Ephemeral Images in Water: Projection on a Water Fountain, Lichtsicht Biennale [Gallery]

advection | robert seidel | projection on a water fountain | lichtsicht biennale 2013 from Robert Seidel on Vimeo. This goes far, far off the screen. Light dances across water droplets, disappearing into mists, images rippling on reflections on the pond’s surface. Projecting onto a fountain means some seriously-powerful projectors, but armed with that, the effect is spectacular – another reminder of the possibilities beyond conventional projection surfaces. And the results in Robert Seidel’s work, a commission for the Lichtsicht Biennale, Bad Rothenfelde, Germany, are simply spectacular, a show in wet, colored sprays. Full details:

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Motion Controlling a Water Drop: Entropy, An Arduino, A Laser Pointer, and a Gorgeous Watery Animation

In an elegant, balletic dive, taking an almost impossibly-long span of time, a single droplet of water falls and splashes, an animated logo peeking out from the inside. But it’s what isn’t there that may surprise you. There’s slow motion camera behind the scenes, meaning the usual way of doing this is absent. Instead, what you’re seeing is a stop motion time lapse – a record of the shifting patterns of entropy in nature, thousands of different droplets appearing as connected that in reality are not. It’s a trick of animation and high-speed lighting, not high-speed photography, stroboscopic illusion. And …

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An Ethereal Water Projection in Belfast

DSNT// Water Projection from DSNT on Vimeo. Expect some serious brightness to make it work, but water can be an ethereal, otherworldly surface for light, blurring the lines between substance and image. Oisín O’Brien of DSNT sends this brief but beautiful work from Belfast. DSNT are busy, too, providing both musical content and visual design for this creation. Oisín shares some technical details with CDM: The screen of water was created by a series of jets which where mounted on the & floated out into the lake. The jets created a haze which carried the light, to get the amount …

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Multi-Touch Particles: Make Virtual Sparks with Your Hands, on a Water Screen

Superfluid vs Particle from jimi hertz on Vimeo. Speaking of insanely-cool multi-touch magic and the wonderful resource that is the NUI Group, CDMo Fave Memo is working with Jim Hertz to do ridiculous things with water screens (water as in H2O) and particles (the virtual kind). I could explain, but watching says it all. Or, as their marketing puts it: Ever heard about MSA Fluids ? Ever had particles on your water screen ? Mad scientist Memo Akten wields the immeasurable Power Processing Particles (PPP) and is one of the most powerful entities within the Multitouch Universe; he has created …

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Hydraulophone: Water Jet/Fountain/Underwater MIDI Keyboard Instruments

Steve Mann, Chris Aimone, et al of the University of Toronto have developed a system for using streams of water to play a musical instrument. They describe the results in theoretical terms for the academic community, referring to ancient Greek water organs and the ability to have greater tactile feedback than other alternative instruments. But let’s get to the bottom line: this is a fun water toy that is not only tactile, but wet. You can play the instrument by manipulating streams of water directly: The “FUNtain” (hydraulophone) is an interactive multimedia fountain that responds when people block, one or …

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Future of Music Tech, As Envisioned by BBC Comedy Writers

The hilarious send-up of educational films that was Look Around You: Music was only the beginning. BBC comedy show Look Around You has its own fantastic website filled with still more goodies. And it gives us a much clearer idea of the future of music technology than, say, a teaser from Moog. Readers have been sending in “Life in the Year 2000” entries, which include the five-string bass guitar, sex changes using Bach violin concertos, and my personal favorite, Halson Hoek’s invention that improves your keyboard chops by sending electrical shocks through metal gauntlets. At this point, that might be …

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Jaws Soundtrack: Remixed, Underwater

Artist Abinadi Meza has created a remixed composition of the “lighthearted” sounds of the movie Jaws (think drunken sailor sounds and off-key clarinet blasts), into a piece that wlll only be played underwater. To hear the output of the submerged speakers, you have to strip to your skivvies and float in the ocean. Title: Soft Jaws. Details of the project plus an MP3 for landlubbers are available from PS122 Gallery’s Artwurl zine. Speaking of this, have any of you experimented with underwater speaker placement? (or simulating it digitally?)

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More on Mocean: Pipe Organ Controlled by Water Tank

I looked at Mocean last month, but Liubo Borissov, one of its creators, alerted me to an updated site with better documentation and video: Mocean @ Organic Interfaces Here’s where it gets really cool: the Mocean creators hooked up the water tank to a pipe organ (video included). The impact of the water interface on the harmonic content of the organ is simply sublime. I could go on, but go check it out for yourself! (Setup: MIDI organ + Jitter software.) Liubo tells us Mocean 3 will be “bigger and badder” and “almost a bathtub.” Can’t wait. If you can …

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Mocean: Water as Musical Instrument

Mocean is an interactive installation that uses a tank of water as an interface for sound. Dip your hands in the tank, and the installation whistles and hums. The water doesn't create the sound directly; instead, an array of antique organ pipes resonate above the tank, triggered by a video camera that analyzes pictures of the water. (Complex but interesting solution!) Mocean was created by Maia Marinelli, Jared Lamenzo, and Liubo Borissov (in NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program or ITP); I found out about it as I'm in a residency now with Liubo at Dance Theater Workshop here in New York. …

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Pianoquarium

This week's understatement of note: "Sometimes I am self-driven to do some weird stuff. I have no idea why." Indeed, Troy Errthum. Like turning an old upright piano into a 20-gallon pianoquarium, complete with live fish. (via hackaday) The piano itself is no longer playable (guess that's what happens when you replace the soundboard with fish), but there's room for an electric piano. CDM challenges its readers to start building fish storage into digital instruments. Maybe there's a market here.

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