We’ve seen apps made exclusively for touch devices like the iPad. And we’ve seen very basic touch support in desktop apps. But Bitwig Studio 1.3 is both.

So, on the same day we find out about a proper touch laptop, we also get a DAW that’s ready, today, to take advantage of it. (See also FL Studio below, though Bitwig brings specific support for Microsoft’s new displays, and some new ideas.)

Also, is Bitwig actually trolling Mac fans, or Apple? Because Bitwig is touting the fact that OS X will at least get its new “E-Cowbell device.” (I’m not making this up.)

For multi-touch devices on Windows and Linux (yes, Linux) – plus a specially-optimized profile for Microsoft Surface Pro and Surface Book – Bitwig has a lot of new touch features. They aren’t just responding to touch events; they’re going further.

1005_Header_Touch_03-1

1005_Header_Touch_04

Full multi-touch support. This is, of course, essential. It doesn’t work on OS X – there literally isn’t a model for processing the events – but it does open up some possibilities even on Linux.

Here’s what that looks like when mixing:

Radial menu and gestures. To try to make touch more useful, Bitwig are also adding a shortcut menu, for quick gestural access to settings for devices, drums, clips, arrangement, notes, and tracks. I really have no idea whether I’m convinced by this without having used it, but I’m intrigued. It also represents a different approach than Ableton’s, which has been to focus on moving control to physical hardware (Push). Clearly, there’s an argument for each approach – there’s something different about getting away from a display and using something tactile – but it’s nice to see something happening with the touch/display end of the equation.

Looking at this at first, it looked like a separate remote-control layer. In practice, though, that “radial menu” is maybe better thought of as a heads-up reference to what gestures do. The result can be really fast gestural editing, as seen here in arrangement:

I’m really keen to try this, especially as arranging with a mouse is painful. (It’s even worse when working with two people, as my studio colleague Nerk can attest.)

You can play right on the interface. Rather than go to a separate iPad remote (as Apple does with its own Logic and GarageBand), Bitwig are building a keyboard right into the tool so you can play directly. It’s like having a hardware controller or an iPad app built into your display.

There’s a built-in drum editor. There’s a pad layout for playing drum pads, as well, plus some touch editing options.

More on 1.3:

Thavius Beck, who is actually featured in press shots from Microsoft, already showed what this might look like on a prototype back in July. I’ll be trying to track down Thavius and having a chat with my Berlin neighbors at Bitwig soon.

When can you use this? Right now. (And that means if you do have a big multi-touch monitor, that works, too!)

http://www.bitwig.com/en/bitwig_1_3

For more like this, check out FL Studio in spring. Oh, and yeah – clearly, part of what’s holding a lot of developers back is Apple and a big Mac customer base. The ones who are focused on other platforms are trying out ideas like this. FL doesn’t have the shortcut gestures Bitwig does, but it does have some other nice ideas, and I’ll bet some FL users are looking at the new Surface line.

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  • Jim Jones

    Bitwig needed a distinct “nitch” / market segment to truly differentiate themselves from Ableton — this just might be it. Very innovative.

  • Jim Jones

    Bitwig needed a distinct “nitch” / market segment to truly differentiate themselves from Ableton — this just might be it. Very innovative.

  • coolout

    Agreed…this seems a bit of a leap over the competition though I haven’t watched all the videos yet. I wonder how 3rd party plugins figure into Bitwig’s strategy. Can multi-touch work directly with GUI of a VST or is the only way to assign macros to individual functions like automation is usually handled? That’s game changer for me. The ease of iOS apps and hybrid stuff like Maschine have me spoiled. I never want to go back to using generic controllers and making overlays or labels. Touch control over full desktop apps is the logical progression. Folks have been begging for a way to easily control UAD plugs for years. Even though Maschine works great, I would love direct touch control of Komplete.

    • That appears to be missing – and it’s a very good question. Will look into that.

    • OB1

      There’s FL Studio 12 multi touch support.

