firefighter

These Students Put Out Fires with The Power of Bass

The next time you’re facing a life-threatening fire in, say, your kitchen, you may simply shout, “where’s the drop?” George Mason University engineering seniors Seth Robertson and Viet Tran have made a fire extinguisher that works entirely using sound. If you haven’t seen it making the social media rounds yet, of course, it’s worth posting here. Not only is it absurdly cool to watch, but it’s the latest reminder that music, sound engineering, and science can go hand in hand. That is, music is made of sound, and the study of sound overlaps with engineering and physics. In fact, this …

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Concept: Rubik’s Cube as Interactive Electronic Music Tool Interface [Video]

MusixCube from Stefan Horak on Vimeo. It’s just a concept, but it’s an excellent one: the classic Rubik’s Cube here is transformed into a tangible music interface. Grid squares light up as icons, colored feedback animates sounds, and twisting the blocks around provides access to interface options and even parameter control. Someone. Make this happen. From Kiel, Germany (north of Hamburg) and artist/student Hauke Scholz. Hauke, let’s do this for real. A tool for producing electronic music, based on the interaction of the Rubik’s Cube, B.A. Thesis project at Muthesius Academy Of Fine Arts And Design by Hauke Scholz Video …

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insideorganalpha

Electronic Body Music: Organ Alpha a Sonic Installation That Makes You Into Sound

In an extended fancy on the sounds inside the body “Organ Alpha” is a kind of responsive musical instrument that transforms human input into surround-sound audio. Your body speaks, it listens, and it answers. Sensors watch for movement inside a virtual stomach, as stethoscopes dangle, inviting input. Watch for the kid’s reaction in the video. The project is the work of Israeli-born, UK-based media artist Avi Ashkenazi and Scottish textile designer Marion Lean, for their MA at Goldsmiths. I think it’s worth posting as part of an ongoing series of works that use biological interaction as the basis for music, …

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Experimental Light Sculpture, Against a Fragmented Wall [Video, Inspiration]

Experimental Light Sculpture from Karim Mansour on Vimeo. There’s something about seeing new work from students. It’s one thing to see something fully emerged, but another, unique pleasure, to watch it as it develops. And so, here’s a particularly good example from the first semester of 2012, a team of visual students from Germany experimenting with the potential of light. It’s not really “projection mapping” – in fact, it’s rather the opposite. While it is popular at the moment to use deformations in the projection to tailor an image to the surface, here, the surface disrupts the image. (The latter …

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Cinema 4D, Now Free for Students; Eye Candy, Ho!

TRIā–²NGLE from Onur Senturk on Vimeo. While various powerful options are available, Cinema 4D has become a go-to tool for three-dimensional motion graphics, including those looking for a factory to produce slick visuals for live performance. Now, that power is free for students. (free as in beer – something I hear students also use for its powerful features) The good news: if you’re a student, you get a shot at grabbing the full software completely free. It’s a full-featured version, containing everything but network rendering. The bad news: that’s “students,” not teachers. (Continuing Ed, anyone?) “Selected countries” get the offer; …

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Kinect in Teaching: Playful Puppets, Terrains, Lighting, and More Breakthroughs

Teaching has its moments of reward and frustration in equal measure, but I’m of the belief that there are no limits to the new ideas that can grow out of groups of engaged students. In fact, it’s often in the first draft, the first experiment, the first time a student has tried something that I feel like I see the greatest spark of new ideas. Freed of concerns about whether something has been done before (looking at you, jaded artists and comment trolls alike), liberated by the bone-crunching stress of deadlines (ahem, yes, they do have a motivating impact), students …

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Anamorphic Architecture, in a Seoul Storefront, Plays with Projected Dimensions

An unseen, imagined world is becoming as accessible to today’s generation as the typewriter or graphite pencil was to a generation before. Geometrical theory, in two and three dimensions, has been illustrated for many centuries. But now, we can play with those geometries in our own finite world, as liquid and changeable there as they can be in the mind. How any kid (young or old) could fail to fall in love with the geometric discipline now is beyond me. The work above is just one glimpse of that world, a subtle and informal one staged by a studio class …

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What Are Students Doing with Pd for Interactive Visuals? Plenty

Via the Pd announce list, a class of students are doing some pretty sophisticated experiments in design and interaction using Pd. I tend to have my own students focus on Pd for sound-making (since it naturally lends itself to signal flow) and use Processing for visuals (some are also using OpenFrameworks), but I’m impressed with the progress they made. As students explore sites like OpenProcessing.org, I find that people are being more generous with their code, and – this is brave, I think – even sharing new code, warts and all, as they’re learning. Have a look. You might learn …

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