Fractals, Bots, Nodes, and Patternists: Onyx Ashanti’s Cyborg Music Meets the Ensemble [Guest Post]

Get ready: from one more-than-human musical cyborg, a robotic horde of beatjazz artists. Onyx Ashanti isn’t satisfied just augmenting his own body and musical expression with 3D-printed, sensor-laden prostheses. He’s extending that solo performance with bots that crawl around and gesture for feedback, then – inspired by the organic beauty of fractal geometry – is binding together performers with his system in a networked system of nodes. Just don’t call it a jam session. Call them patternists. If this sounds crazy, it is: crazy in just the way we like. But amidst this hyper-futuristic vision of performance, Onyx also writes …

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The Particle: Responsive, Kinetic Sculpture from Hangar.org

The Particle v1.0 from Alex Posada on Vimeo. How much sonic and eye-popping goodness can you wrap into a big, light-up sphere? So much goodness. “The Particle” is a kinetic sculpture produced at Barcelona’s visual arts workshop Hangar by software and interactive audiovisual artist Alex Posada. Packed with custom electronics and using XBee for wireless communications, the creation responds to the space around it, transforming movement into color and sound. It’s perhaps the perfect response to advances in particle physics; just as unseen particles are, the orb is entangled with what happens around it. Rings of colored LED lights rotate …

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Wireless MIDI Hack: XBee + MIDI Hardware = No Wires

Interested in experimenting with MIDI, minus the wires? Why not try a DIY hack yourself? Limor Fried aka Lady Ada of Adafruit Industries has posted a detailed tutorial on transmitting MIDI over the inexpensive and relatively friendly XBee wireless module. It’s a bit of a hack – you force the XBee to communicate at MIDI baud rate, and on Windows, at least, you have to fool the OS into using MIDI’s non-standard baud rate for serial communications. But it seems to work. That’s where you come in: Limor’s got some folks testing this, but we could use some additional real-world …

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