Android Tablet Tidbits: Good News for Live Visuals

Killer app: live HD visual performance. Okay… yeah, we’re crazy. While it’s not relevant to this story, this particular graphic of the Xoom has an interesting feature – the gray areas illustrate thumb range on the form factor. Photo (CC-BY) Nick Butcher. Clear all the tablet hype away, and consider this: if someone told you a few short years ago that you could soon have a flat computer with HD screen and HD output, multi-touch interface, two cameras, and real OpenGL graphics, you would probably have fallen out of your chair. If you then said it’d also run Processing and …

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Joys of OpenGL in a Browser: WebGL 1.0 Release and Dev Goodies, and Play with Fractals Right Now

It’s a great time to be coding 3D – and a great time to be destroying your workday playing with 3D – thanks to free and open resources for OpenGL, now even in the browser. If lovers of 3D dreamt up a standard for getting hardware-accelerated 3D in a browser, they’d have a tough time topping WebGL. It’s cross-platform and truly (cough, H.264 video) royalty-free – not just for some people under some circumstances, but for everybody, all the time. With similar code to the OpenGL ES 2.0 API, porting to mobile (where it fits in your hand) or native/desktop …

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WebGL in Chrome, Experiments Shows OpenGL in the Browser; What It Is, What It’s Not

Mmmmmm … multi-dimensional. Photo (CC-BY) fdecomite Attention, 3D fans: OpenGL in the browser has gradually gotten real. WebGL is a browser-friendly API for OpenGL graphics, and it’s pretty darned close to OpenGL ES 2.0, which in turn will be familiar to anyone doing modern mobile 3D development. WebGL isn’t part of HTML5, but HTML5 makes it possible: the Canvas element is what allows WebGL to work its magic. And WebGL goes nicely with technologies that are part of HTML5 or modern browser experiments, including the web audio API and browser video support. (The superb 20 Things I Learned About Browsers …

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WebGL in Chrome, Experiments Shows OpenGL in the Browser; What It Is, What It's Not

Mmmmmm … multi-dimensional. Photo (CC-BY) fdecomite Attention, 3D fans: OpenGL in the browser has gradually gotten real. WebGL is a browser-friendly API for OpenGL graphics, and it’s pretty darned close to OpenGL ES 2.0, which in turn will be familiar to anyone doing modern mobile 3D development. WebGL isn’t part of HTML5, but HTML5 makes it possible: the Canvas element is what allows WebGL to work its magic. And WebGL goes nicely with technologies that are part of HTML5 or modern browser experiments, including the web audio API and browser video support. (The superb 20 Things I Learned About Browsers …

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H.264 Advocates Get Out Their Tinfoil Hats in Wake of Chrome Decision

I’ll open with what I just said to some (perfectly reasonable) questions raised by Øivind Idsø on Twitter: most users make video with proprietary software and watch it in Flash. The idea is to change that. It turns out to be hard. Open video advocates have now gotten some huge gifts from Google; I’m disinclined to look that gift horse in the mouth, as the saying goes. If you do, though, I don’t think you see anything too terribly unexpected. Meanwhile… ah, Web commentary is adorable, isn’t it? The latest conspiracy theory is that Google dropping H.264 support from its …

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Google Hands Open Video a Huge Win, as Misconceptions Persist

Google ups the ante. H.264, it’s on. Of course, given the entrenchment of existing videos and the Flash plug-in, many are predicting the “die tryin’” scenario is the more likely one. Time will tell. Photo (CC-BY) Linus Bohman. Today, Google announced it is omitting H.264 support from its Chrome browser, in favor of free and patent-unencumbered VP8 (via the WebM container) and OGG Theora codecs. Simply put, it’s the biggest victory the open video camp has gotten in a landscape that has largely seemed tilted against them. The long-term outcome is, fairly, anyone’s guess. But you can at least mark …

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Google Translate Beatboxing

Google Translate’s pronunciations may or may not impress you, but the thing’s got some beatboxing skills. Reddit user harrichr notes a fun result: 1) Go to Google Translate 2) Set the translator to translate German to German 3) Copy + paste the following into the translate box: pv zk pv pv zk pv zk kz zk pv pv pv zk pv zk zk pzk pzk pvzkpkzvpvzk kkkkkk bsch 4) Click “listen” 5) Be amazed 🙂 Does it count as beatboxing if the voice is non-human? (Okay, okay, yeah, you could do this on your own with just about anything by …

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Editorial: MPEG LA Extends Royalty-Free License for H.264, Sorta – But Not Much Changes

The good news: a lot of “broadcast” Internet video is free forever on AVC and H.264. The bad news: everything else still costs money, not much else changes, and you can expect the next battle will be a protracted patent debate. Whee! Photo (CC-BY) Bill Jacobus. MPEG LA, the group that holds the patent pool for AVC (best known for the H.264 codec) and licenses said pool to third parties, has extended its royalty-free license for free, end-user playback of its video. That extends a deadline from what had been December 15, 2015 to an indefinite date, and it removes …

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YouTube Adds Online Video Editing As You Upload; Great for Quick Demo Reels

Upload, edit – the two are back together again on YouTube. Google Operating System was sharp enough to notice the change. (Thanks, Lifehacker) Aside from the player interface, the whole interface makes use of HTML5, though it’s not as sophisticated as a former Flash-based “remix” tool that YouTube offered, then discontinued. (That seems to be the nature of the design of the tool more than the comparative functionality of Flash and browsers.) What’s nice is that videos in your account appear automatically, ready to drag, trip, and compose. You can add audio from YouTube’s AudioSwap service, with accompanying advertising, though …

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And Just Like That, WebM, Vorbis, and VP8 Became Real Open Video Standards

What happened to the Internet standards advocates who got everything they ever wanted? They lived happily ever afte— now, wait a minute. Microsoft, Apple – you guys better not play the Grinch on this one, ‘kay? Photo (CC-BY) love♡janine. Shifts in standards usually take place at a glacial pace. This one may have just happened overnight. Yesterday, the future of Web audiovisual content remained murky. You could choose H.264, a format that all but locked out open source software and threatened license fees down the road. Or you could opt for Ogg Theora, a format that was open but had …

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