Barbie Video Cam Versus Canon 7D, Toys, and Relativity

Canon 7D vs. Barbie Video Girl from Brandon Bloch on Vimeo. Ah, the eternal debate over what constitutes a “toy.” We’re again seeing it as musicians snap up the cheap, smartly-designed keytar for Rock Band 3. (That should make a nice visual controller, too, though perhaps visuals are really the perfect application for the guitar.) Whether an iPhone is a toy camera could be in doubt, but Barbie leaves nothing to chance. The video above is nothing if not a brilliant parody of the massive relativism of today’s capture devices. It made the rounds when it came out a couple …

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PS3 Eye Camera Drivers Updated for Windows: Fixes, Performance, Options, Awesomeness

Whoo! That’s three cat/leopard/dog photos in a roll! And now… I’ll stop. Photo (CC) csullens, who I hope doesn’t object – do you need model clearance for felines? What counts as really big news in my special technology world is, I’ll admit, a little different than everyone else. But it’s tough to really convey the special love affair I have for the Sony PS3 Eye camera – just as it was hard to explain to the local GameStop employee that, no, I don’t actually have the PS3 game system. So the big news for me today: rocking out new Windows …

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Webcam Choreography: Director of Sour’s “People as Pixels” Clip Explain Low-Budget Magic

We Love You So – the blog attached to Spike Jonze’s “Where The Wild Things Are” feature, continues to post lovely things. Recently they followed up with Magico Nakamura, one of the four “co-directors” of Sour‘s beautiful “Hibi no Neiro” video (previously on CDMo), interviewing him on the techniques they used to choreograph over 80 people/pixels. Could the participants see any of the other webcams, or were they blindly relying on your directions? We filmed everyone separately so there weren’t multiple webcams on the screen however, we made quite detailed animatics of the entire music video and would send it …

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Webcam Choreography: Director of Sour's "People as Pixels" Clip Explain Low-Budget Magic

We Love You So – the blog attached to Spike Jonze’s “Where The Wild Things Are” feature, continues to post lovely things. Recently they followed up with Magico Nakamura, one of the four “co-directors” of Sour‘s beautiful “Hibi no Neiro” video (previously on CDMo), interviewing him on the techniques they used to choreograph over 80 people/pixels. Could the participants see any of the other webcams, or were they blindly relying on your directions? We filmed everyone separately so there weren’t multiple webcams on the screen however, we made quite detailed animatics of the entire music video and would send it …

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Flash Augmented Reality, Made Easier: Open Source FLARManager

You’ve seen the demos. You like the idea of tracking tags in the real world to create visuals. And now you want to try augmented reality for yourself – and, incidentally, you’re a Flash developer. Reader Eric Socolofsky writes to share a framework he’s created that makes it much easier to work with the Flash-based, open source FLARToolkit, called FLARManager. Version 0.4 is just released: http://words.transmote.com/wp/20090618/flarmanager-v04/ FLARManager has a number of features that improve upon the existing work done by FLARToolkit: Building the apps themselves is easier. Fire up the framework with Flex Builder (or Flash, or Eclipse, or FlashDevelop), …

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PS3 Eye Cam Optimization, Mac and Beyond

Via Aaron Meyers, who’s getting ready for some fun projects at Eyebeam here in New York this week, anyone using a camera for capture, live video, or tracking needs to check out this copious thread on the OpenFrameworks forum: beginners ~ Sony PS3 Eye We already knew Sony’s US$40 PS3 Eye camera was a wonder; that’s why we strongly recommended its use in the tangible interface hackday hosted earlier this month. But while we’ve heard some good luck squeezing performance out of the thing on Windows and Linux, the Mac – while reliable – could use more options and performance. …

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Sony Eyes Motion Control, Augmented Reality

2009 will be remembered as the E3 game event that embraced computer vision. Far from me-too answers to the Wii’s gestural controllers, we saw remarkably different visions of how computer tracking might work. As expected, Sony had their own motion tracking system to unveil at their press conference. But unlike Microsoft’s 3D camera, Sony opted to build on their already-lovable PlayStation 3 Eye camera with wands with spheres. The controllers look ridiculous, and lack the magic of the Microsoft demos. But don’t dismiss them out of hand. (Sorry, there’s no way to write this story without lots of abstract puns.) …

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Getting Started in Flash Augmented Reality

Grant Michaels points to a lovely post on getting started with augmented reality using Flash. FlarToolkit/Flash Augmented Reality [Mikko Haapoja] It’s all free for FlarToolkit, and with free tools for Flex out there, you could build a whole free toolchain. Of course, we tend to like Java and Processing round these parts, so I can add “make a tutorial for Java” to my massive to-do list – unless someone else has already done it!

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Non-Apple Webcams on Mac: Still a Huge Headache

Believe it or not, people making art with webcams don’t rate very highly on the priority list for big computer companies. (Who would have thought?) On the PC, at least, there’s a thriving market for webcams for video chat, since so few PCs have built-in cameras. Meanwhile, on the Mac, Apple has absolutely zero interest in you using any webcams other than those built into their machines, or, if you’re lucky, one of the FireWire iSights Apple made before Apple discontinued them. (Given the high failure rate I’ve seen on the iSights, that assumes you’re lucky enough not only to …

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Open-Source 3D Webcam MIDI Controller

Interested in using webcams to translate on-screen motion to MIDI? Want x, y, and z 3D tracking? Ben Tan writes to let us know about his in-development software project called Peripheral MIDI Controller (pmidic) which does just that. The current build is still a work in progress, but has added enough stability and features that it should be worth a look. Peripheral MIDI Controller Grab your pen light and start waving it around for filter cutoff and resonance — whoo! Right now, it’s Windows-only, but the libraries on which it’s built are cross-platform and could be ported to both Linux …

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