Java on the Mac is Oracle's Problem Now; OpenJDK the Path Forward

Finally, Mac Java support and development is no longer stuck in an Infinite Loop. Photo (CC-BY) Roger Schultz Parts of Java’s future may still look murky, but at least you can say this: it’s Oracle’s problem, not Apple’s. My previous rants: Opinion: Apple Has Killed Mac Java; OpenJDK Just Got Way More Important for Processing (executive summary: OpenJDK is the way forward) Java on the Mac is in Serious, Serious, Serious, Serious Trouble (executive summary: OpenJDK is the way forward, and Apple and/or Oracle have to get involved for it to work) Happily, Oracle and Apple have indeed gotten involved. …

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Java on the Mac is in Serious, Serious, Serious, Serious Trouble

Must-read: Chris Adamson, one of the few developers with real experience with Java and multimedia, lays out just how bad the situation is with Java on the Mac: shoes[1].drop(); I think the problems here are not insurmountable – it’s just a matter spending energy on the future of development in Java, not ranting at Steve Jobs – or simply moving on to other alternatives if they’re better-suited to your task anyway. Chris actually knows what he’s talking about, whereas I rant into the ether in the hopes that people who know what they’re talking about set me straight. But I …

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Opinion: Apple Has Killed Mac Java; OpenJDK Just Got Way More Important for Processing, More

Apple just killed their implementation of Java on the Mac – which just happens to be the only really usable implementation of Java on the Mac. There’s no other way to say it: Java developers on the Mac have relied on Apple’s implementation, and that implementation is not moving forward with Mac OS, period. I’m going to say what I think here, because it seems the message is important, and usually when I say what I think, if people feel what I think is wrong or incomplete, they tell me, and I learn something. (It’s the beauty of the Internet, …

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libpd: Put Pure Data in Your App, On an iPhone or Android, and Everywhere, Free

What if you could make any device or any software a re-programmable musical instrument, effect, or soundmaker? Your phone could be a touch-controlled effect, your tablet a sketchpad for interactive drum sequencers. Patches assembled on your desk on a computer could be taken with you in your pocket. And what if you could do all of this for free, using a time-tested environment? libpd, authored by Peter Brinkmann, takes on that vision. It’s a way of making Pure Data (Pd), the visual development tool for interactive music and media, more accessible across a range of applications and gadgets. It lets …

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Getting Started with Processing for Android

Photo (CC-BY) Kristian D.. Pick up a pen and draw a sketch. There, that was easy – however crude, you can get out an idea. Sketching with paper is still the fastest way for most of us to imagine something. But between that immediacy and the end result, you need prototypes. The Processing language has long been one of the easiest ways to sketch an idea in code – best after you’ve first put pen to paper, but as an immediate next step (and for ideas you just can’t draw). Built in Java, the creation of Ben Fry and Casey …

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Simple Xmp Modplayer for Android Brings Retro Back; Building an Android Tracker?

Those crazy Amiga artists were ahead of their time. The lightweight real-time music engines and formats they began were uncommonly efficient, and allowed the exchange of elaborate electronic music using a minimum of resources – with some accompanying compositional and sound design ingenuity required, as well. As a result, getting a phone handset to reproduce their work today is a pretty manageable task, and some of the music available is concise and clever. Pop on some headphones, load up some tunes, and you may feel you’re starring in your very own Amiga point and click adventure the next time you …

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Complete Live Set: Gorgeous Pen-Drawn Visuals and Sonics from Unsound

Unsound NYC, Alexander Kaline and Joshue Ott from superdraw on Vimeo. Audiovisual experiences promise to be richer than ever, but conveying them to new audiences matters, too. Very often, the Internet reduces documentation to small bits and pieces or low-fidelity, grainy live video that’s hard to follow. That’s why it’s a treat to have a full set from the excellent NYC Unsound Festival, here featuring the ongoing visual project by our friend Joshue Ott, superDraw. Built in Java and Processing, superDraw is a three-dimensional, stylus-driven generative drawing application, allowing expressive pen gestures to become a kind of visual performance to …

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Connect the Bots: Black Allegheny, An Entire Album Made by Algorithmic Swarms

Swarm Music Album Black Allegheny from Evan Merz on Vimeo. We’ve heard albums made by singular compositional minds and by bands. What would an album sound like if composed by swarm intelligence, by computer evolutionary models of individual agents or bots? That’s the question asked by composer Evan Merz in his new, full-length album “Black Allegheny.” (At top: the composer explains in a video.) Western musical and creative tradition is steeped in linearity, from the forward motion of the music staff to the mythos of Aristotle’s Poetics. So, maybe it’s little wonder that generative music – music that may not …

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Official Processing Wiki Goes Live, Full of Wisdom and Knowledge; How Best to Learn?

Demo on using Processing with Ruby, by Jason Cale. Photo (CC-BY-SA) valakirka. The Processing Wiki has just launched on the official Processing site: http://wiki.processing.org/w/Main_Page Via Casey Reas’ blog (which has more notes on the wiki) It’s a great place to start looking for information, particularly when it comes to FAQs, troubleshooting, and getting started developing. Some of the code snippets are, in my view, a bit dated; they’ve been ported from the Processing Hacks site started by Tom Carden and Karsten Schmidt, and I’m not certain that all represent current “best practices.” (For the OpenGL examples, I’d start out with …

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