      • nucleon

        Indeed, some piano roll editing, clip triggering and mixer usage shown here for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI43L1Gp9uw

        • Great example, yeah – added to the story. FL has some ideas I think Bitwig may be missing; Bitwig brings some new ideas to the table. If this starts to catch on, we could see more mature features in multiple tools (well, we’ll need that)

  • coolout

    Agreed…this seems a bit of a leap over the competition though I haven’t watched all the videos yet. I wonder how 3rd party plugins figure into Bitwig’s strategy. Can multi-touch work directly with GUI of a VST or is the only way to assign macros to individual functions like automation is usually handled? That’s game changer for me. The ease of iOS apps and hybrid stuff like Maschine have me spoiled. I never want to go back to using generic controllers and making overlays or labels. Touch control over full desktop apps is the logical progression. Folks have been begging for a way to easily control UAD plugs for years. Even though Maschine works great, I would love direct touch control of Komplete.

    • That appears to be missing – and it’s a very good question. Will look into that.

    • OB1

      There’s FL Studio 12 multi touch support.

      • nucleon

        Indeed, some piano roll editing, clip triggering and mixer usage shown here for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI43L1Gp9uw

        • Great example, yeah – added to the story. FL has some ideas I think Bitwig may be missing; Bitwig brings some new ideas to the table. If this starts to catch on, we could see more mature features in multiple tools (well, we’ll need that)

  • NRGuest

    Please tell me this works on a gen 1 surface pro… I will definitely be checking this out tonight.

    • It should… it seems to respond to any Windows multi-touch events. Let us know how it goes.

    • Polite Society

      It totally does, and it’s pretty good.

  • NRGuest

    Please tell me this works on a gen 1 surface pro… I will definitely be checking this out tonight.

    • It should… it seems to respond to any Windows multi-touch events. Let us know how it goes.

    • Polite Society

      It totally does, and it’s pretty good.

  • Student

    Bitwig keeps worring about marketing gimmicks and their desktop application is still an unreliable bugfest.

  • Student

    Bitwig keeps worring about marketing gimmicks and their desktop application is still an unreliable bugfest.

  • Polite Society

    Looks great. Can’t wait to try it out. I’ve both been sad that making music on my surface isn’t as nice as I would have liked, and have been meaning to dig into bitwig more, so double win.

    • Greg Littlewood

      Mobile music just blew my mind again. iPhone and iPad workstations and synths have been blowing my mind for years and now this- Serum, Bazille, Omni, Diva all inside a really remarkable new full-sized DAW, on a tablet. This is huge leap past what iPad pro can do.

  • Polite Society

    Looks great. Can’t wait to try it out. I’ve both been sad that making music on my surface isn’t as nice as I would have liked, and have been meaning to dig into bitwig more, so double win.

    • Greg Littlewood

      Mobile music just blew my mind again. iPhone and iPad workstations and synths have been blowing my mind for years and now this- Serum, Bazille, Omni, Diva all inside a really remarkable new full-sized DAW, on a tablet. This is huge leap past what iPad pro can do.

  • The still unsolved problem with touch screens on computers that are not tablets is: Ergonomics. It simply sucks really hard to point onto a computer or laptop screen for hours with your fingers or a pen (not even thinking about gestures like pinching, sliding etc.) holding your arm raised again and again. It just does not work.

    Touch works for tablets, where you can have the screen laying down flat or slightly angled and you would point down to it. Even larger screens (unless you do like Chris Randall http://analogindustries.com/b1866/It+s+Process+Day/) are not necesarilly a feasible option yet.

    So, bottom line, I am not sure if this will ever work – unless we change human physics.

    • Martin Wheeler

      Once really big touchscreens become the norm, then, as you say, the question of ergonomics becomes paramount. It seems to me the solution is twofold … firstly simply finding the angle that works for what you are doing ( and “painting” / music / monitoring datastreams probably have different optimal angles ) … but for music, if your primary ‘gesture’ screen is slightly angled, as many people angle their tablets ( 15-30Β° I would imagine) then that first screen can be pretty huge before stretching becomes problematic, especially if it is much wider than it is high, and then you can have a second screen at a higher angle ( look at how modern modular synth setups deal with this) … and secondly, by the software progressively taking the ergonomics into account … so that the UI is set up so that most gestures you are making repetitively ( mixing, note editing etc) tend to be (as much as possible) in the part of the screen(s) closer to you, and that don’t involve you raising your arm, wheras the more set and forget stuff ( plugns, timeline overview etc) are in the top/ further away portiion of the screen. ) This is how we tend to set up our physical studios already ( and once again the world of modular synths, especially, has been dealing with this question gor a while ) Of course ergonomics will always be just one aspect of UI, competing with other ‘optimisations’ but when monster touch screens start appearing, it will very quickly start being part of what is being considered …

