Automatically Projection Mapping a 3D, Moving Object: White Kanga Show Stunning Tech

Hide’n’Seek – Technology Demo from White Kanga on Vimeo. Automatically map an object with a projector. Keep the mapping working as the object moves. And, oh yeah, look damned fine while doing it. That’s the neat trick Poland-based White Kanga have pulled off, powered by TouchDesigner. We’ve been following their work before: Robotic Mapping Pulls a Model Building, Tron-Like, Into the Virtual Projection Mapping, with Robotics, Goes Further to Augmenting Reality: MPS Demo [TouchDesigner] Here, we get to really see it in action. It doesn’t hurt that you get cool graphics visualizing the calibration. It’s an internal tool, but it …

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Mechanical Motion: Drawing with Turntables, Phasing with Film Projectors

Speaking of mechanical motion and machine drawing, in the work of Robert Howsare, vintage equipment becomes part kinetic sculpture, part machine artist. In “Drawing Apparatus,” two turntables become a generative geometric drawing machine, Spirograph-style. (See some really lovely-looking renders by this machine on the artwork project page. Via Today and Tomorrow, hat tip to portable.tv and Cool Hunting.) The revolution of the records create drawings that serve as a markers of temporality. The drawings also speak to the idea of the editionable print through their ability to be replicated using domestic materials. IV Phases is a hypnotic work involving phasing …

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“Machine Drawing Drawing Machines” Art Classics by CNC, and Other Pablo Garcia Wonders

What happens when an Albrecht Dürer masterpiece meets CNC? Watch the video above to see. The work of Pittsburgh-based Pablo Garcia, who does collaborative, trans-media work and teaches at Carnegie Mellon, the project nods both to art history and the world of robotics – and it’s just one of Garcia’s works to do so.

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"Machine Drawing Drawing Machines" Art Classics by CNC, and Other Pablo Garcia Wonders

What happens when an Albrecht Dürer masterpiece meets CNC? Watch the video above to see. The work of Pittsburgh-based Pablo Garcia, who does collaborative, trans-media work and teaches at Carnegie Mellon, the project nods both to art history and the world of robotics – and it’s just one of Garcia’s works to do so.

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whacamole

PocoPoco, Kinetic Music Control Gone Whac-a-Mole, and Our Tactile Future

PocoPoco is a delightful, fanciful device that takes music control into the realm of kinetic sculpture. Normally, the relationship of music controller is primarily about the operator making physical actions. With PocoPoco, the hardware itself moves. The essential musical structure is familiar: it’s the grid of light-up buttons, with strong similarity to the ongoing interaction design of Toshio Iwai in the 90s and (Tenori-On) past decade. Even aesthetically, there are similarities – perhaps not coincidentally as this team is also Japan-based. But adding in the element of solenoid-powered cylinders popping out of the grid adds a major element of surprise. …

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A Kinetic Sonic Organ Sculpture, Made with Cans

In the latest example of kinetic, sound-producing sculpture, an Arduino-controlled organ of moving cans makes eerie, beautiful descending noises. Jakub Koźniewski, a member of the panGenerator collective, sends in details of that group’s work, sponsored in this case by the stuff in the cans: Kinetic audiovisual installation for burn displayed during burn Selector Festival 2011 Movement of the cans is controlled by 9 independent servos connected to the Arduino board while the sound is purely analogue – air pumped by 9 ordinary mattress pumps blows into the “whistles” at the top of plexiglass pipes. Tone is modulated by the current …

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As a Wooden Tangible Sequencer Plays Bach, Meditations on Encoding Music

You may have seen it already as it makes its viral rounds, but an advertising video for Japanese mobile giant NTT Docomo is a poetic model of how musical events are encoded, whether through means tangible or digital. A track of pitches makes a wooden ball into a mallet, traversing a track as it is driven by gravity. The keys of that track become a xylophone, the traversal of space sequencing notes in time, and you hear Bach Cantata 147, “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.” While there’s a clever take on a trill, the only disappointment is that we don’t …

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Rainlith: A Robotic, Responsive Rainstick, Powered by Kinect

In a responsive, real-time sculpture, the simple sonic qualities of a rainstick become electronically enhanced. Rainlith, a “kinetic sound art” work by Rui Gato, makes the rainstick itself robotic, its sounds transformed in space in a way that is itself sculptural. Responding to movement in the space using Microsoft’s Kinect, the apparatus is a geektastic brew of just about every tool you could imagine involved in this sort of construction. The artist shares full details, reproduced here in both English and Portugese – and Rui, thanks for sending this in:

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Exquisite Sonic Sculptures, Made with Motors and Cardboard

Granular synthesis, as described by Iannis Xenakis, imagined sound as constructed from elementary elements. In the work of Zimoun, elementary sonic grains are physical. An undulating wall of cardboard rubs surfaces against one another to form a chorus of sound. Cotton balls roll against boxes in throaty clouds of sound. Wires wriggle like some sort of insect antennae. Below, the newest video of his work, in which cardboard petals form an animated wall of rustling noise. The results, powered by simple DC motors in kinetic musical action, recall some kind of natural, organic colony. Assembled in structures sculptural and architectural, …

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Fermid: A Light That Breathes, A Kinetic Sculpture Like an Organism

Fermid, by Behnaz Babazadeh, is a beautiful kinetic sculpture that acts like a breathing organism – or perhaps a colony of parametric creatures. As the artist describes it: Fermid is a kinetic sculpture that uses technology and parametric design principles to explore the natural movement that can be found in living organisms. Special Thanks to Alvaro Soto. Spring 2011 Major Studio Final | Parsons New School for Design Via Alex Koblin (also of Moodgadget / ISO50). It’s simple, in a way, but terrifically elegant – and any mention of this kind of media on this blog is a reminder that …

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