New Vimeo is Here, and It's Brilliant; Creative Commons Visualist Community, Anyone?

You’ve likely already seen it, but now that we’ve had some days to adjust and it’s rolled out to everyone, it’s worth noting that the new Vimeo is simply awesome. (It’s available to all, though you do have to opt in, which I recommend.) I don’t want to get carried away with fanboyism, but to me, Vimeo has become the content production, content distribution, and creative portfolio to beat – even as YouTube firmly entrenches itself as the “just go viral” platform for everybody else. While some other rivals have stumbled around trying a new formula, Vimeo has waited patiently …

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New Vimeo is Here, and It’s Brilliant; Creative Commons Visualist Community, Anyone?

You’ve likely already seen it, but now that we’ve had some days to adjust and it’s rolled out to everyone, it’s worth noting that the new Vimeo is simply awesome. (It’s available to all, though you do have to opt in, which I recommend.) I don’t want to get carried away with fanboyism, but to me, Vimeo has become the content production, content distribution, and creative portfolio to beat – even as YouTube firmly entrenches itself as the “just go viral” platform for everybody else. While some other rivals have stumbled around trying a new formula, Vimeo has waited patiently …

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devil-loc

SoundToys’ Distorting Compressor Free for Two More Days, Plus Some Great Production Reading

Through Thursday, March 31 at midnight, you can grab SoundToys’ Devil-Loc plug-in for free, concluding a giveaway that began at the TapeOp party at South by Southwest. Devil-Loc is a nice-sounding emulation of the Shure M62. Chris Conover, in thanks for a Record beta I sent his way, points to the offer, a code (which I’ll share with readers), and mentions some ways he likes to use it – particularly, he says, on drum room mics: It is inspired by the Shure M62 Level-Loc, which was designed to be a leveling amplifier for microphones to avoid spikes and fades. Users …

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Virtual Synths: Modeling Gear, as Imagined by Communities and Engineers

Do Androids Dream of Electric Synths? Imagining an instrument from a clean sheet of paper is an essential part of the design process. It can remind us of the extent of possibilities – and, sometimes, why compromise is necessary. The German site Amazona.de this week unveiled mock-ups of an instrument conceived by their community. The design looks terrific, and the specs (below) do read like the sorts of things synthesists would want. My only concern is that the results could be very cost prohibitive; the obvious remedy it seems would be to use digital oscillators in place of the eight-voice …

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