Here’s a Track Made From Just Teenage Engineering PO-12 and MeeBlip, And Another with MeeBlip Vocals

Not just less is more. More from less. Call it the sub-$200 studio. Our friend Tomash Ghz has made a track with sounds produced using only the Teenage Engineering PO-12 and the MeeBlip anode. Listen: And, very cool, have a go at the project files via Splice:—teslacoil For the record, that’s US$59 for the Teenage drum machine, and US$139.95 list for the MeeBlip. (In fact, MeeBlip is on sale now for a very limited time for US$119.95 with free US/Canadian shipping or discounted international shipping.)


Teenage Engineering Wants You to Make Your Own Pocket Case

First, they made dirt-cheap synths and drum machines. Then, they made housings that turn them into handheld calculators. Now, they want … you to rethink the case entirely. Say what? So, the bad news is, Teenage Engineering’s cool calculator-style cases for their amazing-sounding, crazy-cheap synths and drum machine are backordered. And that is too bad. Because, damnit, even I can’t get one. And they’re really cool – I had a look at the cases at Musikmesse, and they recall nothing if not a Braun-style dress-up suit for these wonderful (and useful) sonic toys. But this being Teenage Engineering, they’ve found …


Teenage Engineering Drum Machine, Hacked with Big Buttons

You’re going to need some bigger pockets. (Overalls?) British-born, Kyoto-based Ally Mobbs has hacked the inexpensive Teenage Engineering PO-12 drum machine into a full-sized box. Instead of the tiny, fingertip-challenging buttons, you get nice, big arcade buttons. He’s also made a lovely-looking wooden case and a jack connector.


KORG SQ-1 Sequencer Does Everything: CV, MIDI, littleBits, USB [Details]

Analog or digital, clock or notes, it appears Korg’s new SQ-1 will do anything. It loves your MS-20, but also your volca series and your monotribe and your MIDI gear and your computer. In fact, with audio clock, it’ll support a product even Korg probably only heard about yesterday – those cute Teenage Engineering machines. The SQ-1 is the new compact step sequencer hardware from Korg. Way back when Korg first unveiled the MS-20 mini, I hoped for a remake of the SQ-10 to go with it. Now, instead of that lumbering behemoth, we got something much more practical. The …


How TE’s $59 Drum Machine Sounds – And How The Pocket Operators Work

Teenage Engineering have also shared with us their video tutorials on the PO (Pocket Operator) line. The basic stuff to know (having been playing around with today rather than doing NAMM work): This being Nintendo-inspired, yes, there’s a metronome and alarm clock function. Select one of sixteen patterns, and one of sixteen sounds, with the respective buttons. Toggle between playing notes with the buttons, or inputing them with the step sequencer, using the “write” button. Hold “write,” and you can write parameters over top of playing sequences (effects work this way, too). That means you can automate patterns, etc. “bpm” …


Nintendo Game & Watch Inspires Tiny, $59 Synths from Teenage Engineering [CDM Hands-on]

“Pocket” is a term often used loosely to mean anything small. Not so the Teenage Engineering PO-12 series of instruments. They’re each literally small enough that you could put them in your jeans comfortably and still cram in your phone. We’ve got units from TE (and collaborator Cheap Monday) here at CDM, so let’s talk about what our wacky Stockholm friends have done this time. Remember Nintendo’s Game & Watch series? These business card-sized pocket games used crude but charming LCD animations, characters making jerky, repetitive movements for basic games. The ultra-cheap toy titles preceded the NES, the ingenious work …


Teenage Engineering’s Tiny, $50 Drum Machine, Revealed in Videos

It’s called the PO-12. It’s $50. It’s absolutely tiny – a little stand props it up, inspired by the Nintendo Game & Watch. And it’s already sounding like a drum machine. The drum machine first revealed to the world at a panel I moderated at Moogfest is finally, after manufacturing and customs delays, making its way to a select group of first owners – mainly VIPs and artists from that festival. What you’re seeing here is just a prototype; Teenage Engineering now says they’ll have a fully fleshed-out version some time in 2015. There are two things, apart from the …