Erasure playing live onstage on the Mac.  (CC-BY-SA) Andrew Hurley.

Apple’s relationship with pro music needs some mending

What happens when a key relationship in music technology turns a bit sour? There’s no mistaking the music world’s preference for Apple products. But there are some specific causes for concern in the way Apple is handling its desktop operating system and its relationship with pro musicians. First, let me be clear. I’ve covered Apple and music for a long time. I’ve met some of the people handling these products; some of them I’ve known fairly well in a professional capacity. I have tremendous respect for the company, its products, and its management. I’ve been a regular contributor to Macworld …

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Connecting Your iOS Apps: Why Both Audiobus and JACK Can Succeed

It always has to be complicated, doesn’t it? You just want to sit on your couch with your iPhone or iPad and finish some music, by recording that drum machine and a bass line into a multitrack song in a different app. And then, after months of this site saying the way to do that was something called Audiobus, everyone is suddenly talking about something called JACK, too. Ah, standards. All of this had some wondering if JACK even has a shot, with Audiobus already out there. Even Apple has come onboard, as of last week, with the announcement that …

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Microsoft and the WebGL “Threat”: WebGL’s Future, Even on IE, May Still Be Bright

All this power, all this technology, and … yup, we’re making another aquarium. Works for me. As part of WebGL’s ongoing growing pains, Web engineers have gotten into a war of words that finds even some Microsoft engineers squaring off against other Microsoft engineers. Look closely, though, and you’ll see some real progress on making WebGL a wider reality – and, behind the headlines, promise we may still see it in Microsoft’s flagship browser. In a recent, widely-disseminated post, Microsoft’s security engineering blog recently called WebGL “harmful.” The post didn’t mince words, referring to two reports by Context Information Security, …

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Microsoft and the WebGL "Threat": WebGL's Future, Even on IE, May Still Be Bright

All this power, all this technology, and … yup, we’re making another aquarium. Works for me. As part of WebGL’s ongoing growing pains, Web engineers have gotten into a war of words that finds even some Microsoft engineers squaring off against other Microsoft engineers. Look closely, though, and you’ll see some real progress on making WebGL a wider reality – and, behind the headlines, promise we may still see it in Microsoft’s flagship browser. In a recent, widely-disseminated post, Microsoft’s security engineering blog recently called WebGL “harmful.” The post didn’t mince words, referring to two reports by Context Information Security, …

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Official Kinect SDK Coming This Spring for Research, on Windows; What Might it Mean?

I’m Superman! Uh… yeah, so there is some appeal to gestural interfaces for 3D navigation, I meant to say. Photo (CC-BY-SA) Open Exhibits; see note below. The absence of an official SDK has hardly discouraged experimentation and innovation with Microsoft’s depth-sensing camera for the Xbox 360. But Microsoft, via their research and strategy officer Craig Mundie, announced today that it would make a non-commercial, research SDK available this spring for Windows, with a commercial version to follow later. Microsoft acknowledges that the research and experimentation communities are already all over their technology, describing “an already vibrant ecosystem of enthusiasts.” So, …

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Opinion: Apple Has Killed Mac Java; OpenJDK Just Got Way More Important for Processing, More

Apple just killed their implementation of Java on the Mac – which just happens to be the only really usable implementation of Java on the Mac. There’s no other way to say it: Java developers on the Mac have relied on Apple’s implementation, and that implementation is not moving forward with Mac OS, period. I’m going to say what I think here, because it seems the message is important, and usually when I say what I think, if people feel what I think is wrong or incomplete, they tell me, and I learn something. (It’s the beauty of the Internet, …

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Your Input Needed: Visualist Platform Survey 2010

“Why don’t you cover more…” “Why are you biased toward…” Vocal, or perhaps a silent minority or majority, readers have platforms they choose that matter to their art. In parallel with the sonically-inclined survey launched earlier today on Create Digital Music, we want to know what platforms you use and care about seeing covered on Create Digital Motion, especially as we plan expanded coverage for the coming months. Dumped the PC for an iPad? Running all your live shows on an Amiga? A PlayStation 2? Whatever your choice, we want to hear about it. Note that this isn’t a popularity …

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For the Record: Mobile Platforms, Music, and Partisanship

This is a New York City-produced set of haikus, so it’s accompanied by Brooklyn cherry blossoms. Photo (CC-BY-SA) TaĆ­s Melillo. It occurs to me that I tend to write long articles, and people don’t always read them closely. And sometimes I do indeed obscure my own ideas, so I’ll make this as clear as possible. James Lewin on Synthtopia responds to criticism of the iPhone, and differentiates his angle from my own. It’s well worth reading, and clarifies his thoughts, but there still seems to be some confusion about where I stand. I can spell it out. I’m really not …

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Ethereal Dialpad Touch App, Development Experience on Android and Beyond

Google’s Android has been a relatively slow starter for mobile music software, but a gem like Adam Smith’s free Ethereal Dialpad proves it’s a viable option, and the app is an inspiring musical toy, to boot. Perhaps more important than that, behind the scenes, Adam is employing a really beautifully audio engine of his own design with an elegant approach to coding sound. Ethereal Dialpad features a set of basic modules for using touch to produce synthesized sound with real-time effects. The concept isn’t new – Adam says he was inspired by the pitch mapping on KORG’s Kaossilator – but …

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Jim Reekes, The Man Behind Mac Sound

OMT in San Francisco #3: ‘Let it beep’ from One More Thing on Vimeo. The legend of the early sounds of the Mac remains, apparently, an alluring one. Here, Jim Reekes talks to a Dutch documentary crew (though in English) about his thought process in designing sounds for the Mac, including the famous Mac startup sound. If you haven’t heard the story, it’s a great tale. But there’s more to why Jim Reekes matters. For one, his insight into how sound design impacts the way people feel about a product is telling. Years later, following an onslaught of still more …

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