reaper

Reaper 5 is out today. It’s the compact, tight, powerful music and audio production software whose users would like to know why more of you aren’t talking about it.

And they have a point. Reaper 5 is US$60 with a bunch of included free upgrades, or a voluntary $225 for “commercial” use. Even the demo runs a full 60 days with no restrictions. Yet Reaper does a lot of things other DAWs don’t – even some of the priciest out there – in a compact tool that has exhaustive hardware and OS support, plus complete scripting.

Now, what Reaper 5 doesn’t have is some easy way of describing in marketing terms. There’s actually not a single sort of “banner” feature. It’d be easier to say that Reaper 5 does what the earlier versions of Reaper does, but “more better.” And so knowing how passionate Reaper users are, I’d love to hear what you care about most.

Also, the simple answer to why more people don’t talk about Reaper is simple. Reaper users love it because the software does stuff other people don’t necessarily care enough about. Unfortunately, some of those people don’t care enough about it to … uh, use Reaper.

But don’t let the nerdiness turn you off. This is a great DAW at a kind of insanely-low, don’t tell your accountants price.

And I can sum up what I think are version 5’s most significant overall improvements:

1. It’ll make you happy if you use video. Support for adding videos to projects is a big feature of Reaper, and now it’s massively improved, including powerful features for decoding and displaying video with high resolution, high performance playback.

2. It has an entire script development environment, built in. Okay, this is pretty geeky, but developers get richer-than-ever options for Lua scripting right in the DAW – including their own IDE. If you don’t code, the upshot is, the people who do can do it more quickly and reliably – and then you can use their scripts to save time. There are tons of API additions, too.

3. It handles multichannel media really well. This lets you edit more easily with formats like Ambisonics.

4. It’s insanely powerful at automation. Automation is recorded per take, and now includes various performance enhancements. It’s sample-accurate with VST3 and JSFX. (We have black MIDI; maybe black VST can be a thing?) All of this can be managed from the Project Bay, too.

5. It’ll keep time however you like. Custom metronome beat patterns ticks away as you want, and a ruler can now accurately display time signature, tempo, and highly accurate video frame info.

6. It’s got a prettier theme. More theme customization options, too.

7. You can group controls. Link track controls wherever you want in the signal flow.

8. It adds MIDI control. MIDI note off velocity is editable, and there are new options for more precisely editing node edges with the mouse.

9. It’s faster and more efficient. There are performance improvements everywhere. I could go into them, but they’re boring to write about, so instead I’ll do what they do and save you time.

10. It doesn’t abandon older OSes. Okay, that’s not an upgrade – but it’s the absence of a downgrade. And in an industry where this is increasingly uncommon, you can run Reaper all the way back to XP on Windows, or 10.5 on OS X. (Note that the same can’t be said of all the plug-in formats and plug-ins, but still.) It also plays nice under WINE, so you can run it under Linux even though there’s not a Linux native version.

Video support (for film/TV scoring, for instance) is a major difference between Reaper and PreSonus’ Studio One, as mentioned before. So, too, is scriptability. So while I do admire Studio One, those could be deciding points from some readers, as we heard in comments.

And Reaper still does the stuff it already did well. That includes loads of multichannel and routing features (including real surround support), lots of nice built-in effects, modulation features, and OSC support for easy control. And it’s small enough to put on a portable drive, so you can take it with you to someone else’s studio.

But you don’t have to take my word for it. You can try it for two months free and see if it makes you happy.

http://reaper.fm/download.php

And for more, turn to the founder of developer Cockos.

Justin Frankel isn’t just an important name in the world of DAWs. He has possibly the most unique resume in the business, as the man behind Winamp and gnutella (kids, ask your Gen X parents about that file sharing service), not to mention making a crucifix-shaped programmable DSP platform called Jesusonic.

Seriously, the number of people who have both sold a company to AOL and made a big messiah-themed effects platform are … one.

He spoke to our friends at SonicScoop, wearing a possibly Jesus-ish beard.

And talks about what makes the tool special:

And has

And for more:

http://reaperblog.net/

Meanwhile, the roots of that Jesusonic remain in Reaper. I just hope for Reaper hardware. Because:

crusfx1000_pre_small

http://www.cockos.com/jesusonic/

And if you do want to learn scripting:

  • jeremywen

    (“powerful features for decoding and displaying video with high.”) resolution?

    • Polite Society

      They fixed it so you can see the video while high.

      • Ha!

        Yes, I was evidently using my powerful tools for copy editing while high.