      • I’d say “if” monster touch screens ever make it into mass market. Which I don’t believe will happen any time soon. But that’s just me, of course.

        Oh, and angling your screen is just one thing. With a laptop, that screen is due to the keyboard always significantly further away than with a tablet. And a large screen will have to solve the problem of an arm resting on it and accidentally triggering gestures.

        • Martin Wheeler

          what exactly do you think there is specific to touchscreen tech that makes it unlikely to follow the same sort of price-size trajectory as non-touchscreen tech ( and pretty much everything else from hard drives to memory sticks to … ) ??? 17″ screens used to be prohibitively expensive, now you get them free with cornflakes and 27″ and up are reasonable … look at the price of smaller touchscreens, and already they are coming way down in price and I see no readon why the currently fairly expensive larger screens used in the Rraven etc will not become reasonably priced fairly soon. We’re not talking mile-wide displays here, I’d be perfectly happy making do with a simple 4 x 30″ touchscreen rig, at least until the Monority Report tech hits πŸ˜‰

          As for resting your arms on the touchscreen, well, no, you probably wouldn’t want to do that (except as an oblique stategy for aleatoric composition πŸ˜‰ ) which is why, as I said, it will become necessary fir UI design to start considering these ergonomic issues so that ΓΏou don’t need to.

          As for laptops. Not sure what you are talking about, are you imagining a monster laptop with its screen snapped back behind its monster keyboard or something ? No, in these scenaris your physical keyboard, if indeed you choose to use one, would of course be seperate, and probably not monster.

    • lala

      Im sitting on the floor and have the tablet on the floor in front of me.what was the problem again?

      • lala

        2 touchscreen one up one down isn’t great, next to teacher (left/right) is much better that way you can still see stuff while messing around on the displays πŸ˜‰

        • Martin Wheeler

          Different strokes for different folks. Exactly where and at what angle one wants different elements of a workspace to be at ( regardless of whether that workspace is physical, virtual or hybrid) is a seriously complex issue involving everything from head height, neck angle, arm fatigue, field of vision and eye movements within it, looking up versus looking down, how often one makes what gesture, placement by the logic of purpose verus the logic of gesture frequency etc etc Getting it right is seriously complex, and is also, obviously, seriously individual. If this was not so our studios would all look the same, and we wouldn’t be moving shit around all the time trying to find the perfect arrangement.

          • lala

            I’ve tried setups with 2 touchscreens
            this is what I came up with

          • lala

            if you want full interaction with both all the time …

          • lala

            one up one down was bad, my hands and arms were to often in the way I couldn’t see enough of the displays anymore …

          • Martin Wheeler

            once again, it depends what you are trying to do, how you like to work, how the software is setup, whether it lets you put the bits of the interface where you want etc. it also depends on the aspect ratio of screens. but if two touchscreens side by side works for you, then it works for you. that doesn’t mean that other people won’t prefer other setups.

      • Well… The problem is that you comment without reading my original post thoroughly. I wrote that the problem is with computers (aka laptops and desktop computers) and not with tablets.

        • lala

          stop wasting thought on this, simply doesn’t work πŸ˜‰

          • Right, so… if only we had
            – laptops that fold into tablets
            – tablets that run Windows (or Linux)
            – multi-touch displays that connect to Windows (or Linux)

            And as it happens, we do have all of of those.

            The Surface Book being a new example.

            But yes, to those PC makers showing people trying to point at a laptop screen, that was stupid. The new Microsoft stuff isn’t that.

