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Interview: Anika, Working with Portishead’s Geoff Barrow, Makes an Album You Don’t Have to Like

Perhaps it’s something of an irony, here on a site that heralds shiny technology, but there is a longing among many musicians to return to something raw and unvarnished in music. There’s discontentment in the ranks of the techno-futurists, enough to sow the seeds of rebellions. If that feeling could be given a voice, Anika would be a good candidate. A political journalist who found herself, entirely unexpected, at a session with Portishead producer Geoff Barrow, she is a vinyl-loving, politically-minded throwback, an antidote to everything that commercially-calibrated in music. http://www.stonesthrow.com/anika The first thing you should know about Anika’s self-titled …

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Music Made with Bees, Free Sample Set, and Why You Should Care

I’m late in posting this, but it’s too good to pass up – our friend Troels Folmann sends us his latest sound design experiment, this time with bees. Better audio: Bees by Tonehammer Specs: 200-230 wing flaps per second (hence the tone) Top speed: 15 mph. Compound eyes with thousands of tiny lenses plus simple eyes. A life form with 20,000 known species, on which human life depends Availability: with our protection, a long, long time. Without, we’re toast. There’s also a free bee sample set for use with Kontakt or (via WAV) any other tool. [Download link, .rar ] …

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Unlogo Uses Computer Vision to Erase Logos from Your World

Unlogo Intro from Jeff Crouse on Vimeo. As the Internets work themselves into a kerfuffle over Gap’s laughably bad logo redesign, here’s a different tack: eliminate logos from your world. Developed by Jeff Crouse, Unlogo is an entirely open-source project that draws on Intel’s incredible computer vision library, OpenCV, to train computers to see logos. It then replaces logos with other images, censoring the branding in your world. kickstarter.com/​projects/​816924031/​unlogo-the-corporate-identity-media-filter jeffcrouse.info/​projects/​unlogo/​ unlogo.org/​ code.google.com/​p/​unlogo/​ groups.google.com/​group/​unlogo Aside from giving users digital control over the presence of branding in their environment, the project is an interesting study in brand recognition, imbuing the computer with …

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Sonification: Thermonuclear Testing, Made into Music, 1945-1998

Visualization often wins out over sonification when it comes to making data clear. But sound has one key advantage: it can make time and scale apparent, by tapping directly into our perception of forward time. Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto, born well into the Nuclear Age in 1959, uses that property to chilling effect. The sounds in “1945-1998” are made still more unsettling in their rendering as tranquil, musical sounds rather than explosions. Quietly, World War III is waged not in wartime, but in the 2053 nuclear explosions that erupt mainly in thermonuclear tests (led, ironically, by the United States). This …

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Help EFF Save Web Content: Prove Podcasting and Media Patent is Wrong

Act now, or this puppy is in grave danger. Podcasting pug photograph (CC) zoomar. Patenting the use of all episodic media on the Web might sound absurd, but the US Patent and Trademark Office has granted just such a patent, to a company called VoloMedia. It’s a significant issue, one that could threaten the freedom of all media distribution online. Wherever you are in the world, you can help. Intellectual property law was created in order to protect genuine inventions and innovation from exploitation. But predatory patents, based on bogus claims and attempting to stake out broad rights, threaten to …

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“Visual Attacks,” Guerrilla Projection, Safety, and the Law

GVJ08 from XPLOITEC on Vimeo. With all the coverage of guerrilla projection and projection mapping outdoors, last week I asked the CDM community what safety and legal considerations came into play with this work. It’s well worth reading through the full comment thread: Can Mobile Projection Get You in Trouble? How Do You Plan? Some of the highlights: Generally, while projection is only light, the use of the building face is considered the use of private property – this seems to be true around the world. Some countries even have specific legal restrictions on commercial use or projection in general. …

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“Visual Attacks,” Guerrilla Projection, Safety, and the Law

GVJ08 from XPLOITEC on Vimeo. With all the coverage of guerrilla projection and projection mapping outdoors, last week I asked the CDM community what safety and legal considerations came into play with this work. It’s well worth reading through the full comment thread: Can Mobile Projection Get You in Trouble? How Do You Plan? Some of the highlights: Generally, while projection is only light, the use of the building face is considered the use of private property – this seems to be true around the world. Some countries even have specific legal restrictions on commercial use or projection in general. …

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Augmented Mural: Hand-Illustrated Landscape Comes to Life, Digitally

Just because you have computers doesn’t mean you have to stop drawing and painting. It’s an obvious revelation, but merging physical and virtual technologies is an art in itself, one that’s just beginning to blossom. To bring environmental messages to life and illustrate the profound connection of the city of San Francisco to its watershed, artist Gabe Shaughnessy and team created a digitally-augmented mural. The mural itself is beautiful, but watch through to about a minute and a half into the video to see something magical happen: projections add virtual animation to the work. The convergence of old and new …

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Microsounds: Compressed Sound Art to Amuse, Shock, and Confuse

Digital technology has the power to transmit information more efficiently, to make the invisible visible, and to express new things. It can also be pushed so far to the limits of actually transmitting information to be meaningless. It can push well beyond what we can even perceive in a useful way. What’s bizarre and wonderful about Johannes Kreidler’s work is that he’s not afraid of pushing toward that boundary. The results may have only a shred of remaining meaning, or be intentionally, comically meaningless. But he’s nothing if not inventive. Compression Sound Art (2009) [“Comments on Music – Musical Zip-Files …

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