unrender: Finding Space Between Gallery and Club [Videos]

There is a well-known divide between visuals as they exist in experimental media and live performance and media in the art world. Transitory electronic media fails to fit the traditional mold of value. Digital media is too ephemeral, too temporary. Light on walls can’t be collected; improvised visual performance is something that fades away. With unrender, we want to embrace just those gaps between worlds, walking along the fractures. We are looking to find the expressive potential of electronic audiovisual media as distinct from what came before. And most importantly, we want to make sure there’s space for all these …

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Simulacra, a Video Installation Revealed Through Magnifying Glasses

It’s easy to forget that all video is illusion, a matter of perspective. In 2013’s Simulacra, Germany-based artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski, images seem to merge directly from light in the eyes of the viewer, pulled from space into being by magnifying glasses suspended from the ceiling. Even an element as basic as focus, then, is game for artistic manipulation. Her materials are basic – think monitors and a splitter. But in this as in her other works, physical materiality is a common theme, playing with mapping and light, but also toying with space and objects. It’s interesting in this case that …

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Mapping Berlin's Project Spaces Against Transformation, Rebuilding Old Rockets in 3D

Through political change, people keep making art – whether overtly political or not, finding some home in the landscapes that shift around them. We now find ourselves able to map the work and ideas of artists across space and time, to a greater extent than ever before. Amidst international obsession on Berlin, for instance, it’s worth seeing a quantifiable picture of change. A project from Severine Marguin maps just how many of those project spaces for performance and art have appeared, vanished, and been replaced over the past decades, before and after reunification. You’ll find a proliferation of spaces that …

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Mapping Berlin’s Project Spaces Against Transformation, Rebuilding Old Rockets in 3D

Through political change, people keep making art – whether overtly political or not, finding some home in the landscapes that shift around them. We now find ourselves able to map the work and ideas of artists across space and time, to a greater extent than ever before. Amidst international obsession on Berlin, for instance, it’s worth seeing a quantifiable picture of change. A project from Severine Marguin maps just how many of those project spaces for performance and art have appeared, vanished, and been replaced over the past decades, before and after reunification. You’ll find a proliferation of spaces that …

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A Delicate Web in White Lasers: Robert Henke's 'Fragile Territories'

Mastery of technology need not be an end in itself, a showcase for mechanical sophistication. It can mean finding the point at which you push a medium to be its most expressive. And I suppose that’s why so many can admire the ongoing work of musician and media artist Robert Henke. The lasers in ‘Fragile Territories’ are not the crude, awkward beams you probably know from kitschy planetarium shows. Instead, they form a spidery lace so exquisite, you could imagine them as being part of something crackling with organic life – or the workings of a fanciful undersea electro-luminescent metropolis. …

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A Delicate Web in White Lasers: Robert Henke’s ‘Fragile Territories’

Mastery of technology need not be an end in itself, a showcase for mechanical sophistication. It can mean finding the point at which you push a medium to be its most expressive. And I suppose that’s why so many can admire the ongoing work of musician and media artist Robert Henke. The lasers in ‘Fragile Territories’ are not the crude, awkward beams you probably know from kitschy planetarium shows. Instead, they form a spidery lace so exquisite, you could imagine them as being part of something crackling with organic life – or the workings of a fanciful undersea electro-luminescent metropolis. …

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I Want My IR TV: A Giant Screen Made of 625 Remote Controls

From the avalanche of discarded, used electronics, artists are beginning to make new works. DeFunct/ReFunct, as covered here in some detail recently, appeared last week at Berlin’s Transmediale. But for a uniquely-elegant transformation of the old into the new, Chris Shen shares his TV screen made of some 625 remote controls, as installed in an East London gallery. It can’t be seen with the naked eye, but through any IR-sensitive lens, the screen comes alive. It’s television for other electronics, then, the remote controls putting on an infrared show for an audience of sensors. Chris sends CDM this description: 625 …

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Watch Artists Talk About Making Sound From Matter; Thursday Event and Stream in Transmediale Prelude

Alex Nowitz for BodyControlled #2 from CDM on Vimeo. Electronic media artist Mario de Vega (Mexico City/Berlin) says his work plays with the creation of “unstable systems.” As part of the official Vorspiel, or lead-up, to Berlin’s massive Transmediale festival, here we get to visit two artists working with the materiality of live performance, drawing from the festival theme of “in/compatible.” The sonic environments they create seem poised on the brink of sonic chaos, a dance at the edge of entropy. CDM will again be editorial co-presenter of BodyControlled; you can see the show for free (donation suggested) in Berlin …

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Föhnseher Scoops Images from Wireless to Analog TV; in Berlin Saturday, More Julian Oliver

Julian Oliver’s “Föhnseher” spies on images on a wifi network, then “broadcasts” them to that older, less “pull”-based medium, the analog television. Have a look at the demonstration, as made by fellow media artist Servando Barreiro. Föhnseher rises from the scrap heap of analog TV. Unlike other televisions, Föhnseher captures and displays images downloaded by people on surrounding local wireless networks. Other people’s phones, laptops and tablet computers all become broadcast stations for this device, replacing the forgotten television towers of old. The name föhnseher derives from fernseher, the German word for television, and the föhn, a strange warm wind …

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