        Fixed. 😉

  • jeremywen

    (“powerful features for decoding and displaying video with high.”) resolution?

    • Polite Society

      They fixed it so you can see the video while high.

      • Ha!

        Yes, I was evidently using my powerful tools for copy editing while high.

        Fixed. 😉

  • jeremywen

    (“powerful features for decoding and displaying video with high.”) resolution?

    • Polite Society

      They fixed it so you can see the video while high.

      • Ha!

        Yes, I was evidently using my powerful tools for copy editing while high.

        Fixed. 😉

  • anselm

    I can only confirm what you wrote: I read feature after feature and find most of it just makes me shrug my shoulders. Not what I am looking for.

    • Well, I mean, it also fits generally under the category of “I want a good DAW and I want to spend about $60.” Because the main use cases for DAWs do tend to cover the same bases.

      • anselm

        True. But for me there is a lot of things to be desired in DAWs in the market and Reaper doesn`t answer this demand. My subjective perspective.

        • MarkS

          I’m really curious – what are you looking for in a DAW that Reaper doesn’t do?

    • Will

      It’s a strange thing with release notes—particularly for an application like Reaper that releases updates constantly. You almost lose the lede in the stream of releases. Seriously, look at this list: http://www.reaper.fm/whatsnew.txt I bet you don’t make it to 4.0!

  • anselm

    I can only confirm what you wrote: I read feature after feature and find most of it just makes me shrug my shoulders. Not what I am looking for.

    • Well, I mean, it also fits generally under the category of “I want a good DAW and I want to spend about $60.” Because the main use cases for DAWs do tend to cover the same bases.

      • anselm

        True. But for me there is a lot of things to be desired in DAWs in the market and Reaper doesn`t answer this demand. My subjective perspective.

        • MarkS

          I’m really curious – what are you looking for in a DAW that Reaper doesn’t do?

    • Will

      It’s a strange thing with release notes—particularly for an application like Reaper that releases updates constantly. You almost lose the lede in the stream of releases. Seriously, look at this list: http://www.reaper.fm/whatsnew.txt I bet you don’t make it to 4.0!

  • anselm

    I can only confirm what you wrote: I read feature after feature and find most of it just makes me shrug my shoulders. Not what I am looking for.

    • Well, I mean, it also fits generally under the category of “I want a good DAW and I want to spend about $60.” Because the main use cases for DAWs do tend to cover the same bases.

      • anselm

        True. But for me there is a lot of things to be desired in DAWs in the market and Reaper doesn`t answer this demand. My subjective perspective.

        • MarkS

          I’m really curious – what are you looking for in a DAW that Reaper doesn’t do?

    • Will

      It’s a strange thing with release notes—particularly for an application like Reaper that releases updates constantly. You almost lose the lede in the stream of releases. Seriously, look at this list: http://www.reaper.fm/whatsnew.txt I bet you don’t make it to 4.0!

  • coding

    Sometimes small things matter most. For me the average user the most important thing is that the colors of the tracks default theme changes (not only the clips). I know that it sounds silly but when you have lot of tracks and all of them are white it can be frustrating to find the one you need to change.

  • coding

    Sometimes small things matter most. For me the average user the most important thing is that the colors of the tracks default theme changes (not only the clips). I know that it sounds silly but when you have lot of tracks and all of them are white it can be frustrating to find the one you need to change.

  • coding

    Sometimes small things matter most. For me the average user the most important thing is that the colors of the tracks default theme changes (not only the clips). I know that it sounds silly but when you have lot of tracks and all of them are white it can be frustrating to find the one you need to change.

  • Kinetic Monkey

    I used to use Reaper but abandoned it in favour of the flexible and creative compositional structure of Ableton. That said I found it incredibly light on the CPU and powerful for multi tracking/mixing.

    • Yeah, and that’s fair – it’s a completely different workflow in Session View in Ableton.

      • Kinetic Monkey

        Totally, and it just encourages me to “play around” instead of always work with a focus. That said the more I use Ableton, the more I find myself in Arrangement view, chopping and consolidating, chopping and consolidating.

        Back to Reaper though, I do miss EVERYTHING being compatible with it.

        • garyg2

          I use both Reaper and Live; initially I used Live solely for it’s session view when I wanted to mess with loop-based music. As time went on though I too found myself using it more and more for Arrangement view tasks (chopping up field recordings etc). I found, for example, things like the track grouping are simpler/not as extensive as Reaper but did what I needed with less fuss.

          But, something keeps pulling me back to Reaper; maybe the automation just seems less fiddly, certainly I find the audio cross fading simpler etc.