        • lala
        • Martin Wheeler

          I would say that what _you_ are not getting is that we _agree_ with you that you don’t want to have your arm hanging in the air all day, so, in order to run programs like Bitwig 1.3 and other DAWs that will follow we _aren’t_ going to use an old school laptop, we are going to use devices that can be put at the angles we want, whether they are ‘tablets’ with the computer inside them or ‘touchscreens’ with the computer somewhere else or new-fangled hybrid laptops where you can swivel the screen and use it in tablet format. Anything _but_ old school laptops. You seem to be trying to argue something like ‘ X just won’t work because human physics would make it uncomfortable to do Y ”

    • U32

      Dont forget “FL Studio 12” has multi touch support as well.

      • And that’s good! But my point is not whether or not any specific software has good or crap user interface for touch applications. My point is the hardware and human physics ergonomics issue.

    • Polite Society

      You know what is good though, being able to mount your tablet pc on a mic stand, or sit on a music stand, and use your finger to start recording while you sit at drums, or hold a guitar or the bunch of other things that are a pain to take to your computer when you want to record.

      Also, this interface actually provides usable arrangement functions in tablet form, which is exactly the sort of thing you want to do when not at home, and not able to record.

  • The still unsolved problem with touch screens on computers that are not tablets is: Ergonomics. It simply sucks really hard to point onto a computer or laptop screen for hours with your fingers or a pen (not even thinking about gestures like pinching, sliding etc.) holding your arm raised again and again. It just does not work.

    Touch works for tablets, where you can have the screen laying down flat or slightly angled and you would point down to it. Even larger screens (unless you do like Chris Randall http://analogindustries.com/b1866/It+s+Process+Day/) are not necesarilly a feasible option yet.

    So, bottom line, I am not sure if this will ever work – unless we change human physics.

    • Martin Wheeler

      Once really big touchscreens become the norm, then, as you say, the question of ergonomics becomes paramount. It seems to me the solution is twofold … firstly simply finding the angle that works for what you are doing ( and “painting” / music / monitoring datastreams probably have different optimal angles ) … but for music, if your primary ‘gesture’ screen is slightly angled, as many people angle their tablets ( 15-30Β° I would imagine) then that first screen can be pretty huge before stretching becomes problematic, especially if it is much wider than it is high, and then you can have a second screen at a higher angle ( look at how modern modular synth setups deal with this) … and secondly, by the software progressively taking the ergonomics into account … so that the UI is set up so that most gestures you are making repetitively ( mixing, note editing etc) tend to be (as much as possible) in the part of the screen(s) closer to you, and that don’t involve you raising your arm, wheras the more set and forget stuff ( plugns, timeline overview etc) are in the top/ further away portiion of the screen. ) This is how we tend to set up our physical studios already ( and once again the world of modular synths, especially, has been dealing with this question gor a while ) Of course ergonomics will always be just one aspect of UI, competing with other ‘optimisations’ but when monster touch screens start appearing, it will very quickly start being part of what is being considered …

      • I’d say “if” monster touch screens ever make it into mass market. Which I don’t believe will happen any time soon. But that’s just me, of course.

        Oh, and angling your screen is just one thing. With a laptop, that screen is due to the keyboard always significantly further away than with a tablet. And a large screen will have to solve the problem of an arm resting on it and accidentally triggering gestures.

        • Martin Wheeler

          what exactly do you think there is specific to touchscreen tech that makes it unlikely to follow the same sort of price-size trajectory as non-touchscreen tech ( and pretty much everything else from hard drives to memory sticks to … ) ??? 17″ screens used to be prohibitively expensive, now you get them free with cornflakes and 27″ and up are reasonable … look at the price of smaller touchscreens, and already they are coming way down in price and I see no readon why the currently fairly expensive larger screens used in the Rraven etc will not become reasonably priced fairly soon. We’re not talking mile-wide displays here, I’d be perfectly happy making do with a simple 4 x 30″ touchscreen rig, at least until the Monority Report tech hits πŸ˜‰

          As for resting your arms on the touchscreen, well, no, you probably wouldn’t want to do that (except as an oblique stategy for aleatoric composition πŸ˜‰ ) which is why, as I said, it will become necessary fir UI design to start considering these ergonomic issues so that ΓΏou don’t need to.

