*Spark D-Fuser Official Announcement Video: The DVI Mixer Approacheth

If you’re a visualist, working with digital video, then shit is in the process of becoming real. Toby*Spark initially announced the “*Spark D-Fuser” Sub-$1000 DVI mixer project 8 months ago, and followed up with some more specifics. If you Follow Toby on Twitter then you will have seen some sporadic details and titillating photos appear over the intervening months. Now, of course, VisualBerlin Festival is happening, and it’s an auspicious time for an announcement: *spark d-fuser: dvi mixer project presentation [2010] from toby*spark on Vimeo. Toby’s presentation is a beautiful enunciation of why this kind of hardware is important and …

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Too Much Fun with Thermography and Spitting

Oh, don’t act all surprised and shocked. You know you’d go and do the same thing if you had access to a thermo camera. Bartek Polonski sends us an unusual twist on computer vision, combining thermography with basic code in Processing in order to subtract water from the scene. (No details on the specific camera – anyone familiar with available cameras for this task?) Thermal cameras are used in airports and such, but as a visual tool it takes on a different function. Bartas explains: It’s so simple, some processing blob tracking code i wrote in few minutes. Even fade …

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Live Mobile Video Stitching, Omni Projector: Microsoft Research Goodies

Whatever your feelings about Microsoft, their R&D operation employs some of the smartest minds in the business – and has done so for a long time. TechFest is the event that shares some of the best experiments. Some turn into products, others don’t, but the events always have some gems, and can provide plenty of inspiration. What I’m personally most excited about is the pace of progress in image analysis and processing. You’ve already seen me marvel at projects that merge and stretch images in 2D and 3D, seamlessly, and each time, I wondered about video: Microsoft Live Labs Photosynth …

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Processing Tutorials: Getting Started with Video Processing via OpenCV

Examples of OpenCV routines from the Processing library documentation. Of course, it’s up to you to build on these techniques and make art. It’s a relatively easy thing for computers to “see” video, but “computer vision” goes a step further, applying a wide range of techniques by which computers can begin to understand and process the content of a video input. These techniques tend toward the primitive, but they can also produce aesthetically beautiful results. The best place to start with computer vision has long been the standard library, OpenCV. A free (as in beer and freedom) library developed by …

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Bill Etra's Pioneering Video Processing Work: Retrospective @ Blip.tv

Click To Play Bill Etra, the analog video processing pioneer, has been posting some of his original works from the late 1960s through 2005 on video sharing site Blip.tv. It’s a sort of ongoing retrospective of his work. His techniques are varied, including Rutt-Etra processing (using the hardware he co-designed), hand-controlled oscillator-to-RGB inputs, and laptop-based software rigs. While not a complete archive, it’s an interesting look back at important works and techniques. I’m glad this is online; it’s hard to find useful archives of older analog pieces simply because most techniques involved were incredibly hard to capture to tape. Usually …

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Bill Etra’s Pioneering Video Processing Work: Retrospective @ Blip.tv

Click To Play Bill Etra, the analog video processing pioneer, has been posting some of his original works from the late 1960s through 2005 on video sharing site Blip.tv. It’s a sort of ongoing retrospective of his work. His techniques are varied, including Rutt-Etra processing (using the hardware he co-designed), hand-controlled oscillator-to-RGB inputs, and laptop-based software rigs. While not a complete archive, it’s an interesting look back at important works and techniques. I’m glad this is online; it’s hard to find useful archives of older analog pieces simply because most techniques involved were incredibly hard to capture to tape. Usually …

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