          So, both great, complimentary tools imho.

          • NRGuest

            Any advice for a Live user wanting to learn the Reaper workflow?

          • Think of Live’s arrangement view, but instead of feeling very clumsy (IMHO at least), you have total control.

          • garyg2

            I struggle to really define Reapers ‘workflow’, maybe it lacks one…?

            A big part of Repaers appeal to me is that it’s workspace is almost a blank canvas; I can just throw whatever I want on to tracks and it all just works without having to think too hard as to how to achieve it (routing excepted… :)) It doesn’t impose a way of working.

            For instance, I was recently playing with a generative midi ensemble in reaktor. In Reaper I just created a track (simple double click on the left) and dragged what I needed on to it; Reaktor followed by a midi force-to-scale plug followed by a synth and effects. In Ableton I had to have Reaktor on one track with a second track taking it’s input from the Reaktor track. Also Lives midi effects could only go before the synth so had to duplicated when I doubled the synth. Also have to pay much more attention to which version of reaktor I use (effect or instrument).

      • Ashley Scott

        to my eyes (microscopic cursors, Ableton-cosmos-only zoom & scroll methods etc) Ableton Session view has been saying ‘go away’ since Live 5.
        I wish they’d spend some time…making it better…

  • Kinetic Monkey

    I used to use Reaper but abandoned it in favour of the flexible and creative compositional structure of Ableton. That said I found it incredibly light on the CPU and powerful for multi tracking/mixing.

    • Yeah, and that’s fair – it’s a completely different workflow in Session View in Ableton.

      • Kinetic Monkey

        Totally, and it just encourages me to “play around” instead of always work with a focus. That said the more I use Ableton, the more I find myself in Arrangement view, chopping and consolidating, chopping and consolidating.

        Back to Reaper though, I do miss EVERYTHING being compatible with it.

        • garyg2

          I use both Reaper and Live; initially I used Live solely for it’s session view when I wanted to mess with loop-based music. As time went on though I too found myself using it more and more for Arrangement view tasks (chopping up field recordings etc). I found, for example, things like the track grouping are simpler/not as extensive as Reaper but did what I needed with less fuss.

          But, something keeps pulling me back to Reaper; maybe the automation just seems less fiddly, certainly I find the audio cross fading simpler etc.

          So, both great, complimentary tools imho.

          • NRGuest

            Any advice for a Live user wanting to learn the Reaper workflow?

          • Think of Live’s arrangement view, but instead of feeling very clumsy (IMHO at least), you have total control.

          • garyg2

            I struggle to really define Reapers ‘workflow’, maybe it lacks one…?

            A big part of Repaers appeal to me is that it’s workspace is almost a blank canvas; I can just throw whatever I want on to tracks and it all just works without having to think too hard as to how to achieve it (routing excepted… :)) It doesn’t impose a way of working.

            For instance, I was recently playing with a generative midi ensemble in reaktor. In Reaper I just created a track (simple double click on the left) and dragged what I needed on to it; Reaktor followed by a midi force-to-scale plug followed by a synth and effects. In Ableton I had to have Reaktor on one track with a second track taking it’s input from the Reaktor track. Also Lives midi effects could only go before the synth so had to duplicated when I doubled the synth. Also have to pay much more attention to which version of reaktor I use (effect or instrument).

      • Ashley Scott

        to my eyes (microscopic cursors, Ableton-cosmos-only zoom & scroll methods etc) Ableton Session view has been saying ‘go away’ since Live 5.
        I wish they’d spend some time…making it better…

  • I used to use Reaper but abandoned it in favour of the flexible and creative compositional structure of Ableton. That said I found it incredibly light on the CPU and powerful for multi tracking/mixing.

    • Yeah, and that’s fair – it’s a completely different workflow in Session View in Ableton.

      • Totally, and it just encourages me to “play around” instead of always work with a focus. That said the more I use Ableton, the more I find myself in Arrangement view, chopping and consolidating, chopping and consolidating.

        Back to Reaper though, I do miss EVERYTHING being compatible with it.

        • garyg2

          I use both Reaper and Live; initially I used Live solely for it’s session view when I wanted to mess with loop-based music. As time went on though I too found myself using it more and more for Arrangement view tasks (chopping up field recordings etc). I found, for example, things like the track grouping are simpler/not as extensive as Reaper but did what I needed with less fuss.

          But, something keeps pulling me back to Reaper; maybe the automation just seems less fiddly, certainly I find the audio cross fading simpler etc.

          So, both great, complimentary tools imho.

          • NRGuest

            Any advice for a Live user wanting to learn the Reaper workflow?