          As for laptops. Not sure what you are talking about, are you imagining a monster laptop with its screen snapped back behind its monster keyboard or something ? No, in these scenaris your physical keyboard, if indeed you choose to use one, would of course be seperate, and probably not monster.

    • lala

      Im sitting on the floor and have the tablet on the floor in front of me.what was the problem again?

      • lala

        2 touchscreen one up one down isn’t great, next to teacher (left/right) is much better that way you can still see stuff while messing around on the displays πŸ˜‰

        • Martin Wheeler

          Different strokes for different folks. Exactly where and at what angle one wants different elements of a workspace to be at ( regardless of whether that workspace is physical, virtual or hybrid) is a seriously complex issue involving everything from head height, neck angle, arm fatigue, field of vision and eye movements within it, looking up versus looking down, how often one makes what gesture, placement by the logic of purpose verus the logic of gesture frequency etc etc Getting it right is seriously complex, and is also, obviously, seriously individual. If this was not so our studios would all look the same, and we wouldn’t be moving shit around all the time trying to find the perfect arrangement.

          • lala

            I’ve tried setups with 2 touchscreens
            this is what I came up with

          • lala

            if you want full interaction with both all the time …

          • lala

            one up one down was bad, my hands and arms were to often in the way I couldn’t see enough of the displays anymore …

          • Martin Wheeler

            once again, it depends what you are trying to do, how you like to work, how the software is setup, whether it lets you put the bits of the interface where you want etc. it also depends on the aspect ratio of screens. but if two touchscreens side by side works for you, then it works for you. that doesn’t mean that other people won’t prefer other setups.

      • Well… The problem is that you comment without reading my original post thoroughly. I wrote that the problem is with computers (aka laptops and desktop computers) and not with tablets.

        • lala

          stop wasting thought on this, simply doesn’t work πŸ˜‰

          • Right, so… if only we had
            – laptops that fold into tablets
            – tablets that run Windows (or Linux)
            – multi-touch displays that connect to Windows (or Linux)

            And as it happens, we do have all of of those.

            The Surface Book being a new example.

            But yes, to those PC makers showing people trying to point at a laptop screen, that was stupid. The new Microsoft stuff isn’t that.

        • lala
        • Martin Wheeler

          I would say that what _you_ are not getting is that we _agree_ with you that you don’t want to have your arm hanging in the air all day, so, in order to run programs like Bitwig 1.3 and other DAWs that will follow we _aren’t_ going to use an old school laptop, we are going to use devices that can be put at the angles we want, whether they are ‘tablets’ with the computer inside them or ‘touchscreens’ with the computer somewhere else or new-fangled hybrid laptops where you can swivel the screen and use it in tablet format. Anything _but_ old school laptops. You seem to be trying to argue something like ‘ X just won’t work because human physics would make it uncomfortable to do Y ”

    • U32

      Dont forget “FL Studio 12” has multi touch support as well.

      • And that’s good! But my point is not whether or not any specific software has good or crap user interface for touch applications. My point is the hardware and human physics ergonomics issue.

    • Polite Society

      You know what is good though, being able to mount your tablet pc on a mic stand, or sit on a music stand, and use your finger to start recording while you sit at drums, or hold a guitar or the bunch of other things that are a pain to take to your computer when you want to record.

      Also, this interface actually provides usable arrangement functions in tablet form, which is exactly the sort of thing you want to do when not at home, and not able to record.

  • Gesslr Gesslr

    The radial menu is brilliant. I have a Raven MTi and it sorely needs this type of interaction. Really stellar solution. As to ergonomics, an angled “smaller” (27 in.) touch screen really does not seem to present a huge issue. Firstly, your arms are rarely extended up on the screen without break for long periods. You are moving, lifting arms up and down, changing touch points, reaching for the mouse, etc. In other words, there is constant motion. Second, you still have to use the mouse for some things (though I suspect the radial menu will cut that down). The angle is the key. A traditionally positioned monitor would be a PIA. Now if we could convince the Wigs to use TUIO on the Mac….

