IMG_20141017_134128678

Here’s How Clever Hacks Turned Sushi Into a Music Sequencer, with Just Blaze and Tokimonsta

If you’ve ever ordered sushi from one of those rotating belts, you’ll love this musical hack that takes it to an entirely new place. For Red Bull Music Academy (RBMA) Tokyo, Native Instruments engineers teamed up with Just Blaze and Tokimonsta to turn a sushi restaurant into a live electronic remix instrument. And these aren’t tricks – slick as the music video at top my appear. They really did use a combination of cameras and software to make colored plates into a working interface for music. RBMA produced a video that shows some of what’s going on behind the scenes, …

READ MORE →

A Giant LEGO Construction Makes Music with Maschine, Made by NI’s Devs

LEGOs and rapid, hacked construction have led to the development of hardware sold to musicians; Push and Maschine each saw hacked-together versions as prototypes before the more-polished versions we see today. So, why not use some of those toys and hacks to make something you can actually use, right now? Apparently what happens when you let the Native Instruments development team free to play for a weekend, that’s exactly what happens. LEGO Techno uses computer vision to allow the musician to make sequences with LEGO blocks. It’s not the first time we’ve seen this very idea – seems musicians gazing …

READ MORE →

See Like a Bug on Acid: Visual Smash Ups, From Cameras, Simpsons + Family Guy, YouTube

Visual Smash Up from Parag K Mital on Vimeo. What happens when you distort a video with a video? It’s what artist and coder Parag K Mital calls a “visual smash up,” which he says “takes existing content and mashes it up to create new content.” Huh? Well, have a look above for an example with a live video feed – or below, combining Simpsons and Family Guy in unholy animated sitcom matrimony. But here, Parag explains what he’s doing to CDM:

READ MORE →

Visual Music: SketchSynth Lets You Draw an Interface with Marker and Paper, A Brief Drawn-Music History

Today, I’m in London doing a hands-on workshop on visual metaphors for music, and covering various topics filed under “synesthesia” at Music Tech Fest. It seems appropriate, with the subject matter on the brain, to revisit the topic of visuals and music in a series of posts. When you make hardware, with knobs and faders, you’re constrained by physical space – the amount of room on a circuit board, the radius of a knob cap, the size of your fingers. But before you get there, the first step is to sketch an idea. Imagine if you could do that with …

READ MORE →

Interview: Anton Marini on Visual Expression, Exploring Glitch, Open Community

Ed.: He’s worked to translate classic hardware like the landmark Rutt-Etra to digital media – in that case, working with its original co-creator. He’s been a virtuoso of Mac visual development, building his own tools and working out an innovative way of piping live textures between applications in ways never before possible. And he’s been an important member of the visual community and accomplished live performer, including on occasion being nice enough to write for us here on CDM. Anton Marini talks to another luminary of our community, Kyle McDonald, about … well, just about everything you could think of …

READ MORE →

Sol Installation Probes Solar Energy, Uses Rapid Processing Prototyping

Sol, an interactive “spatial” installation, examines the roots of solar energy. (Your sun: the greatest nuclear fusion power source within light years.) Visitors to the installation get to participate in “staging” the whole cycle, playing with particles that simulate nuclear fusion, then watching the response of DMX-controlled LED and fluorescent lighting, all set to an ambient soundscape. The project is the work of small design shop TheProduct*, commissioned by Humboldt University Berlin. We saw TheProduct*’s terrific musical multi-touch table way back in 2007 on Create Digital Music. The show was curated by Neues Universum e.V, partering with neo.studio neumann schneider …

READ MORE →

Unlogo Uses Computer Vision to Erase Logos from Your World

Unlogo Intro from Jeff Crouse on Vimeo. As the Internets work themselves into a kerfuffle over Gap’s laughably bad logo redesign, here’s a different tack: eliminate logos from your world. Developed by Jeff Crouse, Unlogo is an entirely open-source project that draws on Intel’s incredible computer vision library, OpenCV, to train computers to see logos. It then replaces logos with other images, censoring the branding in your world. kickstarter.com/​projects/​816924031/​unlogo-the-corporate-identity-media-filter jeffcrouse.info/​projects/​unlogo/​ unlogo.org/​ code.google.com/​p/​unlogo/​ groups.google.com/​group/​unlogo Aside from giving users digital control over the presence of branding in their environment, the project is an interesting study in brand recognition, imbuing the computer with …

READ MORE →

Augmented Projection with Magician Marco Tempest, Big in Japan

Magic Projection Live @ TEDxTokyo 2010 from Marco Tempest on Vimeo. Applying infrared tracking to a projection surface, Magic Projection makes digital visuals more immersive by freeing the content from fixed real-world imagery. We saw the project at the end of last year, but technologist and magician Marco Tempest tells us he’s just completed the first live performance debut of the system. The project is built in OpenFrameworks, with the assistance of that project’s founder Zach Lieberman. Here is the first ever live performance with my Magic Projection system (at TEDxTokyo 2010). Have fun watching and let me know what …

READ MORE →

A Plotter Draws Pictures of Guests, Through the Magic of Computer Vision

Old technology can take on new meaning, once injected with the intelligence of today’s software. And so it is that the plotter – the specialist printing gear invented in a decade past – is being given a new lease on life. With computer vision software, the free and open source OpenCV library, and the free, rapid-development code toolkit for artists OpenFrameworks, a computer can “see” guests and “draw” them on the plotter. There’s something compelling about the kinetic quality of plotters, mechanically etching away before your very eyes. (OpenCV is also accessible via other toolkits, too, like Processing, if you …

READ MORE →

Computer Vision Goodness: OpenCV 2.0, OpenCV on Android, Book

OpenCV powers a multitouch interface, built in openFrameworks. Project by / photo (CC) Todd Vanderlin. When Thanksgiving rolls around, OpenCV will be one of the gifts for which I’ll be thankful. OpenCV is a “computer vision” library, capable of tracking motion and analyzing images, but generally useful as a pixel-crunching video library for many tasks. It’s a native, C/C++ library, accessible from many other languages, including Java and Python. Experienced C++ programmers and artists dabbling in Processing alike can use it. (See our Processing tutorial.) It’s also a real success story for open source code, first developed by Intel but …

READ MORE →