For 120 fps Slow Motion Alone, iPhone 5S Became the Visualist Phone of Choice

iPhone 5s Test Footage – 120 fps from Rishi Kaneria on Vimeo. Three words for VJs and visualists: shoot more footage. You’ll find plenty of reviews of the new iPhone 5S for photography applications, but perhaps most compelling is its impressive 120-fps slow motion, which is stunning for something that’s included in a mobile phone. Overnight, the 5S has become the visualist phone of choice – that is, if you’re investing in a new phone. And I have to say, generally, while other rivals (notably Samsung and Nokia) ship phones with good optics, Apple seems to have the edge in …

READ MORE →

Pro Tools 11 Boosts Performance, Video; USB Interfaces Add iOS Support; AVID Uncertainties Remain

Avid has announced Pro Tools 11, the latest version of their flagship DAW. There are no whiz-bang features in this upgrade; instead, it seems Avid was solely focused on performance. Those improvements look promising; real-world performance is one of those things that makes the biggest difference in day-in, day-out use. The engine rewrite is joined here by top-of-class video integration, benefiting from Pro Tools’ sister products in video at Avid. These still will do little to sway users of other DAWs, but that’s not new. What is new is seeing a Pro Tools upgrade overshadowed by uncertainty about its developer. …

READ MORE →

V-4 Video Mixer, Now HDMI: First Look at Roland's V-4EX

For years, the Roland V-4 was the battle axe of the VJ and visual performance scene. Not owning one almost meant you weren’t serious about playing. And the ubiquity of these at community events meant more collaborative and back-to-back sets. Then computers evolved past – and even dropped – composite/component analog video outs, and the V-4 was left behind. The V-8 was a step forward, but still couldn’t keep up with the shift in video ins and outs. At last, we get the Roland V-4EX. Like the original V-4, it’s a four-channel mixer with effects. And it shares the V-4’s …

READ MORE →

V-4 Video Mixer, Now HDMI: First Look at Roland’s V-4EX

For years, the Roland V-4 was the battle axe of the VJ and visual performance scene. Not owning one almost meant you weren’t serious about playing. And the ubiquity of these at community events meant more collaborative and back-to-back sets. Then computers evolved past – and even dropped – composite/component analog video outs, and the V-4 was left behind. The V-8 was a step forward, but still couldn’t keep up with the shift in video ins and outs. At last, we get the Roland V-4EX. Like the original V-4, it’s a four-channel mixer with effects. And it shares the V-4’s …

READ MORE →

Roland's V-4 Goes HD: V-40HD Multi-Format Mixer, Output Up to 1080p [Gallery]

At last, Edirol – now, make that Roland Systems Group – has a successor to the V-4 that works with HD inputs and outputs. The V-40HD is called “switcher,” but multi-format “mixer” would be just as apt. It handles resolutions up to 1080p, with a variety of inputs – including standard-def composite and component up to VGA and HDMI. Roland also mentions DVI-D, but to do that you’ll need to break out HDMI connections. (Only HDMI jacks are available on the hardware; see our gallery.) Our friend Grant Davis, aka VJ Culture, apparently has one, so we’re looking forward to …

READ MORE →

Roland’s V-4 Goes HD: V-40HD Multi-Format Mixer, Output Up to 1080p [Gallery]

At last, Edirol – now, make that Roland Systems Group – has a successor to the V-4 that works with HD inputs and outputs. The V-40HD is called “switcher,” but multi-format “mixer” would be just as apt. It handles resolutions up to 1080p, with a variety of inputs – including standard-def composite and component up to VGA and HDMI. Roland also mentions DVI-D, but to do that you’ll need to break out HDMI connections. (Only HDMI jacks are available on the hardware; see our gallery.) Our friend Grant Davis, aka VJ Culture, apparently has one, so we’re looking forward to …

READ MORE →

Touchscreen + HD Mixing + H.264 Video, Right Now, DIY [Arduino, Awesomeness]

Here’s another episode in the gradually-evolving HD mixing revolution. VJ Anomolee, aka Mattheiu Brooks, has put together one incredible rig. One $140 HDMI touchscreen. One Arduino with Ethernet. And then the engine of the thing, the Blackmagic Design ATEM Television Studio, which costs under US$1000 / 900 €, but provides HD video mixing, built-in H.264 video encoding, and multiple preview outputs, among other features. Put them together, and you have something really futuristic for about the price of a MacBook Air. In fact, “mixing” doesn’t really cover it. This is an all-in-one video toolset that would be hard to get …

READ MORE →

Carrot HD Video Mixer + Controller, in Edirol V4-Style Layout, Coming Soon [Exclusive Prototype Details]

HD Rabbit – Introduction from carrotvideo on Vimeo. I keep waiting to write this headline and talk about something that’s shipping. But it might at last happen. We might finally be able to cover an HD mixer that lets you easily plug in two computers and mix as easily as you have done for years with analog inputs. It’s called the HD Rabbit, from upstart Carrot Video, designed by VJs for VJs – and yes, you might even be able to afford it. You know what you want. You’ve known for a long time. You want a mixer that works …

READ MORE →

The Era of Hardware Mixing for Laptops Cometh: SPARK D-FUSER Available

*spark d-fuser: demo from toby*spark on Vimeo. It’s been a long time coming, but it’s nearly here. The first hardware mixing for laptops that’s practical and affordable for the visual community has arrived. And it should be just the tip of the iceberg. Back in 2009, we celebrated Toby Spark’s community-led video mixing, and bravely (perhaps bravely and prematurely) declared that the era of high-quality hardware mixing was at hand. It is, of course, a simple premise. You’ve got one laptop, and you want to crossfade to another. And you don’t want to use an analog signal – least of …

READ MORE →

High-Quality, Augmented Filmmaking as Kinect Meets DSLR; Musing on Raw Data

The Kinect camera is built first and foremost to be a three-dimensional sensor, not so much a “camera” in regards to fidelity of the visible image. But what if that data could meet the optics filmmakers want, in a single, calibrated image? The free and open source RGB+D Toolkit answers that need. It’s a combination of tools and knowledge – the mount to combine a Microsoft Kinect camera with your nice, DSLR camera, plus software for bringing everything together. But seeing it in action is the real joy. Check out the workshop results above, filmed at Barcelona’s HANGER, and overview …

READ MORE →