Fork this Chant: GitHub Goes Gregorian, with Open Source Notation

Before there was computer code, there was music notation. And before there was forking code or remixing music, there were centuries of variations to the musical code, stored in notation. So it’s fitting that musicians would begin to use GitHub – built originally as a repository for programmers – to store notation. And that means that in addition to music software and the like, you can find the WWII-era Nova Organi Harmonia organ accompaniments today on GitHub. Adam Wood, Director of Music with St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Hurst, Texas, made the addition, with help from a team including Jeff …

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Open Source Code Changes Visualized; Results Amazingly Hypnotic

You’ll hear odd cynicism about people working on free software / open source projects. Something like, “well, harumph, it’s not as though a bunch of people will make this stuff in their free time.” Not only are these folks wrong, but you can actually visualize the contributions to source trees – and the results look spectacularly hypnotic. It’s free software – the music video. Okay, now, granted, I may get so mesmerized by the results that I’ll just spend time staring at that instead of getting actual work done, but – working too hard isn’t good for you, anyway. It’s …

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Version Control and Sharing for Patching: Keep Those Max, Pd Patches in Order with Git

Patches serve as the glue for performing with open controllers like the monome. With proper version control, you can manage their evolution – and share your creative process more easily. Photo by me. If you’ve worked at all with patching your own creations for music, visuals, and control, this has probably happened to you: you’ve made some change, and forgot what you did. You think of something you did some time ago – and forget what it was. Or you want to be able to easily collaborate with other people, and that means a lot of files flying around and …

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