  • Gesslr Gesslr

    The radial menu is brilliant. I have a Raven MTi and it sorely needs this type of interaction. Really stellar solution. As to ergonomics, an angled “smaller” (27 in.) touch screen really does not seem to present a huge issue. Firstly, your arms are rarely extended up on the screen without break for long periods. You are moving, lifting arms up and down, changing touch points, reaching for the mouse, etc. In other words, there is constant motion. Second, you still have to use the mouse for some things (though I suspect the radial menu will cut that down). The angle is the key. A traditionally positioned monitor would be a PIA. Now if we could convince the Wigs to use TUIO on the Mac….

  • foljs

    “””Full multi-touch support. This is, of course, essential. It doesn’t work on OS X – there literally isn’t a model for processing the events – but it does open up some possibilities even on Linux.”””

    Well, since it runs on Linux, Mac and Windows, the codebase should be quite portable already.

    So if they bother to make some changes, a touch version could run quite well on iOS (iPad Pro is faster than lots of laptops out there — and it doesn’t share the CPU with 200 other OS services and apps like a desktop OS does).

    You’d miss third party VSTs of course, but they could integrate Audiobus for iOS based music apps.

    • Evan

      It depends how optimized it is for x86. It may not be trivial to port the code directly to the arm based processors in iOS while linux/osx/windows are all on x86 so it can be done much easier. Theres also the issue of the entire UI being done in java and while there are some java tools for iOS im betting they arent up to the task of painlessly porting their entire ui to something that can run on iOS

  • foljs

    “””Full multi-touch support. This is, of course, essential. It doesn’t work on OS X – there literally isn’t a model for processing the events – but it does open up some possibilities even on Linux.”””

    Well, since it runs on Linux, Mac and Windows, the codebase should be quite portable already.

    So if they bother to make some changes, a touch version could run quite well on iOS (iPad Pro is faster than lots of laptops out there — and it doesn’t share the CPU with 200 other OS services and apps like a desktop OS does).

    You’d miss third party VSTs of course, but they could integrate Audiobus for iOS based music apps.

    • Evan

      It depends how optimized it is for x86. It may not be trivial to port the code directly to the arm based processors in iOS while linux/osx/windows are all on x86 so it can be done much easier. Theres also the issue of the entire UI being done in java and while there are some java tools for iOS im betting they arent up to the task of painlessly porting their entire ui to something that can run on iOS

  • Arjona

    That layout looks pretty unusable.

  • Arjona

    That layout looks pretty unusable.

  • Gunboat_Diplo

    it would be interesting to compare the touch capabilities of Bitwig and Sonar and FL12, a shoot-out to determine the best touch DAW.

    • WetBoy

      Well Sonar needs Win8.1 upwards……Bitwig will work with Win 7 πŸ™‚

  • Gunboat_Diplo

    it would be interesting to compare the touch capabilities of Bitwig and Sonar and FL12, a shoot-out to determine the best touch DAW.

    • WetBoy

      Well Sonar needs Win8.1 upwards……Bitwig will work with Win 7 πŸ™‚

  • Freeks

    “When can you use this? Right now. (And that means if you do have a big multi-touch monitor, that works, too!)”

    We have spare 24″ touchscreen in the office, but it only works with PC πŸ™ (Main reason why it’s not in use) Now need to find space PC from somewhere and DL Bitwig demo to try this out. Thanks for the tip!

    I doubt that touchscreen works with Mac/Bootcamp as i have read that those are bitch get to work even with PC.

    These videos make iPad Pro look very outdated.

  • Freeks

    “When can you use this? Right now. (And that means if you do have a big multi-touch monitor, that works, too!)”

    We have spare 24″ touchscreen in the office, but it only works with PC πŸ™ (Main reason why it’s not in use) Now need to find space PC from somewhere and DL Bitwig demo to try this out. Thanks for the tip!

    I doubt that touchscreen works with Mac/Bootcamp as i have read that those are bitch get to work even with PC.

    These videos make iPad Pro look very outdated.

  • itchy

    this looks cool to me

  • itchy

    this looks cool to me

  • Ashley Scott

    I gave this a quick try on a HP tablet last night – it seems OK really: with the ‘tablet profile’ loaded, many of the on screen controls are easier to grab, manipulate etc & the interface is embiggened in a reasonable way.