          • Think of Live’s arrangement view, but instead of feeling very clumsy (IMHO at least), you have total control.

          • garyg2

            I struggle to really define Reapers ‘workflow’, maybe it lacks one…?

            A big part of Repaers appeal to me is that it’s workspace is almost a blank canvas; I can just throw whatever I want on to tracks and it all just works without having to think too hard as to how to achieve it (routing excepted… :)) It doesn’t impose a way of working.

            For instance, I was recently playing with a generative midi ensemble in reaktor. In Reaper I just created a track (simple double click on the left) and dragged what I needed on to it; Reaktor followed by a midi force-to-scale plug followed by a synth and effects. In Ableton I had to have Reaktor on one track with a second track taking it’s input from the Reaktor track. Also Lives midi effects could only go before the synth so had to duplicated when I doubled the synth. Also have to pay much more attention to which version of reaktor I use (effect or instrument).

      • Ashley Scott

        to my eyes (microscopic cursors, Ableton-cosmos-only zoom & scroll methods etc) Ableton Session view has been saying ‘go away’ since Live 5.
        I wish they’d spend some time…making it better…

  • Derpatron9000

    “a compact tool that has exhaustive hardware and OS support”

    Windows + Mac is hardly exhaustive.

    • Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, OS X 10.5, OX 10.6, OS X 10.7, OS X 10.8, OS X 10.9, and OS X 10.10. Also full WINE support so it’s compatible with Linux – and actually quite a few people running it that way (and not true of all Windows applications in WINE.)

      Which OS were you looking for, exactly?

      • Kinetic Monkey

        DOS?

      • Derpatron9000

        It’s fairly trivial to write code which will run on any version of windows, code which will work on any OSX. Native Linux support would be nice. “Full WINE support” isn’t an application specific thing. You seem to think that two Operating systems (yeah, ignore versions because that’s the part of the point of writing decent code) is extensive.

        • Derpatron9000

          err, “exhaustive”

          • ElectroB

            http://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0&qpsp=198&qpnp=1&qptimeframe=M

            Windows 7 60.75%
            Windows 8.1 8.09%
            Windows XP 8.10%
            Mac OS X 10.10 4.74%
            Windows 8 1.77%
            Windows Vista 1.84%
            Ubuntu 1.68%
            Mac OS X (other) 1.60%
            Mac OS X 10.9 1.32%
            Windows (other) 0.09%
            Windows 10 0.02%

          • Derpatron9000

            You don’t write applications to work with a third party compatability layer, it doesn’t work like this. WINE manages to run lots of things, some very well, some ‘good enough’, others not well enough for use as a daily driver.

            http://wiki.cockos.com/wiki/index.php/How_to_run_Reaper_in_Wine_on_Linux

            “The major drawbacks being higher cpu usage, higher latency, and a slightly sluggish gui.”

            It’s nice that it works, though with mixed results, and requiring end users to apply patches in the manner described is less than ideal. I 100% agree with the numbers. In the near future they would not see a return on their investment porting to Linux. My comment was regarding the authors choice of words, not the offering of a third party.

          • Ashley Scott

            Tracktion for linux: maybe some ongoing stability issues affecting all platforms – related to the plugins you host) one licence & rationalise your app usage across several platforms… ?

        • It’s fairly trivial to write code that will compile on any operating system – sure. Take out the GUI and you can I’m sure easily compile Reaper for the Amiga.

          “It’s very trivial to develop and support a DAW with compatibility with multiple plug-in formats on a multitude of different OS versions”

          – said no one, ever.

          This is thee operating system platforms – that’ll be, erm, *all* of the ones presently in any frequent use – and 11 discrete major OS versions to support.

          “Ignore versions because that’s the part of the point of writing decent code”

          So, what you’re saying is, the purpose of developing code is the ability to support a multitude of different versions of an operating system seamlessly.

          Because, I suppose if something were coded this way, it would have “exhaustive OS support.”

          • Derpatron9000

            “Take out the GUI and you can I’m sure easily compile Reaper for the Amiga.” I’m not convinced you know what you’re talking about.

            “This is thee operating system platforms – that’ll be, erm, *all* of the
            ones presently in any frequent use – and 11 discrete major OS versions to support.” Reaper supports two OS, Windows and OSX. WINE is a compatabilty later, you don’t code apps to work with WINE. Linux is not supported. What is the third OS you alude to?

            “So, what you’re saying is, the purpose of developing code is the ability to support a multitude of different versions of an operating system seamlessly.” The purpose of developing code depends on your goals, but thanks for putting words in my mouth.

