VDMX Adds Wondrous Shader Features – And a Spec For Adding Them to Visual Tools

They’re a recent addition to popular OS X live visual app VDMX. But now is the perfect time to talk about the magic of shaders, generally. Standard “fragment shaders” are capable of performing feats of visual wonder as both generators and effects, using geometry and pixels. Written in GLSL, they are portable to any OpenGL-compliant graphics card, which now includes a range of modern hardware on both mobile and desktop devices. And since they run on the GPU, they do all of this magic on optimized hardware – without straining your CPU. Despite Apple’s reputation for being proprietary, they’ve been …

READ MORE →

Across the Universe: Mind-Blowing AV Performance Makes Music a Spacey Trip

Turning music and sound into three-dimensional worlds often yields something that fields like a trip through space. But this feels like a real trip. Through pulsing, glowing starfields, “Versum”‘s audiovisual movements are brain-bendingly transformative. Artist Tarik Barri has created an integrated world of sound and image that makes the interface and the compositional realms seamless. It seems as though this really is a musical universe, through whose harmonies of the spheres you can fly like. Boldly going, indeed. Ingredients: Max/MSP/Jitter, Processing, Java, SuperCollider, GLSL [the 3D shading language], and … some serious skill and time, I imagine. The work has …

READ MORE →

More Coding Fun on iPad, Android, Beyond: Play with GLSL's Magical OpenGL Goodness

Want to work on your coding chops, but get away from the slavery of your desk and your laptop? Want to stretch out on the couch – or the cramped confines of a bus or coach plane flight? (Hello, EasyJet!) We saw yesterday how you can work with your iPad and Processing, via Processing.js. Here’s another option. GLSL Studio, a tool which was already a fun way to play around with 3D coding, continues to grow. It’s a full-blown OpenGL ES 2.0 coding environment, running on … well, a full-blown OpenGL ES 2.0 3D platform, all in a wafer-thin tablet …

READ MORE →

More Coding Fun on iPad, Android, Beyond: Play with GLSL’s Magical OpenGL Goodness

Want to work on your coding chops, but get away from the slavery of your desk and your laptop? Want to stretch out on the couch – or the cramped confines of a bus or coach plane flight? (Hello, EasyJet!) We saw yesterday how you can work with your iPad and Processing, via Processing.js. Here’s another option. GLSL Studio, a tool which was already a fun way to play around with 3D coding, continues to grow. It’s a full-blown OpenGL ES 2.0 coding environment, running on … well, a full-blown OpenGL ES 2.0 3D platform, all in a wafer-thin tablet …

READ MORE →

More WebGL Fun: Use Shaders in a Browser, Play a Game with Fireflies

If your WebGL appetite still wants more 3D goodness in your browser, here are two additional examples since last week’s story. Via Tiago, Shadertoy is an in-browser renderer that allows you to edit shader code in GLSL (the basic language of an OpenGL GPU) and render it in-browser. The only bad news is that this project from 2009 may not have kept up with rapidly-changing browser specs; for me, 2D shaders worked perfectly on an NVIDIA 320M, but not anything 3D, in either Chrome or Firefox. But some of you know much more about this than I do, so have …

READ MORE →

Forward-Compatible Effects: Use FreeFrame Plugins in FreeFrameGL with fugWrapperGL

An information-dense twitter tip from Bigfug has notified us of some great news for those who love FreeFrameGL’s high performance mojo, but are sad about all their great FreeFrame Classic (yes, I just made that nomenclature up) effects gathering digital dust. fugWrapperGL is a plugin which allows you to use FreeFrame 1.0 plugins in FreeFrameGL (aka FreeFrame 1.5). It’s an alpha release, so it may break your stuff, but you won’t know unless you try, so give it a spin! FreeFrame Feedback in “Kitchen Redux” by eightprime For the deep-geeks, BigFug has also releaseda FreeFrameGL Streaming plugin, to move video …

READ MORE →

Video Tutorial: Get Max-y Jitter-y Goodness in Cell DNA, for Moshing Your Optical Flow

Add Max patch effects to DNA. from Livid Instruments on Vimeo. Yesterday, we saw some splashy video distortion techniques applied to real-time video. You know what that means: it’s time to use these in live performance. Liquidify Video, Live: Optical Flow GLSL Datamosh Technique Here’s one start.Peter Nyboer, Max whiz and Livid developer, has run with the idea of squishing around video using optical flow analysis, and shows you how to add the effect to Livid’s Cell DNA VJ app. For Jitter users, this means you can rely on Cell for quick access to video taps and files, while adding …

READ MORE →

Liquidify Video, Live: Optical Flow GLSL Datamosh Technique

motion distortion 2 from andrew benson on Vimeo. Datamosh? (The “forbidden” but harmlessly meaningless word?) Video squishification? Mushy data? Call it what you will, but applying real-time distortion and displacement to video so that video textures become flowing layers of pixels looks absolutely beautiful. Andrew Benson of Cycling ‘74 has only just begun playing with this in Jitter using GLSL shaders, and already the results are really compelling. (For a simpler example that looks more like the compression artifact technique we’ve seen recently, have a look at the second video – though, personally, I like the more sophisticated, layered approach …

READ MORE →

Pixel Bender: Accelerated Filter Goodness in CS4

Earlier this week, I talked about some of the consumer-oriented feature improvements in Adobe Creative Suite CS4. But the most interesting development from Adobe is actually more on the developer side. Pixel Bender is a new format for making GPU-accelerated (and CPU multi-threaded) filters, which means fast blends (with different blend modes) and special effects. You can even use it for math operations. Now, whether or not you yourself are able to code these sorts of things, I’m sure we’ll see plenty of filters being passed around online. True, it means dealing with yet another way of creating these filters, …

READ MORE →

Neon VJ App Goes Open Source, Gets New Lease on Life, Makes Demo Mayhem

Neon is among the best of a breed of obscure, indie VJ software gems around the world. The creation of mac/xplsv.com and later shine/xplsv.com, it’s made a mark not only as a VJ performance app but as a creator of real-time motion demos. It can event manipulate 3D Studio Max 7 scenes in real-time. All of this goodness could simply die as the developer moves on, but instead shine has decided to open source the code. That gives this Windows-only software a shot at a port to Mac and/or Linux, and turns it into a playground for would-be visual programmers, …

READ MORE →