    I’m not getting the ‘Radial touch menus’ – just what look like normal desktop contextual menus (I haven’t used Bitwig before). I’m on Win 7 64 bit – I guess I need a newer version of Windows or maybe this is relying on different screen hardware.

  • Ashley Scott

    I gave this a quick try on a HP tablet last night – it seems OK really: with the ‘tablet profile’ loaded, many of the on screen controls are easier to grab, manipulate etc & the interface is embiggened in a reasonable way.

    I’m not getting the ‘Radial touch menus’ – just what look like normal desktop contextual menus (I haven’t used Bitwig before). I’m on Win 7 64 bit – I guess I need a newer version of Windows or maybe this is relying on different screen hardware.

  • lala

    what the hell are they thinking?
    no AUs on mac but instead they support the stylus for (laughs) pressure sensitive input – haha, yes we are bigwig and we hate our mac users and we hate our windows users too – thats why there is stylus support. Come on, for painting notes in the arrangement maybe, for everything else its a sad joke. And I have a very very bad feeling when I see a stylus in a demo, it always makes me think, ah they fucked it up somewhere, doesn’t work without pen all the time.

    • lala

      I wonder if there is some kind of velocity simulation for touch input, I don’t think so, thats what the pen is for ^^

  • lala

    what the hell are they thinking?
    no AUs on mac but instead they support the stylus for (laughs) pressure sensitive input – haha, yes we are bigwig and we hate our mac users and we hate our windows users too – thats why there is stylus support. Come on, for painting notes in the arrangement maybe, for everything else its a sad joke. And I have a very very bad feeling when I see a stylus in a demo, it always makes me think, ah they fucked it up somewhere, doesn’t work without pen all the time.

    • lala

      I wonder if there is some kind of velocity simulation for touch input, I don’t think so, thats what the pen is for ^^

  • Popo Bawa

    I suspect they will offer touch use for OS X as well. Didn’t MacOS have native multitouch support ironed out prior to Linux or Windows? What perplexes me is that hardly anybody seems to use it. I have talked with iOS developers about their lack of OS X ports and many of them cite a lack of multitouch on Mac. But it’s right there!

    I don’t like touchscreens much myself, but I’d prefer a more powerful, expandable tower with a touchscreen for DSP use than a tablet any day.

  • Popo Bawa

    I suspect they will offer touch use for OS X as well. Didn’t MacOS have native multitouch support ironed out prior to Linux or Windows? What perplexes me is that hardly anybody seems to use it. I have talked with iOS developers about their lack of OS X ports and many of them cite a lack of multitouch on Mac. But it’s right there!

    I don’t like touchscreens much myself, but I’d prefer a more powerful, expandable tower with a touchscreen for DSP use than a tablet any day.

  • Sandro

    1) The layout is bad. You need to work some more on it, Bugwig
    2) Stop doing irrelevant stuff and fix your software first, which is still incomplete and half backed

  • Sandro

    1) The layout is bad. You need to work some more on it, Bugwig
    2) Stop doing irrelevant stuff and fix your software first, which is still incomplete and half backed

  • Rand

    It has the most counterintuitive touch gestures I’ve ever seen.

  • Rand

    It has the most counterintuitive touch gestures I’ve ever seen.

  • Free

    BItwig doesn’t know what to do to create buzz. They should put their efforts in making their f****** software work instead. It’s the most buggy piece of software on the planet. 2 years of beta test my ass.

  • Free

    BItwig doesn’t know what to do to create buzz. They should put their efforts in making their f****** software work instead. It’s the most buggy piece of software on the planet. 2 years of beta test my ass.

  • jef

    I’m a 20 year Mac user who loves Logic but this is incredibly exciting. Bitwig is like Logic and Ableton had a baby and I’ve enjoyed using it. Bitwig plus the Surface book could be a really fun and flexible tool.

  • jef

    I’m a 20 year Mac user who loves Logic but this is incredibly exciting. Bitwig is like Logic and Ableton had a baby and I’ve enjoyed using it. Bitwig plus the Surface book could be a really fun and flexible tool.

