facts Wrong: H.264 Still Ain’t Free

CC-BY-NC-SAFrancesco Lodolo. Addendum to the previous story: an “end user” and an “application” are not the same thing. Watching comments from some users dumping on Firefox and Opera because they don’t understand this is painful. Watching it come from journalists is even more so. There seems to be a fundamental misunderstanding about what today’s announcement met. The “free” applies to end user, free, “broadcast” Internet video. It doesn’t apply to the tools you use even to view that video – including Firefox. Here’s the deal: today’s “free forever” MPEG LA announcement was mostly a PR coup. It changes very little: …

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