“Machine Drawing Drawing Machines” Art Classics by CNC, and Other Pablo Garcia Wonders

What happens when an Albrecht Dürer masterpiece meets CNC? Watch the video above to see. The work of Pittsburgh-based Pablo Garcia, who does collaborative, trans-media work and teaches at Carnegie Mellon, the project nods both to art history and the world of robotics – and it’s just one of Garcia’s works to do so.

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"Machine Drawing Drawing Machines" Art Classics by CNC, and Other Pablo Garcia Wonders

What happens when an Albrecht Dürer masterpiece meets CNC? Watch the video above to see. The work of Pittsburgh-based Pablo Garcia, who does collaborative, trans-media work and teaches at Carnegie Mellon, the project nods both to art history and the world of robotics – and it’s just one of Garcia’s works to do so.

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paperNote1

Voice Messages Become 3D Paper Waveform Sculptures: Paper Note

Instead of writing on paper, a sound executed in paper in three dimensions. All images courtesy the artists. Speaking of making the ephemeral tangible, as artist Andrew Spitz tells us, “it’s a fun process to map something that is so fleeting as a sound to a physical object.” That’s what he does in a new collaboration with Andrew Nip of the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design in Denmark. It’s a simple process – and that’s a good thing, as it means anyone with access to a laser cutter can get in on the fun. Using software written in the open …

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Graffiti Analysis, And Other Meetings of Motion and Sculpture

Barcelona-based artist Evan Roth does beautiful translating motion into three-dimensional, sculptural forms, among his other digital works. In “Graffiti Analysis,” 2010 (video just posted), he algorithmically averages motion capture data from fifteen local tag artists to produce projected motion revealing the process and a squiggly sculpture seen here. Graffiti Analysis, Barcelona, 2010 ABS Thermoplastic 31cm x 20cm x 35cm Barcelona 2010 evan-roth.com http://evan-roth.com/ http://evan-roth.com/work/graffiti-analysis-barcelona-2010/ Related works by the same artist:

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A Kinetic Sonic Organ Sculpture, Made with Cans

In the latest example of kinetic, sound-producing sculpture, an Arduino-controlled organ of moving cans makes eerie, beautiful descending noises. Jakub Koźniewski, a member of the panGenerator collective, sends in details of that group’s work, sponsored in this case by the stuff in the cans: Kinetic audiovisual installation for burn displayed during burn Selector Festival 2011 Movement of the cans is controlled by 9 independent servos connected to the Arduino board while the sound is purely analogue – air pumped by 9 ordinary mattress pumps blows into the “whistles” at the top of plexiglass pipes. Tone is modulated by the current …

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Guerilla Sculptural Visuals: An Intervention with Sol LeWitt, a Backpack Projector

Buckle up and project: that was the mission of a group of art “interventionists”, firing guerilla projections at the public installation of artist Sol LeWitt in Manhattan’s City Hall Park. The weapon of choice itself is one of interest: a self-powered mobile projection rig means live visuals can appear anywhere. The production team describes the project:

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Yarn, in Motion: Projection and Virtuality, Crocheted and Electronic, by Olek and Dev Harlan

Electronic aesthetics have been deeply rooted in live visuals, but that’s even greater reason to explore materiality. Dev Harlan, a New York-based artist working in sculpture, light, and projection, has built a collaboration with the now-legendary Polish-born, New York-crocheting Olek (aka Agata Oleksiak). Olek’s work has included what might best be described as crochet interventions. Whether in a gallery setting or working with the city streets and objects as her canvas, she wraps people and things in crochet. The work has become a ubiquitous part of life here in New York; on the way down Wall Street yesterday, I was …

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As a Wooden Tangible Sequencer Plays Bach, Meditations on Encoding Music

You may have seen it already as it makes its viral rounds, but an advertising video for Japanese mobile giant NTT Docomo is a poetic model of how musical events are encoded, whether through means tangible or digital. A track of pitches makes a wooden ball into a mallet, traversing a track as it is driven by gravity. The keys of that track become a xylophone, the traversal of space sequencing notes in time, and you hear Bach Cantata 147, “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.” While there’s a clever take on a trill, the only disappointment is that we don’t …

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Rainlith: A Robotic, Responsive Rainstick, Powered by Kinect

In a responsive, real-time sculpture, the simple sonic qualities of a rainstick become electronically enhanced. Rainlith, a “kinetic sound art” work by Rui Gato, makes the rainstick itself robotic, its sounds transformed in space in a way that is itself sculptural. Responding to movement in the space using Microsoft’s Kinect, the apparatus is a geektastic brew of just about every tool you could imagine involved in this sort of construction. The artist shares full details, reproduced here in both English and Portugese – and Rui, thanks for sending this in:

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pianola

Playing the City: An Eindhoven Pianola Makes Urban Landscape into Music

Digital or analog, the essence of recording and production is the act of representing. One thing becomes another; one medium stores information about another. That representation can also be physical, tangible, and visible. In a sculptural pianola, Akko Goldenbeld turns the Dutch city of Eindhoven into a pianola roll, so that the landscape of buildings and streets acts as a physical musical score. I think it raises some questions about whether translating the one into the other obscures the experience of a city rather than clarifies it, but that would discount the act of watching it: with the visual connected …

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