  • Going beyond the angle-of-screen ergonomics issue, DAWs have to be totally reinvented for a touch paradigm. Simply bolting on native multitouch support without rethinking the UI is only 1/3 to 1/2 the way there.

    Anything intended for touch manipulation has to be large enough to accommodate a finger-sized tap target or control, plus provide an area that isn’t obscured by your hand to show the values or information you’re manipulating; it’s the basic principle of showing the system state, to provide useful realtime feedback to the user.

    When you design for touchscreens, you have to either intentionally limit the amount of information shown on the screen, or aim for a larger screen size, otherwise your UI can get very crowded (see: running an iPad synth on an iPad mini).

    The Raven MTX’s solution is to use a massive screen to provide that kind of real estate; they also use different touch technology (infrared) and custom hardware/software, which isn’t cheap. I’m guessing most home studio users have neither the space nor the money for something like that…

    I’ve been experimenting with a Dell 2240T and the third-party Touch-Base drivers and the results are mixed. It works pretty well as a pointer and you can enable Mac multi-touch gestures as you would use on a trackpad. The real issue is that the software is designed to be used with a keyboard and mouse; and as screens have got larger, software tends to bloat up with more features that eat up that real estate.

    DAWs in general have some of the most complex UIs of any apps sold to consumers. Not only are they oriented towards power users who use keyboard shortcuts, i.e. chording keystrokes, they have a lot of ‘modal’ functions that are only revealed by using right-click contextual menus, mini-menus on panels, floating windoids, drawers, etc… no matter how clean they might look in a screenshot, there’s often a lot of “junk drawer” UI solutions to hide the untamed complexity.

    I applaud Bitwig for taking a step towards a touch-centric DAW, but I think the true solution is to rethink the entire experience from the ground up. What would a DAW look like without all the cruft? Windowless, almost control-less? Imagine literally pinching a waveform to add compression, slicing with a Bluetooth pen ‘scalpel’ to make razor-blade edits….

    Disclosure: I’m a senior UX designer who’s worked on iOS apps.

  • Going beyond the angle-of-screen ergonomics issue, DAWs have to be totally reinvented for a touch paradigm. Simply bolting on native multitouch support without rethinking the UI is only 1/3 to 1/2 the way there.

    Anything intended for touch manipulation has to be large enough to accommodate a finger-sized tap target or control, plus provide an area that isn’t obscured by your hand to show the values or information you’re manipulating; it’s the basic principle of showing the system state, to provide useful realtime feedback to the user.

    When you design for touchscreens, you have to either intentionally limit the amount of information shown on the screen, or aim for a larger screen size, otherwise your UI can get very crowded (see: running an iPad synth on an iPad mini).

    The Raven MTX’s solution is to use a massive screen to provide that kind of real estate; they also use different touch technology (infrared) and custom hardware/software, which isn’t cheap. I’m guessing most home studio users have neither the space nor the money for something like that…

    I’ve been experimenting with a Dell 2240T and the third-party Touch-Base drivers and the results are mixed. It works pretty well as a pointer and you can enable Mac multi-touch gestures as you would use on a trackpad. The real issue is that the software is designed to be used with a keyboard and mouse, so most of the UI elements are tiny; and as screens have got larger, software tends to bloat up with more features that eat up that real estate.

    DAWs in general have some of the most complex UIs of any apps sold to consumers. Not only are they oriented towards power users who use keyboard shortcuts, i.e. chording keystrokes, they have a lot of ‘modal’ functions that are only revealed by using right-click contextual menus, mini-menus on panels, floating windoids, drawers, etc… no matter how clean they might look in a screenshot, there’s often a lot of “junk drawer” UI solutions to hide the untamed complexity.

    I applaud Bitwig for taking a step towards a touch-centric DAW, but I think the true solution is to rethink the entire experience from the ground up. What would a DAW look like without all the cruft? Windowless, almost control-less? Imagine literally pinching a waveform to add compression, slicing with a Bluetooth pen ‘scalpel’ to make razor-blade edits….

    Disclosure: I’m a senior UX designer who’s worked on iOS apps.