        • Peter

          LOL – tell that to Avid (Pro Tools, Media Composer, Sibelius).

      • socialdiscard

        Atari ST ;P

    • Johannes Mazur

      You forgot about Linux and USB. It’s not only the host, they also mean interface and Midi controllers. Or OSC. Or simple remote control via the internet. Man, you could put a toolbar on your smartphone, or a channel strip, go into the vocal booth and control the recording from there just by using your smartphone. Rethink your statement

  • Derpatron9000

    “a compact tool that has exhaustive hardware and OS support”

    Windows + Mac is hardly exhaustive.

    • Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, OS X 10.5, OX 10.6, OS X 10.7, OS X 10.8, OS X 10.9, and OS X 10.10. Also full WINE support so it’s compatible with Linux – and actually quite a few people running it that way (and not true of all Windows applications in WINE.)

      Which OS were you looking for, exactly?

      • Kinetic Monkey

        DOS?

      • Derpatron9000

        It’s fairly trivial to write code which will run on any version of windows, code which will work on any OSX. Native Linux support would be nice. “Full WINE support” isn’t an application specific thing. You seem to think that two Operating systems (yeah, ignore versions because that’s the part of the point of writing decent code) is extensive.

        • Derpatron9000

          err, “exhaustive”

          • ElectroB

            http://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0&qpsp=198&qpnp=1&qptimeframe=M

            Windows 7: 60.75 %
            Windows 8.1: 13.09 %
            Windows XP: 11.74 %
            Mac OS X 10.10: 4.74 %
            Windows 8: 2.77 %
            Windows Vista: 1.84 %
            Linux: 1.68 %
            Other: 3.4 %

            Considering that Cockos is not exactly a big company and probably has limited resources, and also considering Linux accounts for much less than 5% of the potential user base, offering Wine support and concentrating on stable, bug-free Windows and OSX versions seems like a good compromise.

          • Derpatron9000

            You don’t write applications to work with a third party compatability layer, it doesn’t work like this. WINE manages to run lots of things, some very well, some ‘good enough’, others not well enough for use as a daily driver.

            http://wiki.cockos.com/wiki/index.php/How_to_run_Reaper_in_Wine_on_Linux

            “The major drawbacks being higher cpu usage, higher latency, and a slightly sluggish gui.”

            It’s nice that it works, though with mixed results, and requiring end users to apply patches in the manner described is less than ideal. I 100% agree with the numbers. In the near future they would not see a return on their investment porting to Linux. My comment was regarding the authors choice of words, not the offering of a third party.

          • Ashley Scott

            Tracktion for linux: maybe some ongoing stability issues affecting all platforms – related to the plugins you host) one licence & rationalise your app usage across several platforms… ?

        • It’s fairly trivial to write code that will compile on any operating system – sure. Take out the GUI and you can I’m sure easily compile Reaper for the Amiga.

          “It’s very trivial to develop and support a DAW with compatibility with multiple plug-in formats on a multitude of different OS versions”

          – said no one, ever.

          This is thee operating system platforms – that’ll be, erm, *all* of the ones presently in any frequent use – and 11 discrete major OS versions to support.

          “Ignore versions because that’s the part of the point of writing decent code”

          So, what you’re saying is, the purpose of developing code is the ability to support a multitude of different versions of an operating system seamlessly.

          Because, I suppose if something were coded this way, it would have “exhaustive OS support.”

          • Derpatron9000

            “Take out the GUI and you can I’m sure easily compile Reaper for the Amiga.” I’m not convinced you know what you’re talking about.

            “This is thee operating system platforms – that’ll be, erm, *all* of the
            ones presently in any frequent use – and 11 discrete major OS versions to support.” Reaper supports two OS, Windows and OSX. WINE is a compatabilty later, you don’t code apps to work with WINE. Linux is not supported. What is the third OS you alude to?

            “So, what you’re saying is, the purpose of developing code is the ability to support a multitude of different versions of an operating system seamlessly.” The purpose of developing code depends on your goals, but thanks for putting words in my mouth.

        • Peter

          LOL – tell that to Avid (Pro Tools, Media Composer, Sibelius).

      • socialdiscard

        Atari ST ;P

    • Johannes Mazur

      You forgot about Linux and USB. It’s not only the host, they also mean interface and Midi controllers. Or OSC. Or simple remote control via the internet. Man, you could put a toolbar on your smartphone, or a channel strip, go into the vocal booth and control the recording from there just by using your smartphone. Rethink your statement ?

