Bluetooth LE Will Make Minority Report a Creepy Reality, But Also Arduino Cooler

PSFK – Adaptive storefront prototype from + rehabstudio on Vimeo. After years of failing to demonstrate compelling applications, Bluetooth is back with a vengeance. If you haven’t yet used a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) device, it’s a completely different experience. Pairing and range and latency work better (the result of years of learning how to make these better). Battery drain is barely noticeable. You can expect BLE to power lots of clever new applications – and it’s nice to see it showing up on DIY electronics. Oh, yeah, and it can creep the hell out of you, privacy-wise, by making …

READ MORE →
Cubase iC Air, erm... artists' rendering. Just about got that mix right. (Hold on - red ball. This track is not going to be premeditated.)

Cubase Goes Futuristic: Motion Hand Gestures Control Music in Free Add-on [Details]

When it comes to big, flagship audio tools, you don’t get a whole lot of sci-fi in your software. That makes Steinberg’s announcements this week more of a change of pace. They aren’t the first to talk about virtual studio sessions, or even gesturally-controlled music. But seeing this as an add-on to Cubase, not just an experimental hack, counts as news. And Cubase users can add on those futuristic capabilities in the form of two new tools. You can fly through Cubase sessions with gestural controls using depth cameras (on Windows) or LEAP Motion (on Windows and Mac). And you …

READ MORE →

Minority Report Meets GarageBand: Airborne Beats is Hand-Controlled Music Making

From the Lab: Airborne Beats from Oblong Industries on Vimeo. With hand gestures recalling those that first reached the mainstream in Minority Report, “Airborne Beats” lets you make music just by gesturing with your hands and fingers in mid-air. You can drag around audio samples, and make gestures for control, controlling both production and performance. Coming from the labs at Oblong, it’s the latest etude in a long series of these kind of interfaces (see below). They in turn point out this could work with any time-based interface. And because of the nature of the interface, it also makes those …

READ MORE →

An Abstract Visual Interface, Made of Light and Gestures, and Full-Body Virtual Exercise

Computer vision technologies for manipulating digital interfaces with gestures are already here and mature; now it’s simply a matter of designing creative applications around them. And as with many design tasks, presentation is everything. From comments, Jeremy Bailey sends along an example of a gestural interface in which elements are moved around with gestures. The project was constructed for the Squeaky Wheel Media Arts Center in Buffalo. The good news: the visuals are exquisite, as abstract patterns of colored light dance around the screen. The bad news: light-skinned folks will have to wear blackface and white gloves. Now, that would …

READ MORE →

Minority Report Interface, Implemented in Flash + FLARToolkit, and Why it Rocks

ActionScript programmer Peter Kaptein has done some brilliantly creative work to mimic the infamous gestural interface in the film Minority Report using only Flash, a webcam, a printer, and your fingers. (Okay, you may want to pick up some Scotch tape, too.) The tricks to make it all work (as I see it, anyway): 1. Treat distance as “pressure” for gestures. 2. Use two markers, allowing for multi-finger manipulation of the interface. 3. Create combined actions – and provide lots of visual feedback. 4. Don’t work as much with transformations perpendicular to the screen – by avoiding some of the …

READ MORE →

Strap on Gloves, Play Two-Handed Spatial Theremin

Based on work with the Oblong g-speak “spatial operating environment” gestural system – research that inspired the film Minority Report – our friend Trey Harrison has been doing some wonderful work with new Theremin-style interfaces. He writes: I have been working with Oblong Industries (http://oblong.com) and took some of my spare time to combine their technology with my Salvation project (http://slvtn.com) and build a theremin-like instrument. There are three degrees of control: Pitch is adjusted by moving hands left and right. Volume is adjusted by moving hands up and down. Vibrato is adjusted by moving hands foward and backward. Many …

READ MORE →