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Music That’s All Human Body and Objects, No Instruments: Biotronica with Ain TheMachine [Interview]

Music is all around us, yadda, yadda – we hear these aphorisms all the time, but to most, making music is still about the classical idea of instruments. Not so for this Madrid-based artist, who has transformed his body and all the objects around him into an instrument. The results are mad and magical – and CDM’s Matt Earp talked to the artist to find out just how he put this all together, and what it has to do with music like flamenco. There’s a noisy, lively spot for co-working in Neukölln, Berlin called Agora – a space full of …

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Yamaha DX100 Synths Used to Make Thunderstorms Happen Inside Your Motorcycle Helmet

Music tech videos need to be made like this again. (via dylan digits in comments) You don’t need a private Ibiza pool party and some slow-motion to make you look cooler when your keytar makes lightning strike in your face. Until then, we’re down-voting that s***. Consider yourself on notice. The Honda scooter ad at the end just sort of fits in, because how else are you carrying your DX100? Not in a station wagon. Not on the subway. You’ve got FM to make anything possible and you’re already wearing a motorcycle helmet and leather. You can ride with your …

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littleBits Adds “User-Generated” Hardware, Launches Store with Oscilloscope, Bleep Drum

littleBits, the snap-together magnetic hardware module system for easy DIY hardware mash-ups, has a unique take on how to add new hardware. Previously, modules came from littleBits; the popular Synth Kit collaboration with KORG being a significant exception. littleBits has certainly offered a lot of options, including the recent Cloud Kit for adding Internet connectivity. But now, it’s opening up hardware development to anyone with an idea. While littleBits calls itself “open source hardware” – founder Ayah Bdeir even co-founding the Open Hardware Summit — that openness has always been restricted when it comes to the magnetic connectors. Those are …

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KORG and Yamaha Will Probably Eventually Replace All Of Us With Robot Avatars

But, on the upside, we’ll be huge in Japan. Yes, just to be clear, this is Hatsune Miku, who is actually a software vocal algorithm, not an actual singer, playing live in front of throngs of fans. Enjoy that stomp box while you can. It may… kill you in your sleep, strangling you with your own guitar cables, and then go on the road with your volcas and electribes in your place. Don’t even think of letting it talk to Siri. (Seriously, KORG, did you ask Yamaha if they’re including the Three Laws of Robotics on that chipset, or should …

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WTF? KORG Miku Stomp Box Sings Along With You, Vocaloid Style

You’re not hallucinating. This is a stomp box that adds a Japanese robot woman singing along as you play. If you’ve heard the now-popular Vocaloid effect, this is that, in a stompbox. Just how Japanese is this product? Let us count the ways. First, let’s just quote the product text: Hatsune Miku sings when you play your guitar! A design that fuses the worlds of Hatsune Miku and guitar effects. Nearly unlimited possibilities; 11 lyric patterns are provided. Lyrics for “Senbonzakura” (a Japanese song) are preset. An iPhone app for entering lyrics is available, so you can make MIKU STOMP …

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KORG Gadget for iPad Gets Serious, with MIDI, New Slicer-Samplers, and Ableton Export

Ableton alone can’t take you mobile, apart from bringing your MacBook running Live on the bus. But now KORG is ready to take your Ableton Live work on the road. Apart from adding native Live set export to their electribe and electribe sampler, the new versions of KORG’s iOS apps Gadget and iKaossilator do export, too. And that’s just one feature in the deceptively-named “1.03” release of KORG’s Gadget. Gadget is one of those apps that I’ve had to file under “wow, this looks cool but I’ve no time.” As the name implies, you get a selection of synths and …

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New KORG electribe Focuses on Live Performance – and Export to Ableton Live

Few pieces of music hardware ever have had the impact that KORG’s electribe series has. And there was a time when playing live almost equated to showing up with this gear. Today, KORG has a genuinely new generation of that hardware, long awaited by fans. The engines under the hood are new, finally taking the tech we’ve seen on various KORG gadgets and building it into the flagship production gizmos. They allow for more live performance scenarios. And in a first, you can use an electribe to build patterns for Ableton Live, creating on-the-go or onstage patterns you can bring …

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KORG’s Latest volca sample Sequences Sounds – But You Need an iOS App to Add Your Own Sounds

The KORG volca sample is a fun-looking sample “sequencer” – it can play back, modify, and mangle pre-recorded samples in a step sequencer. But it requires a dedicated iOS app to do the actual sampling. That makes for a mixed bag, straight out of the gate. As KORG says: “The new volca lets you recapture the excitement of the first generation of samplers, in which any sound — vocals, spoken words, ambient sound, or glitches — becomes material for your creations!” — right, but then it leaves out one of the best things about those hardware samplers, namely – sampling. …

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Watch KORG’s littleBits Transformed into Badass Keytar

Right in the manual, KORG suggests that you might turn their magnetic modular system, the littleBits Synth Kit, into a keytar. But this is a sort of “attach all the modules to a bit of wood” affair. Meanwhile, in Japan… Pantograph is an art/design agency and animation house (site link – Japanese only). And when they got their hands on the Synth Kit, they did it up properly. Think beautiful, multi-colored cases, proper playable ergonomics – and a blinking light-up KORG logo. The results are enchanting: If you want one of your own and you’re passing through Tokyo (superfans, buy …

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A New Lab Opens Music Making to People with Learning Disabilities

Let’s face it: the initial audience for the first version of music tech is often the developers. That impulse to build something for yourself is a perfectly reasonable one. But music technology is constantly producing new ways of creating music, and that means it has to learn quickly. Unlike, say, a guitar, it can’t build on centuries of experience. And if the industry and music technology community are to consider how to reach more people, why not go beyond just average markets? Why not open up music making to people who have been left out? If music making is an …

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