  • Derpatron9000

    “a compact tool that has exhaustive hardware and OS support”

    Windows + Mac is hardly exhaustive.

    • Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, OS X 10.5, OX 10.6, OS X 10.7, OS X 10.8, OS X 10.9, and OS X 10.10. Also full WINE support so it’s compatible with Linux – and actually quite a few people running it that way (and not true of all Windows applications in WINE.)

      Which OS were you looking for, exactly?

      • DOS?

      • Derpatron9000

        It’s fairly trivial to write code which will run on any version of windows, code which will work on any OSX. Native Linux support would be nice. “Full WINE support” isn’t an application specific thing. You seem to think that two Operating systems (yeah, ignore versions because that’s the part of the point of writing decent code) is extensive.

        • Derpatron9000

          err, “exhaustive”

          • Elekb

            http://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0&qpsp=198&qpnp=1&qptimeframe=M

            Windows 7: 60.75 %
            Windows 8.1: 13.09 %
            Windows XP: 11.74 %
            Mac OS X 10.10: 4.74 %
            Windows 8: 2.77 %
            Windows Vista: 1.84 %
            Linux: 1.68 %
            Other: 3.4 %

            Considering that Cockos is not exactly a big company and probably has limited resources, and also considering Linux accounts for much less than 5% of the potential user base, offering Wine support and concentrating on stable, bug-free Windows and OSX versions seems like a good compromise.

          • Derpatron9000

            You don’t write applications to work with a third party compatability layer, it doesn’t work like this. WINE manages to run lots of things, some very well, some ‘good enough’, others not well enough for use as a daily driver.

            http://wiki.cockos.com/wiki/index.php/How_to_run_Reaper_in_Wine_on_Linux

            “The major drawbacks being higher cpu usage, higher latency, and a slightly sluggish gui.”

            It’s nice that it works, though with mixed results, and requiring end users to apply patches in the manner described is less than ideal. I 100% agree with the numbers. In the near future they would not see a return on their investment porting to Linux. My comment was regarding the authors choice of words, not the offering of a third party.

          • Ashley Scott

            Tracktion for linux: maybe some ongoing stability issues affecting all platforms – related to the plugins you host) one licence & rationalise your app usage across several platforms… ?

        • It’s fairly trivial to write code that will compile on any operating system – sure. Take out the GUI and you can I’m sure easily compile Reaper for the Amiga.

          “It’s very trivial to develop and support a DAW with compatibility with multiple plug-in formats on a multitude of different OS versions”

          – said no one, ever.

          This is thee operating system platforms – that’ll be, erm, *all* of the ones presently in any frequent use – and 11 discrete major OS versions to support.

          “Ignore versions because that’s the part of the point of writing decent code”

          So, what you’re saying is, the purpose of developing code is the ability to support a multitude of different versions of an operating system seamlessly.

          Because, I suppose if something were coded this way, it would have “exhaustive OS support.”

          • Derpatron9000

            “Take out the GUI and you can I’m sure easily compile Reaper for the Amiga.” I’m not convinced you know what you’re talking about.

            “This is thee operating system platforms – that’ll be, erm, *all* of the
            ones presently in any frequent use – and 11 discrete major OS versions to support.” Reaper supports two OS, Windows and OSX. WINE is a compatabilty later, you don’t code apps to work with WINE. Linux is not supported. What is the third OS you alude to?

            “So, what you’re saying is, the purpose of developing code is the ability to support a multitude of different versions of an operating system seamlessly.” The purpose of developing code depends on your goals, but thanks for putting words in my mouth.

        • Peter

          LOL – tell that to Avid (Pro Tools, Media Composer, Sibelius).

      • socialdiscard

        Atari ST ;P

    • Johannes Mazur

      You forgot about Linux and USB. It’s not only the host, they also mean interface and Midi controllers. Or OSC. Or simple remote control via the internet. Man, you could put a toolbar on your smartphone, or a channel strip, go into the vocal booth and control the recording from there just by using your smartphone. Rethink your statement 😉

  • SomeDude

    I would say its “banner” feature is how incredibly customizable it is, more than any DAW out there. You can almost reshape it. I played with it in the past and I spent more time setting it up and customizing it than recording any music… that’s the flip side. I went back to Logic.

    • geoff

      Exactly that, I’d need a decent logic to repear guide

  • SomeDude

    I would say its “banner” feature is how incredibly customizable it is, more than any DAW out there. You can almost reshape it. I played with it in the past and I spent more time setting it up and customizing it than recording any music… that’s the flip side. I went back to Logic.

