Arm Tracks: All-Body-Controlled Ableton Live, with Kinect, Brings Shirtless Musical Innovation

As it happens, hunching over your computer does not center your body and mind. So, drawing from yoga and other practices, Adriano Clemente is getting his whole body into the act of making music. While Kinect is not a perfect solution for every vision application, either in tracking capability or latency, it is stunningly good at following your skeleton through space. And here, using moderated, slow-moving motion, the body can navigate musical worlds with applomb. With apologies to everyone staying up late at night working on tracks in your undies, it’s also a convincing excuse to perform music without shirt …

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PONK: Touchless Air Hockey, with Kinect + Flash, Groovy ’80s Neon Graphics

Enough gimmick. Let’s get down to serious business, the stuff that illuminates our life and gives us a deeper sense of humanity. Yes, I mean air hockey. Yes, I’m dead serious. (Hey, I’m a fan.) In a brilliant – and brilliantly-colored – new project, the power of computer vision reinvents a familiar tabletop game. Live-animated elements and gameplay that connects with just about everybody are a recipe for something really successful. French co-creator Jonathan Da Costa explains:

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PONK: Touchless Air Hockey, with Kinect + Flash, Groovy '80s Neon Graphics

Enough gimmick. Let’s get down to serious business, the stuff that illuminates our life and gives us a deeper sense of humanity. Yes, I mean air hockey. Yes, I’m dead serious. (Hey, I’m a fan.) In a brilliant – and brilliantly-colored – new project, the power of computer vision reinvents a familiar tabletop game. Live-animated elements and gameplay that connects with just about everybody are a recipe for something really successful. French co-creator Jonathan Da Costa explains:

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beatthang_virt

Kinect VJ, Anyone? Live Visual Performance with Kinect

Kinect Test @ /// Lazercrunk from /// *** this.riley *** \ on Vimeo. Spotted: Our friend Riley Harmon, experimenting with Kinect as a live performance tool in Pittsburgh, in what I expect will be the first of many such performances coming around the world. playing around testing the kinect @ brillobox pittsburgh Openframeworks.cc tuio.org/​ osculator.net/​ OF, FFT OSC, MSA 3D Shape, Kinect, TUIO This comes just days after the release of a TUIO library for Kinect, which helps the open source Kinect project to speak the lingua franca of today’s connected visual software, OpenSoundControl (which is open and provides control …

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Virtual Theremin Made with Kinect; Real Thereminists Will Make it Useful

Therenect – Kinect Theremin from Martin Kaltenbrunner on Vimeo. Who says technology has to move fast and die young? Leon Theremin may have been a full century ahead of his time, before computers, before transistors, before jet engines or atomic power or rockets. ReacTable creator Martin Kaltenbrunner has a virtual Theremin prototype built with Microsoft’s depth-sensing, 3D Kinect camera. And what he really needs is some players of the real Theremin to help develop it. Martin writes CDM:

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Kinect with Anything: TUIO Gestures from Kinect

TuioKinect from Martin Kaltenbrunner on Vimeo. Post hacking, Kinect is starting to look like it could be a do-anything controller in the mold of Nintendo’s Wii remote. Martin Kaltenbrunner, of ReacTable fame, has already posted a convenient application that maps gestures from Kinect to TUIO. (TUIO is a lightweight set of message specs atop OSC, one that can easily be supported by any application and platform, and which is already used by a number of tools.) The app opens countless musical and visual interactive applications. As Martin describes it: TuioKinect tracks simple hand gestures using the Kinect controller and sends …

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Apple Magic Trackpad as Multi-Touch Input, and Cross-Platform Multi-Touch

Apple today, alongside beefed-up iMacs with quad-core and Mac Pro towers with twelve, introduced a $69 Bluetooth trackpad accessory with multi-touch gesture support. http://www.apple.com/magictrackpad/ I’m not a huge fan of trackpads over mice, but yes, this does give you a cheap multi-touch input to play with. And we haven’t seen much in the dirt-cheap, under-$100 space. Wacom’s Bamboo Pen & Touch is a fun, decent-enough tablet available at a street price about the same as the Magic Trackpad. But its “multi-touch” functionality consists of a set of hard-wired gestures – developers can’t get at discrete touch points directly on the …

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SenseWall: Open, Free Platform for Multi-Touch, More; Wants Your Work

SenseWall (preliminary) from Tiago Serra on Vimeo. Multi-touch walls have been a closely-guarded novelty, but they’re evolving into something else: a real, usable platform that focuses on content and not just gimmicks. In the process, a hard-working community is building richer, standards-based, cross-platform, free and open source tools. The result: faster iteration, broader access of artists to the technology, and soon, hopefully, better and better work. Tiago Serra writes with his latest project, based on the Community Core Vision project. He includes a call for works that I think a number of CDM readers may want to check out. SenseBloom …

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Qeve: Free Live Visual – VJ Software, Built in Pd

Qeve is a promising-looking, open-source visual performance tool built in visual patching environment Pure Data (Pd). It was built primarily on Ubuntu Linux but should also run with some adjustment on Mac. (Pd itself runs on Windows, but some of the visual dependencies are not available on that platform. I’d still recommend Linux.) Aside from being free and open, and a set of patches you can go in and modify, there are some nice-looking features here: Audiovisual mixing and step sequencing, transitions Video browsing Beat sync and master clock 3 layers, supporting multiple formats (video, 3D, photos, text, paint), 3D/2D …

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Computer Vision Markers, Designed by You – Not Ugly Patterns

Pens and pencils out – it’s time to call back those art skills and start drawing tags. Computer vision is all the rage again. One assumption seems to be that you’ll know the technology has evolved when markers – graphical identifiers that allow the camera to more easily spot control points in the image – go away. Not so fast. The beauty of markers in computer vision (like the popular ARToolkit) is twofold. First, those markers are there for a reason. Adding specific graphical information to an image can improve recognition, improve recognition in specific circumstances (like changing lighting), and …

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