Watch an amazing unboxing and jam with MeeBlip triode

Working in the synth business is basically one of the most fun things you can do. So in addition to the pleasure of getting reports from owners, we wake to total surprises like this video from Olivier Ozoux, who has made a terrific stop motion unboxing video and live jam with the synth. MeeBlip joins the Korg electribe sampler and Squarp Pyramid sequencer for a rather fine all-hardware setup. You watch the triode emerge from its box, where it’s been hand-packed by MeeBlip creator James Grahame, then dive into the jam. (He manages to make the resonance sound like an …


A rabbit and a guinea pig playing Korg is the most amazing jam ever

Drop whatever you’re doing and watch this video of a rabbit and a guinea pig playing Korg. It’s likely to be one of the most amazing synth jams you’ve ever seen.


Here are some space-y solar Moog sounds by Erika

Yes, it’s the end of the week. Time to chill out. Time to let our friend Erika from Detroit help us to drift like a cosmic butterfly into some nice solar drift, held aloft by the delicate siren song of that new Moog semi-modular thing we’re all kinda eyeing lustfully. Oops, sorry, lost my train of thought there. Indeed, the folks at Moog have been putting out a steady stream of Mother-32 videos, and here’s the chill-est of them so far. Description: * Patch performed live * No overdubs * In this short improvisation, Detroit-based electronic artist, Erika, composes a …


The Joy of Little Boxes, and Lovely Music by Recue x Jolea

From small boxes, big sound, and enormous fun… Something has happened in the evolution of electronic music production. What was once so often a slow process has become a jam, what was carefully orchestrated on screens finds itself embodied in gear. And small and affordable “toys” can often deliver the greatest “switch-on-and-play” satisfaction. Helsinki’s Recue and Jolea first found their way to their album by playing live, so it’s fitting we start with a live set from them. Their fusion is beat-driven, left-field pop – settling into moody, experimental grooves with effortless hooks over top. It’s melancholy surfaces with sparkling …


A Cheesy Pocket Techno Jam with Tiny Cheap Gear

Not just a little small and a little inexpensive. A lot little. Malaventura, aka Fernando Garcia Tamajon, sends this wonderful “cheesy pocket techno jam” (spotted via Instagram). The ingredients: a PO-14 from teenage engineering, a monotron Delay from Korg and a talking translator by an unknown brand bought in a fleamarketn Works for me. There’s something about things being small, self-contained, simple … that can be inspiring. For all those years of people derisively calling things “toys,” sometimes toys are exactly what we need. I love that mystery gear, too.


How TE’s $59 Drum Machine Sounds – And How The Pocket Operators Work

Teenage Engineering have also shared with us their video tutorials on the PO (Pocket Operator) line. The basic stuff to know (having been playing around with today rather than doing NAMM work): This being Nintendo-inspired, yes, there’s a metronome and alarm clock function. Select one of sixteen patterns, and one of sixteen sounds, with the respective buttons. Toggle between playing notes with the buttons, or inputing them with the step sequencer, using the “write” button. Hold “write,” and you can write parameters over top of playing sequences (effects work this way, too). That means you can automate patterns, etc. “bpm” …


Watch How Much Hardware You Can Jam With On a Budget

Who said electronic musical bliss required deep pockets? We’ve seen a steady flow of budget-minded gear over the last few years. What makes this equipment special isn’t just that it’s cheaper. It also has personality and produces distinctive sounds, loads of hands-on control, and fits compactly into carry-on luggage, meaning it’s a no-brainer on the road and in small live performance spaces. That’s encouraging more people to play live. MeeBlip owner Zachary Hollback sent over a video that sums up why this can be fun. This isn’t necessarily about inventing new kinds of music: it really is, in the mode …


Elektron and KORG volca Jam, and Quick Thoughts on Why We Love Hardware

We’re not so much in the habit of posting jams on CDM, but this one is especially nice – even through the freak-out visuals. And it comes from friends – Nigel Mullaney, with recording and engineering by Ian Boddy. Seen in the film: Elektron Analog4 keys Elektron Octatrak Elektron Machinedrum KORG volca series Look closely through that shaky video, and you might get some clue as to why people love hardware. There’s plenty of reason not to go the hardware route: computers alone still offer more power, more flexibility, and more sound for your buck. But have a look at …


Quick Jam: Digital Warrior, Open Source Step Sequencer, Plus KORG volca beats and Bitwig

Don’t call it a comeback. Hardware step sequencing is becoming the must-have accessory for even computer users. And the boutique Digital Warrior controller, which neatly combines knobs with colored pads, is a great solution. I’ve been messing about with the Arturia BeatStep, as well – review coming – but the Digital Warrior has some tricks of its own. It integrates nicely with Traktor, like the still-forthcoming MIDI Fighter Twist from DJ TechTools. But the reason I wouldn’t buy or recommend the DJTT piece is – no MIDI┬áDIN connector. And that spoils the fun. Here, the Digital Warrior is comfortable not …


One Awesome Jam, Four Sequences, 32-Steps: New MTRX Hardware Sequencer Video

Fyrd Instruments’ MTRX is a beautiful-looking, boutique hardware sequencer. But its one drawback had been the 8-step sequencer. Now, this should give you steps: think four simultaneous sequences, 32 steps, and the ability to output on the MIDI port and USB port simultaneously. Commenters frequently complain that technology for its own sake gets in the way of music. Well, that may be so, but here, the sequence sounds excellent. Our own MeeBlip (in the older SE version) joins some other great hardware and software: the Shruthi open source hardware, Native Instruments’ Monark, and Madrona Labs’ Aalto – three of my …