    • geoff

      Exactly that, I’d need a decent logic to repear guide

  • SomeDude

    I would say its “banner” feature is how incredibly customizable it is, more than any DAW out there. You can almost reshape it. I played with it in the past and I spent more time setting it up and customizing it than recording any music… that’s the flip side. I went back to Logic.

    • geoff

      Exactly that, I’d need a decent logic to repear guide

  • Robsol

    What I’m most curious about is that you can now edit video, with effects, alongside audio. Just a simple video clip crossfade (just like you edit the audio) function makes it enormously functional for me. I tried this in the beta version and it was a little buggy as you might expect, but I have no doubt that the issues I encountered will be cleared, if not already then soon. Their upgrade history is great.

  • Robsol

    What I’m most curious about is that you can now edit video, with effects, alongside audio. Just a simple video clip crossfade (just like you edit the audio) function makes it enormously functional for me. I tried this in the beta version and it was a little buggy as you might expect, but I have no doubt that the issues I encountered will be cleared, if not already then soon. Their upgrade history is great.

  • Robsol

    What I’m most curious about is that you can now edit video, with effects, alongside audio. Just a simple video clip crossfade (just like you edit the audio) function makes it enormously functional for me. I tried this in the beta version and it was a little buggy as you might expect, but I have no doubt that the issues I encountered will be cleared, if not already then soon. Their upgrade history is great.

  • I was expecting the next release would leave XP out in the cold. As a reaper user, it makes me happy to hear they haven’t forgotten about us old XP users. (#10!) Some of us can’t/won’t change our OS for silly little reasons like having things just how you want them and not gobbling up all the RAM.

  • I was expecting the next release would leave XP out in the cold. As a reaper user, it makes me happy to hear they haven’t forgotten about us old XP users. (#10!) Some of us can’t/won’t change our OS for silly little reasons like having things just how you want them and not gobbling up all the RAM.

  • I was expecting the next release would leave XP out in the cold. As a reaper user, it makes me happy to hear they haven’t forgotten about us old XP users. (#10!) Some of us can’t/won’t change our OS for silly little reasons like having things just how you want them and not gobbling up all the RAM.

  • Peter

    A very powerful and flexible program. One of the cool features is that there are dozens of different “skins” you can choose from, developed by Reaper users. The Pro Tools theme by Alberto in particular is fantastic.

  • Peter

    A very powerful and flexible program. One of the cool features is that there are dozens of different “skins” you can choose from, developed by Reaper users. The Pro Tools theme by Alberto in particular is fantastic.

  • Peter

    A very powerful and flexible program. One of the cool features is that there are dozens of different “skins” you can choose from, developed by Reaper users. The Pro Tools theme by Alberto in particular is fantastic.

  • chaircrusher

    No one else mentioned it so I will: The original Version 1.0 version of Reaper was amazing for one reason — it did what Sonic Foundry’s Acid could do with loops, about as well as Acid did at the time.

    Now that Acid has undergone a lot of (in my opinion) very clumsy enhancements and updates and ended up in a kind of limbo at Sony, that sort of loop based, automatic time stretching timeline thing lives on in Reaper. It’s just one workflow — and for that matter, you can do something like that in Acid as well — but it is still a great feature. Just painting out a bunch of loops and messing around with them is actually a great workflow, especially for hip hop.

    • LongTimeLurker1stTimePoster

      Great point – though I’d like to chime in that Reaper was my replacement for another simple, powerful tool that I wasn’t able to keep using due to machine transitions and other reasons – Cool Edit Pro 2.0. Having started out in Acid, then eventually working into Ableton, CEP 2.0 was where I did EQ mastering and bounced down into mp3 format. Reaper has taken up that role and I’ve found it worth every penny I gave them.

  • chaircrusher

    No one else mentioned it so I will: The original Version 1.0 version of Reaper was amazing for one reason — it did what Sonic Foundry’s Acid could do with loops, about as well as Acid did at the time.

    Now that Acid has undergone a lot of (in my opinion) very clumsy enhancements and updates and ended up in a kind of limbo at Sony, that sort of loop based, automatic time stretching timeline thing lives on in Reaper. It’s just one workflow — and for that matter, you can do something like that in Acid as well — but it is still a great feature. Just painting out a bunch of loops and messing around with them is actually a great workflow, especially for hip hop.

  • chaircrusher

    No one else mentioned it so I will: The original Version 1.0 version of Reaper was amazing for one reason — it did what Sonic Foundry’s Acid could do with loops, about as well as Acid did at the time.

    Now that Acid has undergone a lot of (in my opinion) very clumsy enhancements and updates and ended up in a kind of limbo at Sony, that sort of loop based, automatic time stretching timeline thing lives on in Reaper. It’s just one workflow — and for that matter, you can do something like that in Acid as well — but it is still a great feature. Just painting out a bunch of loops and messing around with them is actually a great workflow, especially for hip hop.

  • D

    Its banner feature is its absolutely blazing performance and minimal startup time. Second to that is the ease at which different scripting languages are incorporated. Third is its really unparalleled willingness to support old tech. IMO. Any one of these would be enough for me to pick it over its rivals.

  • D

    Its banner feature is its absolutely blazing performance and minimal startup time. Second to that is the ease at which different scripting languages are incorporated. Third is its really unparalleled willingness to support old tech. IMO. Any one of these would be enough for me to pick it over its rivals.

  • D

    Its banner feature is its absolutely blazing performance and minimal startup time. Second to that is the ease at which different scripting languages are incorporated. Third is its really unparalleled willingness to support old tech. IMO. Any one of these would be enough for me to pick it over its rivals.

  • Very nice review !
    … and thanks for presenting my scripting tutorials, that was unexpected 😛

    • sylvertwyst

      i had a quick skim, looks intresting. i might get back to it when i figure out what exactly i want to try scripting :p

  • Very nice review !
    … and thanks for presenting my scripting tutorials, that was unexpected 😛

    • sylvertwyst

      i had a quick skim, looks intresting. i might get back to it when i figure out what exactly i want to try scripting :p

  • Very nice review !
    … and thanks for presenting my scripting tutorials, that was unexpected 😛

    • sylvertwyst

      i had a quick skim, looks intresting. i might get back to it when i figure out what exactly i want to try scripting :p

  • 0912982478635

    For those who do electronic music, one of the nicest features of Reaper is the ‘3D’ editing view of multiple midi tracks. Think Photoshop layers, but with midi events.

    http://music.tutsplus.com/tutorials/working-with-multiple-midi-items-in-reaper–audio-21499

    Seeing all notes and events, in time, aligned with one another is a HUGE workflow advantage once you wrap your head around it. I wish more DAWS would do something like that.

  • 0912982478635

    For those who do electronic music, one of the nicest features of Reaper is the ‘3D’ editing view of multiple midi tracks. Think Photoshop layers, but with midi events.

    http://music.tutsplus.com/tutorials/working-with-multiple-midi-items-in-reaper–audio-21499

    Seeing all notes and events, in time, aligned with one another is a HUGE workflow advantage once you wrap your head around it. I wish more DAWS would do something like that.

  • 0912982478635

    For those who do electronic music, one of the nicest features of Reaper is the ‘3D’ editing view of multiple midi tracks. Think Photoshop layers, but with midi events.

    http://music.tutsplus.com/tutorials/working-with-multiple-midi-items-in-reaper–audio-21499

    Seeing all notes and events, in time, aligned with one another is a HUGE workflow advantage once you wrap your head around it. I wish more DAWS would do something like that.

  • Hal 1200

    It’s called Cock Reaper, I would love to know why it’s called that

    • Peter

      Actually it’s Cockos Reaper, Cockos Incorporated is the company that puts out Reaper.

  • Hal 1200

    It’s called Cock Reaper, I would love to know why it’s called that

    • Peter

      Actually it’s Cockos Reaper, Cockos Incorporated is the company that puts out Reaper.

  • Hal 1200

    It’s called Cock Reaper, I would love to know why it’s called that

    • Peter

      Actually it’s Cockos Reaper, Cockos Incorporated is the company that puts out Reaper.

  • pacyderm

    Does the midi editing still suck? Because that’s the only thing I’m slightly interested in. All these other top features are unimpressive if it’s still a pain to do even the most basic tasks.

  • pacyderm

    Does the midi editing still suck? Because that’s the only thing I’m slightly interested in. All these other top features are unimpressive if it’s still a pain to do even the most basic tasks.

  • pacyderm

    Does the midi editing still suck? Because that’s the only thing I’m slightly interested in. All these other top features are unimpressive if it’s still a pain to do even the most basic tasks.

  • Amy Alice Wilson

    I realize this is probably a dumb question, but does this mean that 4.74% of Reaper users are using Mac OS X 10.10? I’m upgrading my OS and want to know what is the most recent Mac OS that Reaper is compatible with…

  • OnlyMe999

    There is now a native linux beta build (5.20 beta 10).

  • RangeAntelope

    Obviously NOT a REAPER enthusiast… very snotty attitude